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Hillary Clinton Comes Out for Marriage Equality: VIDEO

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In a new video from HRC, Hillary Clinton finally says what everyone knew she believed.

Watch, AFTER THE JUMP...

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  1. Great message and thanks, Hillary. However...pronouncements like these mean so much more when the people who make them actually have something to lose. Waiting until you're out of office (or retired from your pro sport, or whatever) diminishes the impact. But again, thanks, Hill.

    Posted by: Don | Mar 18, 2013 10:59:38 AM


  2. Waiting for screaming press releases from Brian Brown, Bryan Fischer, Tony Perkins, et al in 3...2....1....

    Posted by: bkmn | Mar 18, 2013 11:06:53 AM


  3. @Don: A compliment with a "but" attached to it is not a compliment. And she was in office when she said many of these exact same things.

    Posted by: Jack | Mar 18, 2013 11:08:05 AM


  4. not to take anything from your point, don, but she was secretary of state, so i don't think it applies to her (note: sure, she could have done this while senator or running for president).

    Posted by: daftpunkydavid | Mar 18, 2013 11:09:12 AM


  5. Thank you Don. Exactly what I was going to write.

    I understand the role of Secretary of State precludes getting involved the domestic political debate. But she could of done this in 2004, 2006, 2008, or of course back in the 90s when they signed the defense of marriage act.

    I did not like seeing Barack Obama hold a fundraiser with wealthy gay donors two weeks after he came out in support of gay marriage. I hope Hillary doesn't do the same thing. And I hope she won't try and portray herself as some champion of gay rights in speeches (Unless of course she does actually do some championing).

    I hope she runs. I will be voting for her. I'm glad she's done this. But let's not give any more credit than she deserves.

    Posted by: Preludes | Mar 18, 2013 11:16:10 AM


  6. Hope she runs for president.

    Posted by: Mike Ryan | Mar 18, 2013 11:16:24 AM


  7. While some will say too little too late, in her defense there's not much she could do in the past four years. As secretary of state she could not take political positions. It's different from other cabinet posts in that the secretary is supposed above the political fray. For instance it would have been illegal for her even attend Democratic Convention much less give a speech there.

    Posted by: Ozu | Mar 18, 2013 11:17:27 AM


  8. Also @Don - & unless I missed her decision, she has not ruled out a run for the presidency in 2016, or for any other office for that matter. She does indeed have something to lose.

    I wish we weren't so snarky with allies. Maybe we could try to accept the expressions of support withut carping about how they are flawed. Everything is flawed and imperfect.

    Posted by: Rob | Mar 18, 2013 11:18:30 AM


  9. Finally.

    Posted by: Jake Orlando | Mar 18, 2013 11:19:29 AM


  10. I really like Hillary Clinton and I fervently hope she does NOT run for Presidency in 2016.

    In a country of 310,000,000 the US does NOT need dynastic political families. The Bushes, Clintons; Kennedys etc need to be consigned to the dustbin of history.

    Posted by: MaryM | Mar 18, 2013 11:21:44 AM


  11. Wonderful, thank you. I also hope she runs for president.

    Posted by: Matt26 | Mar 18, 2013 11:23:50 AM


  12. Dear god, the speed with which fellow homos are quick to condemn anyone who comes out in support of our equality as too little, too late amazes me. Do you want support or not? Every voice coming out in support is another that drowns out the opposition.

    If you have nothing nice to say, do everyone a favor and shut your mouth. I'd prefer encouraging people who have yet to voice their support to do so rather than make them wonder why they'd bother when those they are trying to help don't seem very welcoming of the support.

    Posted by: FancyPants | Mar 18, 2013 11:24:30 AM


  13. Yes, FancyPants.

    Posted by: Paul R | Mar 18, 2013 11:30:50 AM


  14. @ Fancy Pants and Rob. They aren't our allies if their support is tepid and conditional and done out of necessity.

