Comments

  1. Carrie Nation says

    Damn, these people are tedious. Why does everything have to be a struggle for social justice? Why not just write a letter from a marketing perspective suggesting to Hasbro that their packaging and marketing are overlooking a significant (and growing) segment of the market? Because it’s so much more fun to fight the power, fight the power, fight the power that be? Right?

  2. Richard Harney says

    I had an Easy Bake oven when I was a kid. It was not just for little girls. It was for everybody and that was near 30 years ago. We put cookie dough in that sucker all the time and got really warm cookie dough back out of it. Hasbro also has My Little Pony:Friendship is Magic. They also market to little girls as their target audience even though the main demographic that watches it are 18-35 males, including me and I’m a 36 year old brony!

  3. Beth says

    When my son was little he wanted an “Easy Bakin’ Oven” I joked that it was more popular than the easy sausage oven. I got it for him and he tore past any gender specific packaging. He still loves to cook. He’s off at school and tells me all the time about his latest culinary inventions. Lately it’s been curries and pumpkin soup. I’m glad I let him have that oven instead of thinking only girls play with those. BTW his sister never had any interest in the damn thing!

  4. Beth says

    When my son was little he wanted an “Easy Bakin’ Oven” I joked that it was more popular than the easy sausage oven. I got it for him and he tore past any gender specific packaging. He still loves to cook. He’s off at school and tells me all the time about his latest culinary inventions. Lately it’s been curries and pumpkin soup. I’m glad I let him have that oven instead of thinking only girls play with those. BTW his sister never had any interest in the damn thing!

  5. Jack Homemaker says

    Do they still make Suzie Homemaker ovens? I remember about 40 years ago making brownies with a girl friend in a sort of greenish-aqua oven. The color was gender-neutral enough, even if the name was not.

  6. Jay says

    Awesome. When I wad a kid, I longed for an easy bake oven, but due to the marketing I felt like it was shameful for me to even suggest wanting one. Now being an adult I dont care if something is pink or marketed to girls, if I want it ill buy it. But when you’re a young boy it is vastly different, sadly.

  7. says

    When I was a little kid (about 4 years old), my mother sat me on the kitchen countertop with a hand mixer and a bowlful of cake batter and let me go to town. Of course, after I turned to ask her a question and lifted the live mixer blades out of the bowl and splatter us and the entire kitchen, ceiling to floor in cake batter, she thought perhaps that wasn’t such a good idea. But it was a good laugh that we both still remember. Toys are great, but put your kid in the kitchen WITH you and let them see how it’s REALLY done. I knew how to make a pretty decent omelette by age 8.

    If Hasbro had any sense whatsoever, they’d follow KitchenAid’s lead and make those things in all sorts of colors. But, isn’t it interesting commentary to think that we’re concerned about gender roles for toys that “play” cook food when there are so many other children in the world that are lucky enough to have clean water and food to begin with. Sometimes little boys and girls that learn how to do things early also learn later how to make things better in life for others. Keep fighting the good fight, McKenna.

  8. Caliban says

    Here’s an interesting collection of pics and comparisons between “girl toys” and “boy toys” from actual store advertisements. Things like laptops, telescopes, and microscopes branded for girls by making them pink and being FAR less functional (lower magnification etc).

    http://www.buzzfeed.com/hillaryreinsberg/16-ways-the-toy-industry-is-stuck-in-the-stone-age

    I think my favorite is My Cleaning Trolley (“For Girls Only”) for little girls who want to grow up to be hotel maids. http://s3-ec.buzzfed.com/static/enhanced/webdr03/2012/11/29/12/enhanced-buzz-13691-1354211654-2.jpg

    I went to a birthday party for two kids not long ago, boy and girl cousins, and it was hard not to notice the disparity between the gifts. He got Jr Doctor kits and she got Little Miss Dress-Up type things, with costume jewelry and Fisher-Price f*ck-me pumps. Hey, it was the family who bought that stuff so you can’t really blame the toy industry, but she’s not even a particularly “girly” girl.

  9. Kyle says

    The overwhelming majority of chefs are men. Only home cooking has been stereotyped as feminine; professional cooking never has. (So McKenna Pope is a little misinformed.) It actually makes more sense to market culinary toys to boys because 1) many of them (many more than girls) will grow up to be chefs and 2) few girls nowadays will grow up to be traditional housewives.

  10. James says

    @Jack
    I was wondering that too. I believe that it was written by her, because of the tone. It doesnt read like a (more cynical) adult wrote it. Her use/combination of the words “truly perfect present” threw me off as sounding flowery. Also, her writing sounds like her speaking, so Im convinced she wrote it. Of course, its likely that a parent or teacher helped her edit – but thats what parents should be doing – helping their kids learn!

  11. Eric26 says

    Lovely girl, but it’s never been “wrong” for men to be chefs. Men were perfectly happy to say to women, “You can do all the cooking at home, for free, but if you want a PAYING job as a cook well you’d better be a man!”
    Thankfully, we actually let women DO things now.
    That’s why I hate the “well men invented and did all the cool stuff” argument, because yeah, women couldn’t do anything professional because we wouldn’t LET THEM for centuries.

  12. andrew says

    If the people at Hasbro marketing have any brains they will make an Easy Bake Oven targeted for boys and get that cute lively little boy to star in the ad. It could be a win/win. Hasbro makes a lot of money and McKenna’s family won’t have to worry about college tuition for their kids.

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