Tomorrowland’s Forecast: Spending Your Future Holidays with the Robot Relatives – VIDEO

The first step of creating an artificial mind or consciousness is to draft a blueprint of our own brain, an undertaking that has already began at the University of California, Los Angeles. On the first episode of the Science Channel's new six-part series Futurescape that aired last week, host James Woods dived into the Human Connectome Project, this colossal effort to map the connections between neurons that underlay all brain functions. 

As the ethicist at the end of the clip states, however, developing conscious AI would also bring up complex questions about how humanity would react to these robots and may even cause us to question what it means to be human in the first place. After all, if this machine consciousness includes the ability to feel emotions and suffering, shouldn't certain rights be given to them? The right to be protected against cruel punishment or torture seems reasonable. But what about the right to property? Or, as James Woods entertains in the clip below, the idea that robots may one day even have the right to vote?

I'll admit that while the idea of consciousness ever being placed in a machine seems pretty fanciful, it's important to put our own planet's history of life into perspective. Many scientists postulate that our living, breathing, thinking species can be traced all the way back to a "primordial soup" of organic compounds that eventually gave rise to amino acids, the building blocks of life. And it goes without saying that this primordial soup had about as much consciousness as a bowl of my mom's turkey noodle soup. So somewhere along the timeline, self-awareness came into being.

Is it that much of a stretch to think that the same might be true for technology?

Futurescape, hosted by James Woods airs Tuesdays @ 10pm on the Science Channel

News tips? Comments/Suggestions? Tweet me @kylergee

[robotics pic courtesy of CISD]  

Comments

  1. Gregg says

    Yes. Creating robot slaves will turn out great. Look at how well turning humans into slaves has turned out.

    Nothing terrible will happen when everyone has a robot slave in her home.

    Seriously, people need to get over having thinking machines as servants. It’s inherently evil. Also, what happens to the humans who depend on the jobs doing domestic work??

    If machine can be taught to be a domestic servant, what job can’t it do eventually? Doctor, lawyer, stockbroker? What jobs will be left for humans?

    Technology is a tool to be used for both good and evil. It does not bring utopia by itself.

  2. Gregg says

    Yes. Creating robot slaves will turn out great. Look at how well turning humans into slaves has turned out.

    Nothing terrible will happen when everyone has a robot slave in her home.

    Seriously, people need to get over having thinking machines as servants. It’s inherently evil. Also, what happens to the humans who depend on the jobs doing domestic work??

    If machine can be taught to be a domestic servant, what job can’t it do eventually? Doctor, lawyer, stockbroker? What jobs will be left for humans?

    Technology is a tool to be used for both good and evil. It does not bring utopia by itself.

  3. Gregg says

    Yes. Creating robot slaves will turn out great. Look at how well turning humans into slaves has turned out.

    Nothing terrible will happen when everyone has a robot slave in her home.

    Seriously, people need to get over having thinking machines as servants. It’s inherently evil. Also, what happens to the humans who depend on the jobs doing domestic work??

    If machine can be taught to be a domestic servant, what job can’t it do eventually? Doctor, lawyer, stockbroker? What jobs will be left for humans?

    Technology is a tool to be used for both good and evil. It does not bring utopia by itself.

  4. Gregg says

    Yes. Creating robot slaves will turn out great. Look at how well turning humans into slaves has turned out.

    Nothing terrible will happen when everyone has a robot slave in her home.

    Seriously, people need to get over having thinking machines as servants. It’s inherently evil. Also, what happens to the humans who depend on the jobs doing domestic work??

    If machine can be taught to be a domestic servant, what job can’t it do eventually? Doctor, lawyer, stockbroker? What jobs will be left for humans?

    Technology is a tool to be used for both good and evil. It does not bring utopia by itself.

  5. jamal49 says

    All I had to do was see “Halliburton” in the small photo to say to myself “not interested”.

  6. Vera says

    Despite being a massive fan of science fiction the technological ‘Singularity’ or the blurring of machine and organic intelligence is very, very, very improbable and based on wishful and selective thinking and research advocated by 1 man that later influenced a nascent movement. The very ethics and philosophy of the root of computationalism (The philosophy that compares the human brain to a computer) are also inhertently dangerous in that they place the same value of the ‘born’ as that of the ‘created’, when even in everyday situations we know that is not so.

    Overall though, I’m not very concerned about free-thinking artificial intelligences that are placed in human like bodies, because the idea simply isn’t likely.