    The victories for gay marriage have been won in the courts and slowly in public opinion polls due to the work of hard nosed activists and crowds of gay Americans and our supporters....NOT by Hillary Clinton or Barack Obama. No one here is being bitchy by receiving this video with skepticism.

    Posted by: Preludes | Mar 18, 2013 11:33:00 AM


  15. This is hardly the first time she's stood up for gay rights.


    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks to the National Prayer Breakfast yesterday regarding the U.S. obligation to deter genocide and human-rights violations against the LGBT people of Uganda.

    http://www.truthwinsout.org/blog/2010/02/6741/

    Clinton hails gay rights activists in wary Uganda
    http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/08/03/us-uganda-clinton-idUSBRE8721FH20120803

    Hillary Clinton's LGBT rights speech to the UN
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MudnsExyV78

    Posted by: rustytrawler | Mar 18, 2013 11:36:43 AM


  16. This isn't surprising news, but it's good news. To keep moving forward we need to keep our eye on the present and the future. She may not be in office at the moment, but her power is not diminished. Her support is valuable to us, and that is what matters.

    Posted by: Ernie | Mar 18, 2013 12:12:56 PM



  17. "Also @Don - & unless I missed her decision, she has not ruled out a run for the presidency in 2016, or for any other office for that matter. She does indeed have something to lose."

    I don't know whether she intends to run in 2016 or not but, let's be serious, if she does she not only has nothing to lose from announcing her support for marriage equality; it is indeed a political necessity. As Govs. Cuomo and O'Malley and Vice President Biden and others recognize, no one will have a shot at the 2016 Dem presidential nomination without supporting marriage equality. Based on what we saw during last year's presidential election and the trendlines in polling, support for equality is likely to be a plus in the general election as well. So while I agree that we can welcome the Secretary's support, let's not pretend that there's even the slightest possibility that it might come with any political risk to her.

    Posted by: Patric | Mar 18, 2013 12:16:18 PM


  18. Hillary has REPEATEDLY been outspoken about her support for gay rights, I mean she even says so in the first 5 seconds so this is hardly news. Typical moaning gays I swear...

    It's also really inaccurate to tag this video as "MUST-WATCH: Hillary Clinton finally comes out for marriage equality."

    All that being said, another video of her support for equal rights is nothing to be sniffed at. She is a fantastic human rights advocate and ally.

    Posted by: Cburg | Mar 18, 2013 12:39:48 PM


  19. The people that like her will always like her, and the ones that hate her will always hate her, so she really has nothing to lose.

    Posted by: Jack M | Mar 18, 2013 12:47:43 PM


  20. There is no reason not to criticize Hillary Clinton. She is late to the game just like her husband. I'm not sure I trust the ....me too....issue here. About a decade ago I saw a TV interview with Hillary and Elizabeth Warren (who new then about EW) regarding the impending changes to the federal bankruptcy laws. Elizabeth Warren desperately tried to inform Mrs. Clinton what changing the bankruptcy laws would do to the 'little guy'; and how the banks would be the ultimate winners if the laws were changed. Mrs. Clinton agreed that changing the laws would be a negative issue for the general public, etc., etc.. Later she realized her funding from the big banks towards her Senatorial campaign in NY state would be cut off if she voted against the new bankruptcy laws. She threw everyone under the bus and voted for the new laws. Along came 2007 & 2008 and we have seen how the new bankruptcy laws have aided the banks in their foreclosure schemes. Basically Hillary Clinton in a very subtle way handed Elizabeth Warren her political career because of that one vote she made. I realize all politicians manipulate and bargain through out there careers but wonder what the manipulation will be this time.

