Comments

  1. Jeff says

    This movie looks really grotesque.
    It’s an embarrassment to the gay community, especially since neither the director or any of the actors involved are gay. It’s serving up another freak show view of gays and lesbians. Wish you’d stop promoting it here.

  2. TONEZ says

    wow @Jeff you come off as someone who really hates himself. Just like Liberace. Did you audition for this movie? Must all movies about gay people be completely serious and everyone wears grey? Liberace was literally like this. They aren’t exasperating anything. I look foreword into diving into this perspective of his life.

  3. Jason says

    Jeff, ask yourself if the film ‘Sid & Nancy’ was ever considered an embarrassment to the heterosexual community and I think you’ll uncover some problems with your statement.

  4. Kent says

    Couldn’t disagree more,Jeff. Thank goodness no one will force you to watch it. Liberace’s showmanship fascinates because its extremity seems to predict failure, but his success and popularity were huge. Who can blame him for not wanting to risk throwing that away? His personal life was not easy and I think you’re being rather quick in your rush to judgement. As for the director and actors being straight: having played straight characters and directed plays that were lock, stock and barrel about straing people, I can tell you for a fact that a talented theatre artist isn’t limited by his or her sexuality.

  5. woodroad34d says

    You forgot to mention that Cheyenne Jackson plays Billy Leatherwood (whom I didn’t recognize when I saw a preview DVD last Sunday)or that Scot Backula plays the choreographer who introduces Scot Thorson to Liberace. It’s a campy film, not unlike “Mommy Dearest” and Michael Douglas and Matt Damon really show a relaltionship (and one particular scene where ‘Liberace’ gives it up to ‘Scott’). Debbie Reynolds is unrecognizable, as well as Momma. It’s actually fun.

  6. will says

    Can we please call a moratorium on a gay man telling another that he is “self-hating” when one merely dislikes the comment? I have been called a self-hating gay man here. Every other thread seems to have references to self-hating gay men. It’s getting tired and lazy.

  7. scooterzz says

    i watched a screener last night and thought it was an absolute hoot…it kinda felt like soderbergh was channeling ross hunter….

  8. candideinnc says

    I reserve comment on the film. On Liberace, however, he was a clown who demanded to remain in the closet while playing as close to a drag queen as was legal in his day.

  9. ED says

    This film looks amazing. Having experienced those years at an early age it was honestly more fun when being gay was forbidden. It was like being part of an exclusive club. I got to see gays come out through the decades as well. Today’s version of gay is a bad mutation of heterosexuality. A perfect reason to get beat up.

  10. MarkSquared says

    Oh Jeff, this movie looks like great fun. Not only that, it looks like there’s maybe a chance to show just how awful society made things for gay people and perhaps remind how far we’ve come. That said, I won’t defend the movie until I’ve actually seen it, but from this and the trailer, it looks like it should be quite good.

  11. bandanajack says

    i say this often, if only to make myself believe it. i am 70 years old. i grew up watching liberace’s tv show (with george)and as with many men, especially those who had a secret (even from themselves), i was both intrigued and appalled by liberace. as one who knew and appreciated great music at an early age, i knew the artistry involved, but the opulence and strangely cadenced speech were seriously off-putting. i would never admit that i watched the show, and i wasn’t a fan of his more honky tonk numbers, despite the incredible virtuosity playing them.

    in later years i gave him grudging respect for having it his own way and flipping the bird, literally and figuratively at the society which reviled him, and he laughed, as he often said he cried, all the way to the bank. i’m a little concerned that this is going to come off as a vanity piece, because both douglas and damon are too old for their parts, and douglas simply cannot master that southern honey dripping accent of liberace. time will tell, but i will still recommend viewing the original for comparison.

  12. rickyzoo says

    the problem with our some of our community’s members (which is what jeff is guilty of) is that we still frame our judgments of other homos and how we are represented based on the establishment or heterosexual standards. heteros are no better than us the same way we are no better than they are. WE ARE ALL FLAWED, WE JUST HAVE DIFFERENT PREFERENCES. DUH.

  13. Bob says

    I can hardly wait!
    Both Douglas and Matt look amazing
    and it’s high time that tribute was
    paid to a great artist and entertainer
    who made millions of people happy.
    Bah humbug to the haters.

  14. Squirt says

    I’m with Jeff — soooo tired of watching straight actors portray gay men. It’s like watching white actors in blackface. Don’t they have any gay actors in Hollywood? Do they think we can’t tell the difference? It’s plastic and fake.

  15. leprechaunvict says

    Note to Bandana Jack: Liberace was from Milwaukee, hence no southern accent. Also to Jeff: some, not all, but some gay men are pretty queeny. Making a movie about one does no disservice to the gay community.

  16. Jim Brown says

    I saw Liberace in concert with my entire family when I was about 12 years old. He was, indeed, fabulous. One of the greatest showmen who has ever lived. It is true that he was not “out” but everyone really knew that he was gay (homosexual as they said then) and no one, at least in the audience, could have cared less. He was deeply, deeply loved. As long as the story being told here is the truth, and it looks like it is as far as I can tell, I don’t care WHO plays them, because it is really about THEM and not the actors. Liberace was a pioneer way before the current flood of “out” personalities in the news today. I miss him.

  17. Leroy Laflamme says

    Don’t want to start anything, but I have a problem with this ‘gay community’ concept. And now I’ve just come across the term ‘heterosexual community’. Are all Italian people in the the world an Italian community? Is there a serial killer community? I’m not sure the dictionary definition of ‘community’ supports the notion that every gay person on the planet is part of one community. I’m happy as a clam being gay but I sure as heck don’t want to be lumped with a group of people solely for the reason that the common denominator is their sexual preference.

  18. Leroy Laflamme says

    Don’t want to start anything, but I have a problem with this ‘gay community’ concept. And now I’ve just come across the term ‘heterosexual community’. Are all Italian people in the the world an Italian community? Is there a serial killer community? I’m not sure the dictionary definition of ‘community’ supports the notion that every gay person on the planet is part of one community. I’m happy as a clam being gay but I sure as heck don’t want to be lumped with a group of people solely for the reason that the common denominator is their sexual preference.

  19. says

    @squirt: why should gay characters only be played by gay actors? Does it mean that gay actors shouldn’t be allowed to play straight roles either? Following your logic, only Liberace should be allowed to play himself.. They are ACTORS. Their sexuality doesn’t interfere with their acting skills. You don’t need to really be an astronaut, an alien or a rapist to play one, right? You need to be able to act the part. I’m really looking forwards to seeing this movie (although I wonder if it will be possible here, I’m in Belgium, therefore the probable english mistakes, sorry :)) the level of details in costumes and scenery looks stunning to me and the acting looks flawless so far!

  20. jsb says

    I met Liberace, and can say that he was a very quiet, sweet man offstage. It was Dallas, in the 1980s, he was in town on a concert tour, wearing a tan jumpsuit with way too much fabulous jewelry, but utterly charming. The driver was in an over the top uniform. I was working men’s wear retail, Liberace came in, bought a ton of pjs and robes, then the store manager (big old queen!) came to the department and made a big deal about “Mr. Liberace”, Liberace changed into the stage persona that we all remember, still very nice, but he was “ON”, it was like someone through a switch, the change was instantaneous.

    Having been to the Liberace Museum in Las Vegas (now closed) the costuming looks spot on, as do the cars, etc. To bad they didn’t use his actual home in Palm Springs (where he died), it was a trip, there were still plastic rose blossoms wired to all the rose bushes, so the roses whould always be in bloom when he looked out. Liberace was one of a kind.

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