Comments

  1. Kevin says

    I’m as angry about the India ruling as the next guy. But no one really saw this coming so it’s a bit ridiculous to expect the State Department to have a response within hours ESPECIALLY when you’re talking about a relationship with the second most populous country in the world. Push for action, but give it a chance first.

  2. Mike Ryan says

    Boycott anything India. Spend no money on any product made in India. Refuse to utilize or work with ANY company that hires or contracts with Indian citizens. Avoid traveling to India. If India thinks they have poverty now we can ensure that poverty continues and grows worse.

  3. brian1 says

    @Mike Ryan

    That is such a terrible reaction to this decision. First, it’s just two old men who decided this, yet you want to make a billion people suffer for it. Second, and more importantly, they wouldn’t suffer that much, as India is one of the least export oriented of the major economies. Call centres, for example, are about 1 percent of GDP. Third, and most importantly, there probably isn’t a big company in America that doesn’t have an Indian employee in the world. Certainly every single food and beverage, technology, financial services, pharmaceutical company would have to be boycotted at a bare minimum. Good luck with that.

  4. andrew says

    Our State Department’s response to the action of the Indian Supreme Court recriminalizing sodomy has to be tempered by the ugly reality that sodomy was a crime in the USA until recently.

  5. Bill says

    @brian1: in addition, nobody is talking about the reason for the ruling. You can find a summary of the decision at http://www.dnaindia.com/india/report-highlights-of-the-supreme-court-verdict-on-section-377-1933492 and it appears that the court merely ruled that it was constitutional, not that it was a good law.

    They pointed out that in 150 years, only 200 individuals have been prosecuted under Section
    377 (the part being contested. The court also claimed that “The mere fact that the section is misused by police authorities and others is not a reflection of the vires of the section. It might be a relevant factor for the Legislature to consider while judging the desirability of amending Section 377 of the IPC.”

    So, it appears the court merely ruled that the law was constitutional, and that it was up to the legislature to change it.

  6. FFS says

    The irony, of course, being that the USA itself has no shortage of laws denying equality to LGBT citizens.

    Yet another reason for us to get our house in order. LGBT inequality, here at home, hampers our credibility in addressing human rights issues abroad.

  7. MaryM says

    India’s shameful and disgusting and savage decision to roll back human rights clearly proves that India is not fit for purpose as a major power.

    Divestiture from India needs to be promoted.

    India is a disgrace.

  8. Chaz says

    The Indian Ruling is Putin. Simple as that. Russia leaned on the Indian government and today he’s swaggering around pointing at India and saying that he and Russia are the defenders of traditional values worldwide. It’s a power grab. Putin is aligning Russia at the head of a new, global, anti-American, anti-Western alliance that will push into Asia, Africa and India.

  9. chasmader says

    It’s pretty simple folks:

    NO $$$ to anything from India.

    If you get Sanjay at a call center, demand to speak with a native speaking American.

    No Indian Cars and that means no Mini’s or Rovers as they’re now Indian owned.

    And no more Visas to Indian Tech Monkeys.

  10. Brian1 says

    @Roger

    Mike Ryan is definitely not lampooning the Russian boycott. He is the main proponent of the Russian boycott on dozens of posts here so i don’t see him poking fun at it. Unless this is a pretender posting under his name, I’m sure he really means we should do this with India.

  11. George Brock says

    My immediate reaction is to boycott India. Show them the power of the purse. Also, support the Indian LGBT community and get them to petition the Indian legislature to change the law. As Americans who had to fight similar anti-gay laws we can help the Indians. We Shall Overcome!

  12. andrew says

    @MARYM: Come down out of your righteous pulpit. India is “shameful, disgusting, savage, disgrace” Yea just like the USA a decade or two ago. Get some perspective!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  13. andrew says

    When you are U.S. Sec of State representing a nation that is occupying land taken from the Native population and in fact caused the deaths of millions of those people, you have to tip toe into that righteous pulpit. We are very much like Germany trying to tell nations how to treat their minority populations. We benefit from the fact that humans have short memories and most of our sins were committed in the last century or before.

  14. j says

    y do dont u all just mind ur own business u cnt force every country in tha world to allow gays ok some countries r very relgiious n one more thing gays r the lowest level on social problem in india. india has been attackin/killin monorites for so long now n they come first before india cn tackle its gay issue

  15. manj says

    As a gay Indian living in NYC (and a Tech gay monkey as someone referred to above), the comments here are a bit over the top (also a bit hateful, especially considering that gays were the hated).

    – Yes, I’m angry at the verdict. It is stupid and archaic.

    – Boycotting Indian goods/produce won’t work. It didn’t work when the US imposed sanction 15 years ago for nuclear testing.

    – A lot of Indians are still wary of the West. (Don’t blame them, they were ruled by the Brits for over 200 years and it is only 60+ years since we got independence). Luckily, though Hinduism (which is majority religion) has its share of stupid things, it isn’t as bad as Christianity when it comes to homosexuality (or abortion).

    – I hope those calling for boycott of goods aren’t advocating boycotting goods from US states that still prohibit gay marriage.

    – Talk to your reps & senators to lean on or nudge the Indian leaders (political or Industrial) to change the law.

    – Support Indian LGBT groups (Please be nice to each other – too much to ask?).

    Lastly, it is not the end of the world. Clearly, the judges are on the wrong side here. This too shall pass.

  16. Kevin says

    @brian1

    You bring up a good point, but it’s important to realize that official prosecution and conviction isn’t necessarily representative of reality. I do HIV prevention research, including some projects in India. Harassment from police continues to be a major barrier to our work, but its a huge problem just for the daily lives of men who have sex with men in India. Men found cruising are routinely beaten, asked to “move along”, locked up for a night with no charges. This did not really substantively change (at least in the city I do research) when gay sex was decriminalized. A major problem is police are not aware of what the laws actually are and stigma of homosexuality means that few men are empowered to do anything about it. Protest would only draw attention to them and many (most) men are closeted. I’m not really sure what this Supreme Court ruling means in reality, but it is not positive in the best case scenario. It’s just important to remember that the actual law or reported convictions under a law are not always representative of reality. There certainly is no hope for progress in acceptance when the laws on the books make that progress illegal.

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