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Pew Looks at Global Views on the Morality of Homosexuality

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Pew has released a new survey that looks at global attitudes on eight topics often discussed as moral issues, homosexuality among them.

The survey found that homosexuality, along with gambling and extramarital affairs, were the three issues deemed “morally unacceptable” by the largest number of respondents.

Screen Shot 2014-04-23 at 11.11.19 AMPew reports:

Half or more in most of the 40 nations polled say that homosexuality is unacceptable. Nine-in-ten or more hold this view in seven nations. However, Europeans are much less likely to say homosexuality is unacceptable – this is especially true in Spain, Germany, the Czech Republic, France, Britain, and Italy, where about 20% or fewer express this opinion.

In the United States, 37% of respondents believe that homosexuality is “morally unacceptable,” 23% believe it is “morally acceptable,” and 35% believe homosexuality is not a issue of morality.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the survey also found that Republicans are more likely to view many of these issues as unacceptable.

Screen Shot 2014-04-23 at 11.13.24 AMThere are partisan divides in the U.S. on 5 of the 8 questions between Republicans and Democrats. This tracks with each party’s views on social issues, with Republicans generally considered more socially conservative and Democrats as more socially liberal. For instance, while 68% of Republicans believed that abortion is morally unacceptable, only 39% of Democrats said the same. Similar gaps appeared on the issues of homosexuality, premarital sex, and divorce. There was a smaller partisan gap on extramarital affairs, with little partisan differences on gambling, contraceptives, and alcohol — all of which are generally seen as morally acceptable or not a moral issue by Republicans, Democrats, and independents.

Check out all the survey's findings here

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Comments

  1. Yikes. Pew is a well-funded, well-known organization with a lot of smart employees, but the writing in those excerpts and the underlying links is really bad---inconsistent wording, flat-out wrong word usage, and an overall clunkiness that I wouldn't expect to be the summary of such a massive survey (more than 330,000 people!). Given the amount of money they spent conducting the survey, you'd think they could have set some aside for a decent editor.

    I'm not even being particularly picky...there's just something wrong with every single sentence in the two paragraphs cited above, and the site is similarly riddled with errors and awkwardness. It makes it hard to take the survey findings too seriously.

    Posted by: Paul R | Apr 23, 2014 4:06:04 PM


  2. Yikes. Pew is a well-funded, well-known organization with a lot of smart employees, but the writing in those excerpts and the underlying links is really bad---inconsistent wording, flat-out wrong word usage, and an overall clunkiness that I wouldn't expect to be the summary of such a massive survey (more than 330,000 people!). Given the amount of money they spent conducting the survey, you'd think they could have set some aside for a decent editor.

    I'm not even being particularly picky...there's just something wrong with every single sentence in the two paragraphs cited above, and the site is similarly riddled with errors and awkwardness. It makes it hard to take the survey findings too seriously.

    Posted by: Paul R | Apr 23, 2014 4:06:05 PM


  3. Yikes. Pew is a well-funded, well-known organization with a lot of smart employees, but the writing in those excerpts and the underlying links is really bad---inconsistent wording, flat-out wrong word usage, and an overall clunkiness that I wouldn't expect to be the summary of such a massive survey (more than 330,000 people!). Given the amount of money they spent conducting the survey, you'd think they could have set some aside for a decent editor.

    I'm not even being particularly picky...there's just something wrong with every single sentence in the two paragraphs cited above, and the site is similarly riddled with errors and awkwardness. It makes it hard to take the survey findings too seriously.

    Posted by: Paul R | Apr 23, 2014 4:06:18 PM


  4. whatever. I do chuckle that the only thing Republicans are less morally outraged at than Democrats is alcohol use. I know it isn't statistically significant, but I guess they gotta do something to suppress the urges.

    Posted by: rjinva | Apr 23, 2014 5:08:04 PM


  5. The problem with these surveys is the limited scope of moral questions asked. What about the basics like lying, stealing, murder, abandoning/abusing children? When dressed up on hypotheticals you can really get to the nub of the moral center of the person.

    Posted by: anon | Apr 24, 2014 12:15:30 AM


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