Comments

  1. Frank Butterfield says

    I heard Sean on Andy’s show on SiriusXM Stars not too long ago. They have great chemistry. Sean is a bit darker in outlook and humor than Andy… And, as I was reaching for my phone to see what hockey player just came out, Sean started talking about his girlfriend. Noooooooo!

  2. Rick says

    These comments are typical of why so many straight men are wary of forming friendships with gay men. They will be assumed to be gay, themselves, by many, just for having a gay male friend–which is still a stigma with much of the population, like it or not, and that acts as a disincentive to them.

    So you, yourselves, are just as responsible for the reluctance of many straight men to be friends with gay men as homophobia, itself, is.

  3. AJ says

    Sorry, but I find most straight men a bore, Rick. We have nothing in common, most of the time. It’s rare that I meet one who isn’t all about either sports, big boobs, hunting, fishing, beer or all five at the same time. Bore/snore. We just have nothing in common.

    As for Andy Cohen I would LOVE to slap him like crazy. If for no other eggregious offenses than subjecting the world to those hideous “housewives”.

  4. Rick says

    “It’s rare that I meet one who isn’t all about either sports, big boobs, hunting, fishing, beer or all five at the same time”

    Talk about stereotypes. The fact that you think most straight guys are into hunting and fishing is either a commentary on where you live or just ignorance. Maybe in Wyoming or Arkansas or rural Wisconsin, but in New York or Chicago or LA?

    Sports? Yes. It is how men bond. Including many gay men. And many more would if we managed to eradicate the culture of effeminacy and allow gay men to re-claim their masculinity.

    Big boobs? Yeah. They are straight. No common interest there, but it is just one thing.

    Beer? Yeah. Do no gay men like beer? I sure see a helluva lot of it being drunk in bars.

    All that said, there is SOME validity to your point. And here is why. A homophobic male culture has always insisted that straight men remain distant from each other emotionally and for that reason, they have always stayed away from topics that were too “personal” and might result in emotional closeness between two men. if discussed. Being honest about one’s feelings also can lead to a notion that you are vulnerable (i.e. weak)–which is a no-no in traditional straight male culture.

    So that is why they usually stick with “safe” topics that are impersonal in nature…..or they talk about women, which is a way of reinforcing heterosexuality (and more leeway is allowed in these discussions because by their very nature they are “non-homosexual”)

    That was the OLD straight male culture, but it is changing. What is disconcerting is that as it is changing–and becoming non-homophobic–many gay men seem to be digging their heels in and resisting change, almost as thought they are scared of meeting straight men halfway.

    I think that fear is the result of the built-in fear of masculinity that so many gay men have…..and that is what we need to overcome…..and if and when we do, the barriers between straight and gay men will disappear…..in fact, the terms straight and gay will no longer have much meaning.

  5. TC says

    I used to loathe Andy Cohen. I used to think he was despicable. I thought he was a self-promoting peacock with nothing to offer to this world but the lowest level trash tv. Then I actually watched his show and now I have become quite fond of him. The day he had Jerry Seinfeld on his show and I could see how Jerry squirmed and rolled his eyes and evaded questions, I became a big Andy fan. He brings all his guests to a simple human level where we all poop and have sex and eat bad things and we finally get to see these “stars” in a human way.

  6. Jonathan says

    When Sean had his… issues in the NHL, I thought his best course of action, gay or not, was to come out of the closet and blame all his reprehensible behavior off the ice (on the ice is a whole other story and just depended if he was on the team you were rooting for or against) on the pressures of the closet.

  7. Gay4Days says

    Not afraid of masculinity, just find sports incredibly boring. As do most of my straight friends. Do whatever you please but don’t think that you are more of a man cause you enjoy watching others play games for money.

  8. Contrarian says

    Enough with the stereotypes of both straight and gay men. There are no templates for either except in the minds of those with agendas or the usual pot-stirring trolls on the net. Men all over the sexual spectrum both enjoy watching and participating in various sports. As to S.A., there were players on other teams, and some on his own team who thought he was gay or at least somewhere in the middle of the sexual spectrum. I’m told some sports writers thought so as well.

  9. gwd3rd61@gmail.com says

    I love Andy! He shamelessly seff-promotes but he always seems to be having fun and his visibility only helps our acceptance.

  10. Rick says

    “As to S.A., there were players on other teams, and some on his own team who thought he was gay or at least somewhere in the middle of the sexual spectrum. I’m told some sports writers thought so as well”

    Probably because he endorsed same-sex marriage in New York State and testified on behalf of it in hearings in the State Assembly.

    See what I mean?

    Straight guys can’t win. If they befriend us, they are suspected of being gay by both gay and straight. If they don’t, they are considered to be insecure and homophobic by many gays.

    And then you wonder why many of them therefore don’t even try.

  11. Lindoro Almaviva says

    To hell with the pizza. I’ll eat Andy Cohen for breakfast, lunch and dinner. And after I am done, I’ll have him for dessert. Hottest gay in TV right now

  12. jim says

    Oh, I dunno, most of my male friends are str8. My closest friend (gay) and his partner have many, many str8 male friends as well. The ages range from 20-somethings to 60+. They cover all socio-economic categories, education levels, and many different professions. Some like sports, some are bored by them. They’re not threatened by being seen with a gay man, they themselves sometimes take a stab at participating in camp humor (at an understandably novice level), just as we gay guys participate in their man’s-man humor. They’re good sports at tolerating our jokes about guys with nice, tight butts, we tolerate their jokes about boobs. Just where do you come up with this crap, Rick? Certainly not the real world.

