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Watch: Activists Hold 'Homophobia Kills' Die-In at Boston South Station

Southstation

Members of 'Join the Impact' Massachusetts held a die-in on Friday at Boston's South Station.

Said David Mailloux, co-organizer of this event, and co-chair of JTIMA: "There are so many examples of legalized homophobia and transphobia that give people in our country the perception that members of the LGBT community are second or even third-class citizens. Such perception leads to bullying in our schools as well as the suicides of those young men and women who are bullied. Sometimes, the result of this perception is grisly bias-motivated crimes where LGBT people are maimed or killed in unspeakable ways. We recognize that discriminatory laws are the root of the issue, and know that repeal of those laws, or enacting laws that protect the LGBT community, is the only way to change the conversations surrounding LGBT people, and make these crimes against our community stop."

Watch it, AFTER THE JUMP...

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Comments

  1. In boston, huh? Yeah...strategery! LOL! I don't like that price, and hence, wouldn't buy.

    Posted by: TANK | Nov 8, 2010 1:30:34 PM


  2. when was this ???

    Posted by: MrBill | Nov 8, 2010 1:43:03 PM


  3. I go through South Station almost every weekday. I'm surprised they found room to lie down, it's usually packed like a sardine can, especially on PM Fri. A couple of trains had probably just pulled out.

    Posted by: ratbastard | Nov 8, 2010 1:59:54 PM


  4. EXCELLENT! This is the anger-based tactic protesters should be using instead of all these asinine "kiss-ins!"

    Posted by: Stuffed Animal | Nov 8, 2010 2:11:52 PM


  5. I'm sorry, the last thing I want to do is discourage people from being activists, but this kind of action really doesn't accomplish anything.First of all, (as Tank, above, pointed out) they are in Massachusetts, which is the best state in the US for gay rights and actually has a statewide commission on gay youth. there's not too much more (maybe a few things) Massachusetts can really do to change its own laws to help LGBT people. Second, the participants just come off as harebrained college kids annoying the public while they are trying to commute home from work on a Friday night. I hope more thought will be put into future actions.

    Posted by: Hunter | Nov 8, 2010 2:17:55 PM


  6. Excellent Protest! This should be happening EVERYWHERE!

    Posted by: InExile | Nov 8, 2010 4:05:07 PM


  7. Where is the outrage?

    Posted by: InExile | Nov 8, 2010 4:05:44 PM


  8. @Inexile A-freaking-men!

    As a life-long resident of Massachusetts, I gotta say Hunter, you couldn't be more wrong. So what if we've got some of the "best" conditions going for us in Massachusetts. Do you really think that means that homophobia and transphobia don't exist here? Well judging by my experiences, I'd say you couldn't be more wrong. And if I'm not mistaken, we've had our share of anti-gay hate crimes, queer youth suicide, and all that other ugly shit of our own, quite recently in fact.

    As for that commission, I worked with queer youth outreach groups when I was a teenager and by then, it existed mostly in name only, since our wonderful governor at the time had zapped its funding, leaving it pretty much useless.

    And how do you know these people haven't suffered just as much or more than what you think? You don't know them, or their stories. And does that even matter? Before you go telling people how they should and shouldn't get other people's attention, think about how lucky you might be not to have been exposed to this. Because quite frankly, I find your comments very, very insulting.

    -T

    Posted by: Jesus | Nov 8, 2010 4:25:11 PM


  9. Homophobia exists every where, including Massachusetts (where a guy shot up a gay bar a few years ago) and evern P-town (where antigay assaults are a common occurence in season.

    Posted by: Hank | Nov 8, 2010 4:46:31 PM


  10. @Hunter
    "(as Tank, above, pointed out) they are in Massachusetts"

    This was done at South Station, a travel hub for citizens going all across MA, NH, ME, VT, CT, NY, PA, D.C., etc. etc. It is the central hub in New England for Amtrak and all major bus lines. The people waiting there aren't necessarily citizens of Massachusetts.

    Lastly, MA still has some work to do, particularly for the T in LGBT.

    Lastly, the majority of people in this action aren't college kids. While JTIMA has a number of college kids among their ranks, most are young professionals or older.

    Lastly, what would you have Join the Impact MA or any MA based gay rights group do every time they hold an action? Hop the bus to NY or PA? MA laws favor LGBT citizens, but public attitude can still use MUCH work. I say this as a gay man who has lived in Boston for eight years.

    You should never insult civil disobedience. If the mindset of equality is not going to be had through patience, understanding, and support, it can most certainly be inspired by pissing people off enough through disruption and making sure they want this fight to end.

    Posted by: RJ | Nov 8, 2010 5:14:30 PM


  11. I also fail at copy/paste and using the word "Lastly"... apologize.

    Posted by: RJ | Nov 8, 2010 5:15:10 PM


  12. My boyfriend and I were chilling out on my balcony the other night, just cozy in our chairs. A few neighbors walked by. The next night I was outside by myself on my balcony and the very same neighbors walked by. Being alone, they both felt compelled to voice their opinion:

    "Faggot"
    "Die you fucking homo"

    This was in Boston, MA. If I wasn't overly confident in myself and if I didn't recognize them as being a horrible waste of space, I would have taken it to heart. Homophobia and Transphobia are very real problems in this nation, even among the gay meccas like Boston.

    Posted by: RJ | Nov 8, 2010 5:19:30 PM


  13. Jesus,
    For your information, I lived in Boston for many years and in fact worked in an office across the street from South Station.
    More importantly, while *social* prejudice still exists everywhere, how is protesting randomly like what's being done in this clip will not do anything to make that better? It won't - it;s just an outlet for emotion, that's all.
    And I repeat, they look like harebrained kids and if I were trying to commute through South Station at that moment, I would have found it annoying.

    Posted by: Hunter | Nov 8, 2010 7:54:51 PM


  14. Hunter, I believe that's the point. If people are dying, then inconveniencing the ignorant with a message is exactly what needs to happen.

    If people don't actually see protest happening in their own lives, it's just a TV show.

    Posted by: Randy | Nov 8, 2010 11:19:16 PM


  15. "And I repeat, they look like harebrained kids and if I were trying to commute through South Station at that moment, I would have found it annoying."

    Again, that's kind of the point of NVCD....

    Posted by: RJ | Nov 9, 2010 10:15:15 AM


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