Comments

  1. candideinnc says

    Me, too. This is on a par with the stuff about women’s big breasts in the ’60s. Perhaps it isn’t as bad as the repulsively homophobic humor of Eddie Murphy a few years back, but it is still sexist.

  2. taylor says

    This series is actually quite homophobic and mean-spirited, but gays have been conditioned to accept ridicule based on their supposed sexual practices and stereotypes, something heterosexuals are not burdened with.

  3. Clayton says

    i don’t think it’s that homophobic. the running joke is that the villains are all obsessed with finding out about gary and ace’s gayness, while trying to cover up their own, which is actually pretty accurate and biting social commentary. think of all the people who have rallied against gay rights only to get outed by a gay sex scandal : larry craig, ted haggard, the list goes on and on.

    i’ve always thought it was funny (and kinda hot!)

    props to hamm and fallon, they’re both good guys – advocates for equality, hilarious, and gorgeous.

  4. Jerry says

    Gay superheros are not exactly the stereotype, and if you think these skits are even close to the hatefulness of Eddie Murphy’s ’80s rants, then you haven’t heard them in a while. These aren’t swishy cartoonish queens or biker drag wearing stereotypes from the past and I don’t think it’s mean spirited. Jimmy Fallons wife is an LGBTQ supporter along with her BFF Drew Barrymore and I can tell you that Jimmy is the same way. Now lay off our LGBTQ allies and put that wasted energy somewhere else.

  5. Jim says

    Gee, guys… lighted up! I think its funny! The whole point of SNL is to point out how stupid regular society is.. I can’t wait for the full length feature!

  6. taylor says

    Unfortunately, the majority of people watching it don’t see the supposed social commentary and only see the funny queers being gawked at with their high kicks and all. This is typical SNL, where the “aren’t we enlightened and smart” attitude gives an excuse for all kinds of tired sterotypical humor.

  7. Disgusted Gay American says

    i don’t think it’s that homophobic. the running joke is that the villains are all obsessed with finding out about gary and ace’s gayness, while trying to cover up their own, which is actually pretty accurate and biting social commentary. think of all the people who have rallied against gay rights only to get outed by a gay sex scandal : larry craig, ted haggard, the list goes on and on.

    i’ve always thought it was funny (and kinda hot!)

    props to hamm and fallon, they’re both good guys – advocates for equality, hilarious, and gorgeous.

    Posted by: Clayton | May 15, 2011 10:11:24 AM

    Saw it last night- and Totally Agree with your comment..spot on!

  8. shanesoho says

    I’m with PATRICKZ, TAYLOR, and GREGOIRE.
    for the record, none these actors is even remotely homophobic. we don’t need to bring up their wives’ social involvements in defense of their overall progressive attitudes. it’s just that…i don’t know…i’d like to ask stephen colbert if he thinks, on review of the segment, if the “satire” element of this skit really makes it through; and if NOT, then don’t the laughs simply come at the expense of gay stereotypes?

  9. AdamA says

    This has always struck me as a satire of the people who, in the skits, are a) uncomfortable discussing anything sexual, or b) obsessed with the question of A/G’s sexuality.

    That said, it still isn’t that funny, just on its comedic merits. And it’s more dated now than ever. (I think they sensed that and upped the ante on the possible gayness of the villains, but still. Not that funny.)

  10. ohplease says

    “It might have been funnier had an actual gay actor participated.” That statement is mind-boggling. Are you seriously comparing this to a minstrel show? Or saying that minstrel shows would be okay if only one of the performers was actually black? Or that the magical presence of one gay actor makes something funny? And that none of these implications seem the least bit bigoted to you?

    It’s a parody, a satire, a sex comedy — take your pick. On any political level, it’s saying here are two happy guys that the rest of the world either can’t leave alone or can’t fully accept because they’re different, even though they’re not only not a menace to society, they’re actually heroes. It’s everyone other than the duo that’s always shown to have the problem. The heroes are happily gay and the supervillians are self-loathing closet cases, for heaven’s sake!

    And gay men seriously have a problem with that?

