Comments

  1. woody says

    I don’t know, it always troubles me that the great majority of the bollywood beauty queens and kings are fair and look Persian or Italian. Yes, they are pretty, but there are pretty dark people too.

  2. spg says

    Disclaimer, I do not know anything about Indian or Bollywood culture. But I have a question, is that a stereotypical fantasy of a wedding celebration? What cultural or group is this video targeted at? Just curious.

  3. mcgill says

    @Woody

    There is a fair amount of stigma against dark skinned people in India – just like in America. Bollywood and Hollywood reflect that.

  4. UFFDA says

    This is rather momentous, especially for India and everywhere else where BABIES ARE MANDATORY and tradition is everything.

    Three cheers for a changing world!

  5. Gregory In Seattle says

    @Woody – India is actually quite racist.

    It is the result of the Indo-Aryan migrations 3,500 years ago, which established the caste system which put the lighter skinned European invaders at the top and the darker skinned indigenous people at the bottom. This attitude was reinforced during the Raj, when British racism consistently put people with lighter skin into positions of power and authority while ignoring those with darker skin.

    The end result has been a very strong, millennium old link between a family’s wealth and power, and the color of their skin. Bollywood actors are typically lighter skinned because they are the ones with the resources to study acting, dance and music. The characters they pay are typically rich and powerful so there is a widespread audience expectation that the actors portraying them would have light skin. This is changing, of course, but it remains very widespread.

  6. Zlick says

    I have only the most anecdotal evidence to confirm this – but the one Indian guy I know pretty well is from a powerful Indian family (and he had to give up a high government position when he was outted as a loathed gay). He’s just about the most racist person I know. He’s fairly dark skinned (actually I think his complexion color is quite beautiful), but is totally ga-ga about light skinned boys, and is so vile and hating toward anyone with darker skin than himself. Beautiful skin color or not, that makes him pretty ugly in my book.

  7. Steve Talbert says

    Good to know everything can be solved with a Conga Line.

    FYI – India is NOT racist, they are very class conscious. You are born into your caste and aspire to go up, although that can’t happen until the next life. So people trying to do it quicker (in this life) are looked down on as upstarts – or worse.

    Mexico in the 1600s and 1700s was much the same way.

  8. Gregory In Seattle says

    @Steve Talbert – Skin color and caste are very closely linked. It is no accident that the Brahmin and other high castes have lighter skin, while the Dalit (“Untouchables”) all have much darker skin.

    When class and skin color go hand in hand, being “class conscious” IS racist.

  9. UFFDA says

    “The caste system is racist and elitist”? Duh. The caste system is utterly, fundamentally, wholly, and virulently racist and elitist. It’s flagrantly founded on Brahminical/Hindu concepts of inherent inequality.

    The whole of Hindu-Indian culture must be fundamentally turned on its head to even begin the process of universal emancipation. As a “democracy” with 40 million “untouchables” India is both a ludicrously repulsive joke, but also a try.

    Many liberal Westerners do not seem to realize that there is simply no way around a real democracy in the full Western sense, not if people hope to have an inherent right to choose their own destiny, i.e. to vote for leaders and changes of ones choice.

  10. Gregory in Seattle says

    @Uffda – It is not just Hinduism: the caste system is so socially embedded that it exists even in Muslim, Buddhist, Christian, Jain and Sikh communities. Nor is it limited to just the country of India, as it exists in various forms in Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh as well.

  11. ian says

    well, this video doesn’t address the caste system, which i agree is racist and elitist, but it homophobia. It is a step in the right direction and even if it has just a tiny effect it is still a good thing. and while the actors are quite handsome, they are also very brave considering the rampant homophobia in indian culture and the reason for this video.

  12. Paul R says

    It’s certainly very Bollywood, with songs and dance expressing everything and a focus on celebrations and lifestyles that are a distant dream for most Indians.

    And here by lifestyles, I mean they’re filthy rich and can afford celebrations like this. It’s also pretty unlikely that the family wouldn’t have a pretty strong inkling that Sir’s “special friend” is a guy.

    The dressed up dog is cute, though, and I can’t fault the motivations.

  13. emjayay says

    Thanks guys for the explanations of the relationship of Hinduism, caste, and color. Obviously a lot more to it, but nice primer.

  14. Thomasina says

    Interesting that one of the repeated lines in this is “kabhi khushi kabhie gham,” which means “sometimes sadness, sometimes joy” but which is also the title of one of the biggest Bollywood blockbusters of the past 20 years. the plot of that movie concerned the struggle between respecting family and tradition versus marrying for love (in a heterosexual context, but still in a way that strains tradition). The advertising tagline for the movie was “It’s all about loving your parents.” It is pretty smart of them to call on and reinterpret something that would be a common cultural experience for their intended audience.

  15. Thomasina says

    Interesting that one of the repeated lines in this is “kabhi khushi kabhie gham,” which means “sometimes sadness, sometimes joy” but which is also the title of one of the biggest Bollywood blockbusters of the past 20 years. the plot of that movie concerned the struggle between respecting family and tradition versus marrying for love (in a heterosexual context, but still in a way that strains tradition). The advertising tagline for the movie was “It’s all about loving your parents.” It is pretty smart of them to call on and reinterpret something that would be a common cultural experience for their intended audience.

  16. Patrick says

    I love Indian weddings. Awesome 3 day blow outs. The music, the food, the dancing, the ceremonies, the vows, the tears,the joy & laughter,the fun.. And the handsome men.. Wow wow wowie…