  13. KrisJ2222 says

    Kind of a funny picture. Avery is, by some accounts, bi. It’s only a matter of time, folks. And I couldn’t care less one way or the other.

    I do like his public persona, though.

    Also, on a shallow note: Notice Andy’s wrinkled white, kinda ugly t-shirt.
    Notice Sean’s perfect fitting, perfectly ironed trendy plaid shirt.

    Ironic? Hmmm, no, I think not. Good luck to Sean, and I hope he comes out soon.

  14. UFFDA says

    Have to agree with JIm. Most of my many male friends are straight and completely comfortable with me, as Out as you can be. If it were an issue I wouldn’t know them. Not long ago I belonged to a male group of 16 guys, all straight but me. We met once a week to talk about our lives. Most were married and because we bonded so well and talked about so much substantial stuff, mostly of a philosophic nature, many wives were crazy envious to join us. It never devolved into money, sex or sports and all were lovingly respectful of me. In fact I was having a mutually satisfying “affair” with one of them at the time, definitely subrosa. Many of the guys sought me out and made real efforts to keep in touch after we disbanded. It was all charming, upbeat and hugely supportive to the four or five who were in life, health, marriage, family crises. I did get the feeling that my perceived, and mostly accurate, special openess to men was endearing and heart-warming to these guys, who had, however, been hand-picked by the organizer of the group. So they were not exactly a random selection from off the street.

  15. UFFDA says

    Bottom line as I have seen and experienced it: men love to be loved by other men, and to be loving towards other men. Sex not so much, but sometimes yes.

  16. KrisJ2222 says

    @Rick, I’ll quote your post first.
    “”As to S.A., there were players on other teams, and some on his own team who thought he was gay or at least somewhere in the middle of the sexual spectrum. I’m told some sports writers thought so as well”

    Probably because he endorsed same-sex marriage in New York State and testified on behalf of it in hearings in the State Assembly.

    See what I mean?

    Straight guys can’t win. If they befriend us, they are suspected of being gay by both gay and straight. If they don’t, they are considered to be insecure and homophobic by many gays.

    And then you wonder why many of them therefore don’t even try.”

    Rick, you’ve got a valid point, and I understand your point of view. But first, Sean was thought to be bi by a few (maybe more than a few) long before his endorsement of same sex marriage.

    And not to play into the stereotype (he does, after all play NHL) but Sean has always had an interest in fashion, is a great dresser and was an intern at Vogue magazine – women’s Vogue.

    I confess I’ve had some discomfort coming out to my straight male buddies, and one who I frequently have dinner with, alone. I almost felt like telling him “don’t worry, they won’t think you’re gay just because you’re with me.” After all, most people never suspect.

    But then I realized something, and this is where I strongly disagree with you: If a straight buddy has a terrible time accepting the fact that he may be – briefly – mistaken for gay or bi, then he has no business being your – or my friend.

    I’ve been out with beautiful female friends and it was not lost on me that we’d sometimes get the best table in the house – because we were mistaken for being romantically involved. It was a giggle, and I actually enjoyed the mistaken identity for a little while.

    If I can do it, so can the straight guy.

  17. DrJWL says

    As I often say say on here, Gays Are Their Own Worst Enemies. Average gays seem to have a real problem with other more successful or famous gays. Even Anderson Cooper got a wrath of crap from the boys this week because it took him too long to come out or he was too quiet about it or to public about it or too gay or her mentioned God or someother nonsense. And ANDY COHEN has the nerve to be successful on TV (through garbage, admittedly) and has high profile friends and so he must be punished by the gays amongst us with the lowest possible self esteem. You guys embarass us all with your inferiority complexes.

  18. Rick says

    Don’t take me too seriously, guys. I’m closeted and have never so much as kissed another man. That’s why I hate femmes. Because they get laid and I don’t.

  19. Freddy says

    Not sure where a lot of you live, but for those of us who live in NYC and work in the entertainment world, there’s a lot of gay men and straight men who have formed great friendships…

  20. CVP says

    Andy Cohen strikes me as the type of guy who would have bad breath: a mix of coffee, dry mouth, necrotic muscle tissue from meaty pizza and just a faint whiff of Axe body spray.

  21. Name says

    “It’s rare that I meet one who isn’t all about either sports, big boobs, hunting, fishing, beer or all five at the same time. Bore/snore. We just have nothing in common.”

    I find gays who only talk about musicals, shopping, random hook-ups, and Madonna extremely boring and I have nothing in common with them. I do, however, have straight friends who I am more than happy to hang out with and we don’t discuss anything that you mention. Well, boobs
 because I love boobs, but I am the one that points them out if they’re extra special. It must be tough to surround yourself with only gays who are like you. Or maybe you just don’t have any friends. Hetero stereotypes are alive and well.

  22. vanndean says

    Steve, I don’t know who took the picture. The reason for the look of the picture is that it was taken inside without flash and under incandescent light. As for eating pizza in NYC, one would think that in a city that probably has more pizza places per square mile than even Italy, people would sometimes eat pizza.

  23. vanndean says

    Steve, I don’t know who took the picture. The reason for the look of the picture is that it was taken inside without flash and under incandescent light. As for eating pizza in NYC, one would think that in a city that probably has more pizza places per square mile than even Italy, people would sometimes eat pizza.

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