    Posted by: Jim | Mar 18, 2013 1:12:49 PM


  21. I really can't wrap my head around the folks trashing her for this brilliant, articulate message. There is no such thing as too little, too late. Rob Portman comes out for marriage equality because of a personal experience with a member of his family, enraging those in his party. He gets trashed for only supporting equality because it hit too close to home. How many normal, non-political families have had that exact same experience? Hillary just finished traveling the world for four years, witnessing firsthand atrocious human rights violations and not being able to do much about it. I don't think anybody would be able to witness what she has witnessed and not come out of it with a profound feeling that all humans should be treated equally. That being said, with a majority of Americans supporting marriage equality now, why do you think it impossible that she's one of the majority and instead she's just doing it to score political points? Anyone that speaks in support of equality, whether at a dinner table, a school, or in a national platform should be thanked, regardless of why you think they're supporting it. Anger and criticism should be saved for those that speak against equality.

    Posted by: AJ | Mar 18, 2013 2:00:59 PM


  22. Hilary initiated gay friendly rules for the State Department the moment she became Secretary of State. She has been a vocal advocate for GLBT at the UN. She has made numerous statements over the last ten years in support of gay issues. Some of you haven't been paying attention

    Posted by: candideinnc | Mar 18, 2013 2:06:21 PM


  23. Can ANY politician make this kind of speech WHILE running for office?

    Posted by: rick scatorum | Mar 18, 2013 2:13:08 PM


  24. I agree with some here, it would be nice to see someone triumphantly state they are for marriage equality while in office or running for office, and not be pressured into it or do so when they leave. But President Obama has come out for equality and the White House is doing it's job in seeing to it that DOMA/Prop 8 is repealed. Things are getting better on that front, slowly, but surely. Politicians know that the tide is turning on LGBT rights in general.

    Unfortunately, as we've seen in several states this year, supporting marriage equality and actually pushing on gay rights while IN office is a different matter entirely. Being voraciously anti-gay may not be accepted anymore but most legislators aren't going to fight for us, either. Like Rob Portman, they have a backstory for why they support marriage equality but don't really care about our community off of that. They're not allies. An ally takes a stand for our rights and fights with us, and for us. We need more true allies, not apathetic "I don't care if you're gay/who marries who/etc." types. We need more people who care.

    FWIW, Hillary I think fits that category, her 2011 UN speech is not forgotten by me and shouldn't be by others. She's our friend. Hopefully she runs in '16.

    Posted by: Francis | Mar 18, 2013 2:59:21 PM


  25. Tepid, conditional, done out of necessity? Exactly how does that apply to Hillary? There's absolutely nothing tepid about this (or her support for gay rights as Secretary of States, which by the way encompass far more than marriage equality, particularly in other parts of the world). There's nothing conditional here. She has nothing to lose by doing this, but she also would have no reason to do it were it not truly how she felt about this issue.

    I'm just sick of the skepticism. And even if the skepticism is warranted, her doing this is far more useful than not. So why complain about it? At least she didn't say she'd evolved on the issue like every other politician (including her husband) who have taken contrary stands on the issue.

    And I do not think it would be a requirement for the next Democratic presidential candidate to come out in support of marriage equality to win the nomination. Just because 58% of Americans support it does not mean it dictates who they vote for. I think it is inevitable they will since the party has actively embraced the platform for it. But I also think most of them who would run support it and have supported it in the past.

    While I certainly think rights are not something we have to ask for, does it hurt at all to be a little thankful to people for using their influence and their voice to speak out for us? Face it, anyoen who comes out for marriage equality from today forward is always going to be late to the table. But does that mean they should keep quiet?

    Everyone thinks this issue will be resolved soon and quickly in the courts. There is no guarantee, and frankly it is very unlikely, marriage equality will be ruled by the Court to be a fundamental right and therefore something states cannot constitutionally define so as to exclude gay couples. At best, DOMA is overturned and gay couples where married receive federal benefits. That still leave about 40 states where gays cannot. If people think this fight is really over, they have apparently never been to Alabama.

    We need all the support we can get. And we shouldn't condemn those who from this moment on decide to lend their voices and influence.

    Posted by: FancyPants | Mar 18, 2013 3:37:57 PM


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