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Two Men Plead Guilty to Federal Hate Crime Against Gay Man Outside Atlanta Grocery Store

Wshh

Many of you will recall this brutal attack outside an Atlanta grocery story (video at the link) in which a man was beaten while another laughed and repeated, "No faggots in Jack City."

CainThe two men responsible, Christopher Cain (pictured), 19, and Dorian Moragne, 20, both of Atlanta, pleaded guilty yesterday to a federal hate crime, the FBI reports:

“Hate-fueled violence will not be condoned,” said Roy L. Austin Jr., Deputy Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division. “The Justice Department will use all the tools in our law enforcement arsenal to investigate and prosecute hate crimes.”

“Using violence against another person because of his or her sexual orientation has no place in our civilized society. The Department of Justice is committed to aggressively enforcing the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act to prosecute acts motivated by hate,” said U.S. Attorney Sally Quillian Yates.

Cain and Moragne admitted to violating the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act, which expanded federal jurisdiction to include certain assaults motivated by the victim’s sexual orientation. The federal hate crimes law criminalizes certain acts of violence motivated by a victim’s actual or perceived race, color, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, disability, gender, or gender identity. This case is the first in Georgia to charge a violation of the sexual orientation provision of this federal hate crimes law.

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  1. No mention of a sentence. Please don't tell me they will be required to undergo community service for the Summer. They deserve no less than 10 years in Federal prison. Lompac, Folsom, San Quentin will do nicely.

    Posted by: Mike Ryan | Apr 19, 2013 1:57:25 PM


  2. Let's hope they don't plea bargain their way out of this. The boys in prison are going to love having these 2 for room mates.

    Posted by: Island Girly | Apr 19, 2013 2:04:17 PM


  3. I'm torn on this. Yes, they should be punished for beating the guy. Yes, they are horrible and blah blah blah. But, I can't turn a blind eye to the fact that the young man they beat was blackmailing them.

    Posted by: JP | Apr 19, 2013 2:06:39 PM


  4. Regarding the so-called "blackmail" excuse, if you're beating someone as the video showed because you're in the closet and you think they might out you, yes, that's easily a hate crime.

    Posted by: Randy | Apr 19, 2013 2:20:13 PM


  5. "But, I can't turn a blind eye to the fact that the young man they beat was blackmailing them."

    There was NO "blackmail". This was a LIE told by the thugs/attackers to try to discredit the victim, Brandon White.
    Mr. White did NOT know any of the men who attacked him prior to the attack.

    Posted by: edwin/elg | Apr 19, 2013 2:35:12 PM


  6. Just to clarify, both men have already been sentenced to 10 years in prison. They now could face additional time under the hate crimes law.

    Posted by: ScoobaSteve | Apr 19, 2013 2:43:17 PM


  7. First, Fulton County Superior Court Judge T. Jackson Bedford sentenced Christopher Cain, Dorian Moragne, and Darael Williams to five years in prison and five years probation for aggravated assault, street gang activity and robbery by force [The GA Voice]. The Federal Hate Crime sentencing to be announced.

    "But, I can't turn a blind eye to the fact that the young man they beat was blackmailing them."

    Expounding on what Edwin stated: that was an unproven allegation by gay “activists” in Atlanta without offering any proof other than the word of the defendants – noting one of the "activists" who accused White of lying backtracked [The GA Voice].

    It should also be noted that these “activists” met with the attackers' attorneys and family before trial and subsequently wrote a letter to the judge seeking the men be put on probation or serve community service rather than being sentenced to a lengthy prison term.

    Posted by: Belthazar | Apr 19, 2013 2:50:33 PM


  8. Need one say it?

    Posted by: David Hearne | Apr 19, 2013 2:55:44 PM


  9. Hagatha Hearne,

    what are doing posting on this event? You couldn't care less about the victim in this case. Need one say why?


    Mind your own hateful b.tch business.

    Posted by: Derrick from Philly | Apr 19, 2013 3:03:27 PM


  10. Oh okay, pardon my ignorance on the blackmailing charge. I just recall the allegation being made and the case disappearing.

    Posted by: JP | Apr 19, 2013 3:09:04 PM


  11. Derrick, I have never said anything which would support your belief that I don't care about the victims of black crime culture in America's cities.

    Posted by: David Hearne | Apr 19, 2013 3:28:29 PM


  12. It's not so much "black crime culture" as it is "perpetual poverty" that drives the violence in inner city areas. If you feel there is no one on your side and no hope of getting ahead and rising out of poverty, there will never be respect for rule of law. I could go into detail about how 300 years of slavery followed by roughly 100 more years of institutionalized racism created the cycle of so called "black crime culture" but I won't bother.

    What strikes me is how race can be used as a reason for bad behavior when discussing the crimes of people of color, yet when Jeremy Irons or any number of white men say and do deplorable things involving gay people, race never comes into it. It is so saddening and offensive, especially when coming from gay lips (or fingertips in this case), we should know better!

    Posted by: cdubois | Apr 19, 2013 4:39:09 PM


  13. cdubois - You're babbling incoherently.

