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Bradley Manning Apologizes To Judge

Last month, Pfc Bradley Manning was found guilty of 20 of the 22 charges against him, but was found not guilty of the most serious charge - that of "aiding the enemy." On Wednesday, the Wikileaks soldier read a lengthy statement to the army judge assigned to his case, Col. Denise Lind, in which he apologized for his actions.

Said Manning:

6a00d8341c730253ef0192ac45ac2a970d-250wiI am sorry for the unintended consequences of my actions. When I made these decisions I believed I was going to help people, not hurt people. The last few years have been a learning experience. I look back at my decisions and wonder how on earth could I, a junior analyst, possibly believe I could change the world for the better (unintelligible) on decisions of those with the proper authority.

In retrospect, I should have worked more aggressively inside the system, as we discussed during the provenance statement. I had options, and I should have used these options. Unfortunately, I can't go back and change things. I can only go forward. I want to go forward. Before I can do that, I understand that I must pay a price for my decisions and actions.

Manning, who faces up to 90 years, minus time served, will very likely learn his sentence from Judge Lind next week.

Read his full apology, AFTER THE JUMP.

"First, your honor, I want to start off with an apology. I am sorry that my actions hurt people. I'm sorry that they hurt the United States.

At the time of my decisions, as you know, I was dealing with a lot of issues, issues that are ongoing and continuing to affect me. Although a considerable difficulty in my life, these issues are not an excuse for my actions.

I understood what I was doing, and decisions I made. However, I did not fully appreciate the broader effects of my actions.

Those factors are clear to me now, through both self-refection during my confinement in various forms, and through the merits and sentencing testimony that I have seen here.

I am sorry for the unintended consequences of my actions. When I made these decisions I believed I was going to help people, not hurt people.

The last few years have been a learning experience. I look back at my decisions and wonder how on earth could I, a junior analyst, possibly believe I could change the world for the better (unintelligible) on decisions of those with the proper authority.

In retrospect, I should have worked more aggressively inside the system, as we discussed during the provenance statement. I had options, and I should have used these options.

Unfortunately, I can't go back and change things. I can only go forward. I want to go forward. Before I can do that, I understand that I must pay a price for my decisions and actions.

Once I pay that price, I hope to one day live in a manner that I haven't been able to in the past. I want to be a better person, to go to college, to get a degree and to have a meaningful relationship with my sister, with my sister's family and my family.

I want to be a positive influence in their lives, just as my Aunt Debra has been to me. I have flaws and issues that I have to deal with, but I know that I can and will be a better person.

I hope that you can give me the opportunity to prove, not through words, but through conduct, that I am a good person and that I can return to a productive place in society. Thank you, your honor."

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Comments

  1. I hope he gets leniency. His statement is sincere and I have no doubt he means well. There is nothing to be gained with depriving Manning of his future. Best of luck to him.

    Posted by: Rafael | Aug 17, 2013 11:04:03 AM


  2. Give the guy time served and let him go. Enough already. The military has persecuted this guy without mercy and he doesn't deserve the horrible treatment he's already been afforded.

    Posted by: Mike Ryan | Aug 17, 2013 11:34:51 AM


  3. A sad story of a young man's life ruined. The statement is of course designed to get him a lenient sentence. I'm not saying he isn't sincere, just saying. Basically, he;s begging fro forgiveness. He'll get a long prison sentence IMHO, so I think his statement should have been less grovelling and he should have stuck more to his guns. I may not believe what he did was the correct thing to do, but I'd respect him and his legal team more if they had been a little less grovelling. And probably Manning now realizes his 'friends' and others who were glad to use what he did for their own ideological and political purposes have really no interest in him and his fate. It must have sobered him up.

    Posted by: ratbastard | Aug 17, 2013 11:35:30 AM


  4. This is what Stockholm Syndrome looks like.

    Posted by: Acronym Jim | Aug 17, 2013 12:21:47 PM


  5. He will be made an example of and will be in prison for the rest of his life.

    On the bright side, his "pu$$y" will get a daily work-out from buff, young studs....so at least all his deepest sexual fantasies will be realized.....and I guess that is something to live for.

    Posted by: Rick | Aug 17, 2013 12:36:26 PM


  6. I consider Bradley Manning a whistleblower. Silly me, I have this weird idea that we have a right to know what OUR government is doing. And to hope that he gets raped in prison for the rest of his life is inexcusable. Yes, he's had his punishment. Has anyone read what he went through while he's been imprisoned? He's been punished enough. Let him go.

