Comments

  1. Jonathan says

    He had a kid when he was 13? That is a Southern Virginia story. Good for him to still be around. This is what determination looks like. I liked his comment about the power of the mind. So true.

  2. Jonathan says

    He had a kid when he was 13? That is a Southern Virginia story. Good for him to still be around. This is what determination looks like. I liked his comment about the power of the mind. So true.

  3. says

    I was in jr high, but remember that Rcok Hudson moment too and wondering what I was going to do since gay = death in the 80s.

    TC, God bless you man…you are remarkable.

  4. TC Haskins says

    thanks everybody for your thoughts & comments!
    & Milkman…yep…one foot in front of the other…it’s the only way to live..& the post from ME…feel free to contact me to talk if you want to.

  5. Alexander says

    Beautiful. Keep on Truckin T.C.
    Living w/HIV and found that to be so very uplifting. God bless you man, you’ve inspired me! Wishing you continued health and a long happy life.

  6. Ken Sutton says

    Is the rest of this interview posted anywhere? If not can you please post the rest of it? I know TC and he is one hell of a guy. I would love to see the interview in it’s entirity.

  7. Nick says

    Thanks, TC, for this stark reminder of what it was like. I was in my mid 30s in 1985, and living in SF. I had started to see people die at the end of 1981; I was diagnosed with HIV in 1985 after entering a national health study (which I participate in to this day.) I remember we were desperate for anything as a possible cure. I was buying these lecithin packets through a “buyers club” in SF. They came from India, I think, and you had to keep them refrigerated and squeeze the lecithin into a glass of OJ with a RAW egg yolk and swallow that. I did that for a few years. It tasted like crap. But someone had come up with this as a possible remedy and people were desperate to try anything. I remember the summer of 1983 in particular; it was a living nightmare. You’d see people walking through the Castro on Saturday morning, among them your friends, or faces you knew from the gym or the bars or the baths, and they looked like zombies. Some had just discovered a purple spot on their bodies (likely KS, which was rampant then); others’ faces were ashen with the grief of having suddenly lost friends. It was like a wildfire consuming the city. I think about the friends who didn’t make it to 1996, when protease inhibitors appeared, and I wonder what my life would be like if I still had those buddies. Many of them had a more positive outlook on things than I did, and supported me through my fear. Despite that, they went from diagnosis to death in 18 months, which was pretty much the course back then. But we were close and I will never forget my SF family. We were a community fighting — mostly alone — for our survival back then. We forget that at our peril.

  8. says

    Thanks T.C. for your great sharing. I was diagnosed positive in 2002 and confess my feelings were that worst – wouldn’t trust anybody, any doctor, any medicines… just thought death as close. Now I think there might be life after HIV, and your true story becomes part of it. Best wishes =o)