    Posted by: David Hearne | Apr 19, 2013 7:04:26 PM


  14. Okay : ) Hopefully one day you will find what you need buddy!

    Posted by: cdubois | Apr 19, 2013 8:01:53 PM


  15. cdubois-

    Poverty is neither a reason nor an excuse for crime. The idea that poverty would explain the spectrum of violent crime emanating from black America is absurd and demonstrably false. The major dispositive would be found in rural black communities and communities where blacks are less than statistical representation. You will not, for example, see in the black people in my neighborhood the sort of behaviors which make black neighborhoods less desirable. They do not hang out on street corners, blast music from front porches, entertain in the front yard, or tolerate the street action commonly found in black communities which have high crime rates.

    Also, even if we were to allow that poverty and lack of opportunity were to blame for black property crimes, it doesn't explain the exponential disproportion of rapes committed by black men in general, and the off the scale rapes of white women by black men relative to the dearth of black women raped by white men.

    Posted by: David Hearne | Apr 19, 2013 8:44:08 PM


  16. You're misusing the word dispositive. It's an adjective and should be modifying a noun or pronoun. : ) Also, I never said poverty is the sole cause nor is it specific to the black community. But what do I know? I babble to much

    Posted by: cdubois | Apr 19, 2013 9:11:23 PM


  17. *too haha

    Posted by: cdubois | Apr 19, 2013 9:11:53 PM


  18. OK, I'll bite. cdubois and David Hearne are both right.

    Less than Reader's Digest version: Hundreds of years of slavery which stripped black people of self respect, concepts of society, ability to achieve skills like literacy and respect for learning, etc. Then incredible levels of institutionalized racism (particularly where they mostly lived, in the South).
    Then employment in factories drawing black people out of the South starting in WWII - which later disappeared.

    Then the really big mistakes - ideas which seemed humane at the time - which no one since Moynihan wants to talk about: Welfare in all its forms and public housing. Continuing people in a culture of dependency and concentrating the multigenerational disfunction in isolation.

    It doesn't excuse anything but this has all resulted is really perhaps the biggest problem in our country today - social dysfunction in mostly the black community.

    Posted by: emjayay | Apr 20, 2013 1:22:27 AM


  19. Girls, girls! Stop fighting! We have enough going against us as it is! Lock those idiots up. sadly there are millions of other hateful people just like them out there waiting for me and you! Chicago area here, originally from Philadelphia...

    Posted by: billmiller | Apr 20, 2013 6:09:53 AM


  20. I'm new to the party. Is David Hearne some kind of resident racist? Someone update me.

    Posted by: Sam | Apr 20, 2013 8:10:33 AM


  21. Island Girly, please spare us the predictable quips about how the offenders will get what they deserve from "roommates." Prison rape is a horrible scourge, not a laughing matter. In a civilized society, punishment is meted out by the judicial system, not by gang violence.

    Posted by: DW | Apr 20, 2013 9:30:58 AM


  22. Island Girly, please spare us the predictable quips about how the offenders will get what they deserve from "roommates." Prison rape is a horrible scourge, not a laughing matter. In a civilized society, punishment is meted out by the judicial system, not by gang violence.

    Posted by: DW | Apr 20, 2013 9:31:19 AM


  23. Posted by: emjayay | Apr 20, 2013 1:22:27 AM

    "Less than Reader's Digest version: Hundreds of years of slavery which stripped black people of self respect, concepts of society, ability to achieve skills like literacy and respect for learning, etc. "

    The context for the current state of the black community isn't slavery. You are skipping over an equally long period in which blacks were statistically less likely to be in prison, less likely to be unmarried, less likely to commit acts of violence outside their community, less likely to commit crimes inside their community. While "the 1950's" might not have actually been the good old days by many measures, the black community looked a lot better on paper (if not bank paper) than it does now.

    "Then incredible levels of institutionalized racism (particularly where they mostly lived, in the South)."

    Racism and apartheid was hardly limited to the South.

    "Then the really big mistakes - ideas which seemed humane at the time - which no one since Moynihan wants to talk about: Welfare in all its forms and public housing. Continuing people in a culture of dependency and concentrating the multigenerational disfunction in isolation."

    I don't think they were humane at all. I think that welfare was a sinister concept based in a sound understanding of class warfare. Hungry people fight. Homeless people fight. Give the poor black folks just enough to keep them too comfortable to fight, give them just enough that they fear losing what they have and the riots and fires stop.

    The sinister benefit to public housing is that it creates a permanent poverty zone and disrupts the natural market and coming and going of real estate. So by dedicating Anacostia and Prince Georges County as the permanent poverty zone, you guarantee that housing in Chevy Chase and Montgomery County will skyrocket.

    "It doesn't excuse anything but this has all resulted is really perhaps the biggest problem in our country today - social dysfunction in mostly the black community."

    Willing pawns.

    Posted by: David Hearne | Apr 20, 2013 11:42:18 AM


  24. Sam - Point out where I have said something which is not true.

    Posted by: David Hearne | Apr 20, 2013 11:45:45 AM


  25. These guys got 5 years from state court with an additional 5 years probation. They will get additional time from the federal charges which will start at the end of the 5+ years. They will be away for a while.

    Posted by: Dan | Apr 21, 2013 10:12:13 AM


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