    Posted by: Terry | Aug 17, 2013 1:00:03 PM


  7. TERRY, agree.

    Posted by: Rob West | Aug 17, 2013 1:06:12 PM


  8. The more I learn about this dude, the less I think of him as a hero. He may have done the right thing RE whistleblowing, but his motivations were confused at best. And a true hero would not apologize. Shame on the Radiqueer Left for trying to shove Bradley Manning down everybody's throat as a Gay role model and icon! At this point, I'm not even sure calling him a Gay man is accurate.

    Posted by: Stuffed Animal | Aug 17, 2013 1:16:34 PM


  9. Rick - projecting his own fantasies onto others since 1948.

    Posted by: Acronym Jim | Aug 17, 2013 1:18:06 PM


  10. http://fablog.ehrensteinland.com/2013/08/15/fait-diver-bradley-and-the-syndromes/

    Posted by: David Ehrenstein | Aug 17, 2013 2:25:35 PM


  11. Terry, he's not a whistleblower because 99.9% of what he leaked had nothing to do with any alleged illegality or wrondgoing and in all but a few instances he didn't even read what he was leaking. There is no generic right to know the content of dipolomatic cables in any nation in the world.

    Posted by: Steve | Aug 17, 2013 2:39:31 PM


  12. Oh, hey, sorry I destroyed the confidentiality of diplomatic communications and thereby undermined the ability of nations to resolve their differences nonviolently. So sorry. Yeah, sorry I leaked confidential military information that was later culled and compiled for personal review by Osama bin Laden, as was revealed at trial.

    But hey, it was a learning experience for me, a transwoman. So it all evens out, right?

    Classic sociopathic behavior and mentality by a transgender.

    Posted by: Tobin | Aug 17, 2013 2:43:12 PM


  13. The remarks from the cowardly little toadies here disgust me.

    What he leaked proves we've been lied to, and that the US is doing sleazy things. Just because you are too lazy to look at any of it or read what anyone critical of the government has to say about what he leaked doesn't automatically make everything he leaked innocent or legal. You weasels.

    Torturing him and drugging him to get a "confession" is one thing; advocating for this and being OK with it - well that just makes all of you pure, evil SCUM.

    Most of you truly deserve to die in a fire.

    Posted by: Pookie | Aug 17, 2013 3:15:58 PM


  14. Cane him.

    Posted by: Hagatha | Aug 17, 2013 3:50:02 PM


  15. Said it before, he's a scapegoat.

    Someone with such a low rank should never have been able to walk out with such little effort with so many (supposedly) important documents.

    That everyone all along the military chain of command that failed to do the most fundamental job of securing that data failed, so spectacularly, is the real story here. The story that everyone is totally ignoring.

    Oh yeah, that and that quite a bit of what was leaked just goes to show how the US is little piggy in the middle of all sorts of nasty and internationally criminal enterprises that it seems most of our media refuses to pay any attention to at all.

    Yeah, he was young and idealistic, and looks pretty pathetic, after spending a long time already in the extreme confines of a military prison. You expected him to be defiant looking at 90 years in there ? I have to laugh out loud. He's already sacrificed his life for an ideal of transparency and accountability that most people in the US have long since abandoned for convenience and the illusion afforded by rampant and nauseatingly twisted forms of nationalism and patriotism.

    Posted by: Buckie | Aug 17, 2013 4:21:55 PM


  16. Pfc Manning shows more good sense now than many of his supporters. He seriously violated his responsibilities as a member of the U.S. Army, and I think he should serve some significant prison time. Maybe a term until he is in his mid thirties. That will allow him, at a young age, to achieve those goals he mentions.

    Posted by: andrew | Aug 17, 2013 5:21:19 PM


  17. Rick, your jealousy is apparent.

    Posted by: Sam | Aug 17, 2013 6:44:03 PM


  18. No mercy, why should he get off just for saying he's sorry let him rot!

    Posted by: Lee | Aug 18, 2013 1:00:01 AM


  19. PFC Bradley Manning is but one of a growing number of truth-telling scapegoats who are exposing the wretched underbelly of a government (regardless of administration or majority party) run amok with power, fear, excess and undue influence domestically and internationally. While he is guilty, PFC Manning graciously expresses his remorse and his naïveté. I have little doubt that, had he known in advance what he'd learn as a volunteer soldier, he would not have joined the U.S. military.

    Posted by: Koskalaka Maricón | Aug 18, 2013 11:09:49 AM


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