  11. brin says

    It’s really quite insidious and not satirical. What it is really saying is “wink wink” to the straight crowd, we know we have to pretend to the gays’ faces that we accept them, but we all know that we mock them in private – isn’t that hilarious because you know they have anal sex. So 80’s.

  12. Damien says

    @SHANESOHO:

    This brings forward an interesting point: If the entire audience isn’t clever enough to get the full scope of the joke, then should the joke not be made in the first place?

    I tend to think it’s OK to go ahead and make the joke as long as it doesn’t stray so far into hurtful territory – and the AGD probably doesn’t – but even that is subjective. After all, some of the greatest satire in the world will forever be over my head.

  13. candideinnc says

    It isn’t homophobic. As I said above, like the treatment of buxomed women and black women with large derrieres. The comics don’t hate gay people any more than they hated the women. They just have no respect for them.

  14. Bryan says

    Their writers have mastered the single entendre. Maybe next week they’ll work on prat falls and pies in the face.

    Amazing they performed this tedious crap in front of a live audience and weren’t booed. Apparently it’s always 1962 somewhere.

  15. says

    Lighten up! Jeez. You guys are tooooo politically correct. Humor is a very individual and unpredictable thing from one person to the next. And satire especially so, I think. If you can’t find the humor here, go to a political rally.

  16. Hue-Man says

    There was no live audience, it was taped – just like all the funny/original things on SNL. The actual live performances are excruciatingly unfunny and repetitive.

    The players are mostly gay-friendly but the result is something that doesn’t work on any level. The homophobes say “Ew, gay”. The gays say “stereotypical”. Everybody else says, “What’s the point?”

    Shout-out to Chris Colfer who had the best night of anyone (he didn’t have to say anything!).

  17. woodroad34d says

    The early Batman and Robin comics were held up as recruitment books for homosexuality even though both were “straight”. This series of cartoons are in the same mode. The “villains” are obsessed with every little nuance that would the AG team gay–just as people like Glen Beck or Rush Limbaugh would (except the names of the villains have been changed from Big Ass to Big Brain and Rat Boy to Lizardo)

  18. says

    I think people need to lighten up. It’s hilarious. And, yes, it’s social commentary on those obsessed with figuring out whether someone’s gay or not. As for any jokes made at our expense, lighten up. We can’t take ourselves so seriously all the time. None of it was made in poor taste — it’s not as if the ‘ambiguous’ acts prevented them from catching the criminals, they were *how* they kicked butt. If it was in bad taste, it would have been in a completely different direction in that regard.

  19. Paul R says

    I’ve just never found this series funny. The jokes are obvious and stale; basically frat boy humor. I’m not offended, just bored—as I am with most SNL skits involving gays.

    It’s not that I think gays are somehow above mockery—I love the character they have on Weekend Update who plays the uber-gay guide to NYC nightlife. But the jokes used in these skits are simply not that clever. I don’t believe that most of the participants are antigay in any way. I just think it’s sophomoric humor and could be a lot funnier. Last night’s was more clever than all the previous ones, many of which were truly awful.

  20. says

    To call the Ambiguously Gay Duo a minstrel show is more than a stretch, mostly because it puts this parody on the same level of offensiveness as the overtly racist blackface shows that often used slavery as a punchline. Plus, the label insinuates that everyone involved with the SNL bit is a bigot, which, given the pro-LGBT advocacy we’ve seen from the likes of Hamm and Colbert, is simply false.

    Read all of my thoughts here: http://goodmenproject.com/newsroom/snl-ambiguously-gay-duo-jon-hamm-jimmy-fallon-minstrel-show/

  21. Ben says

    I Googled some old episodes yesterday. Some of them are patently offensive or bordering on it. For example the villain who’s brought in when A/G go to a g ay bar for the first time and they dress up in YMCA outfits and the hovering green circular sidekick alien says a slur that would not be accepted in today’s world and shouldn’t have been accepted then. I was shocked it was in there but not surprised. Sad.

    I like what a previous commenter said which is probably the closest to the truth about all these skits: They don’t hate, they just don’t respect.

    Would this fly if the shoe were on the other foot? That’s a valid question for debate discussion.

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