Game of Thrones

George R.R. Martin Explains 'Game of Thrones' Lack of Gay Sex Scenes: VIDEO

George R.R. Martin, author of A Song of Ice And Fire, the series that inspired Game of Thrones, has opened up about why the popular television series has been somewhat more explicit in its depictions of gay and bisexual sex compared to the books.

5939185026_f6dbdfc215_zUnlike the television show, which jumps between scenes, settings, and perspectives in typical TV fashion, Martin writes each chapter of the series from the viewpoint of only one character, giving the chacters an interior voice that is more nuanced because of its limitations.

Cersei Lannister, played by Lena Headey, for example is commonly depicted in the HBO series as a scheming, shrewd lush foiled by the meddling men around her. The same can be said of her characterization in the books, but seeing the world of Westeros through her eyes and being able to read her thoughs out verbatim casts the queen regent in a different light.

“Frankly, it is the way I prefer to write fiction because that is the way all of us experience life,” The author elaborated during a panel at the Edinburgh International Book Festival. “A television show doesn’t have those limitations.”

Renly Baratheon (Gethin Anthony), younger brother to Stannis (Stephen Dillane), was portrayed as explicitly gay and somewhat openly in love with Loras Tyrell (Finn Jones), a member of his kingsguard in previous seasons of Game of Thrones despite their relationship being merely hinted at in the novels.

Martin went on to say that he’s very well aware of the--primarily female--demand for more gay sex scenes in his literature. iif and when the descriptions became integral to the development of the plot, he added, he would consider writing them.

Watch Game of Thrones's Gethin Anthony discuss the possibility of a Renly/Loras spinoff  AFTER THE JUMP...

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Comments

  1. I love the books and the show, but let's face it. Martin is of an older generation, where straight relations are the norm in literature. It's not surprising he would write that way. As long as he's not anti-gay, I don't care.

    Posted by: Jack M | Aug 13, 2014 11:19:53 AM


  2. The gay relationships were not hinted at in the books. It was quite clear that Renly and Loras were lovers.

    Posted by: crispy | Aug 13, 2014 11:28:39 AM


  3. "if and when the descriptions became integral to the development of the plot, he added, he would consider writing them."

    He sounds so passive here. He is the one in control. He can devise the plot which makes those characters and scenes integral.

    Posted by: Dastius Krazitauc | Aug 13, 2014 11:36:54 AM


  4. Major Homophobe....

    Posted by: rochon | Aug 13, 2014 11:46:53 AM


  5. Typical closet case writing for straights...

    Posted by: rochon | Aug 13, 2014 11:47:33 AM


  6. Speaking of homophobic closet cases, Rick is here posting under yet another alias, Rochon. He even links his name to the same balepic address he uses for other aliases.

    Rick, you wimp. You can't even troll worth a damn. What else are you good for? You're a waste of space and life.

    Posted by: Tyler | Aug 13, 2014 11:50:53 AM


  7. "He sounds so passive here."

    That's not a quote from Martin. That's the Towleroad writer's loose interpretation of what he said. You can always tell when Andy isn't the writer because there's so much unnecessary exposition.

    For the record, this is the actual quote:

    “I do get letters from fans that want me to present an explicit male sex scene. Most of these letters come from women. I don’t pretend to understand this, I merely read my emails. I’m not going to shy away from doing it if it has to happen, but I don’t think you can just insert things because everyone wants to see them.

    In the books I have a very limited third-person viewpoint. It’s the way I prefer to write fiction, because it’s the way we all see and experience life. I put gay characters in the books but they’re not the viewpoint characters. A TV show doesn’t have that limitation.”

    Posted by: crispy | Aug 13, 2014 11:51:26 AM


  8. Jeez, it's like people have not heard of "fan service". Martin has "lived" with these characters for nearly 25 years and they're not gonna do something out-of-character to appease the fans. That's what fan fiction is for.

    Posted by: Sam | Aug 13, 2014 12:06:39 PM


  9. Thanks, Crispy. I still think he is not assuming the responsibility and freedom he has as creator. "If it *has* to happen". That still sounds reluctant to me. I haven't read the books, so I have to ask, does every hetero sex scene in the book *have to happen* because they are integral to the plot?

    I do not know if all those women who are writing him pleading for a man-on-man sex scene have established characters in mind, but if they just want that scenario included somehow, he could write it with new characters.

    Posted by: Dastius Krazitauc | Aug 13, 2014 12:29:46 PM


  10. Game of Thrones is very heterocentric; however, he has inserted Renly and Loras and Oberyn Martell into the books and they went absolutely nowhere...leaving me with the POV of gay characters being plot points and nothing more--while the hetero characters become fully realized. George Martin has made clear his orientation, and THANK GOD he's not Orson (buggy) Card. Still a personal perspective can only go so far and at some point you have to do research and if he did that, he'd soon realize that straight and gay relationships are the same.

    Posted by: NICK CHARLES | Aug 13, 2014 12:32:59 PM


  11. "does every hetero sex scene in the book *have to happen* because they are integral to the plot?"

    For the most part, yes. The world he's created is VERY misogynistic, and most of the sex scenes that occur, including rape, establish that premise and advance the plot. Danaerys had sex in order to become impregnated, which led to the birth of her dragons. Additionally, sex is one of the few tools women have to survive in such a brutal setting, so it is employed frequently. Cersei has sex with her brother because he protects her.

    To be quite honest, two dudes doing it, while titillating, wouldn't advance the plot much. The overall story is about political alliances formed, primarily through marriages arranged by the patriarchs of each of the ruling families with the sole purpose of creating heirs to continue the family line. Without the ability to produce heirs, homosexual love serves little purpose in this culture.

    I don't think Martin is reluctant to depict gay sex. The real problem is that 5 books in, he has way too many characters and way too many POV characters that are already firmly established. To do a gay sex scene that doesn't feel cheap or random, he'd need to introduce new POV characters, and if he does that, this series is never going to end.

    Posted by: crispy | Aug 13, 2014 1:54:53 PM


  12. If someone wants more Gay GOT sex, then go write something in a fan fiction site. The author has written what he thought would advance the story he had in mind. There is nothing wrong with writing to 90% to 95% of your potential audience. That's like complaining that Tales of the City didn't have more suburban straight sex scenes.

    Posted by: Steve Talbert | Aug 13, 2014 2:17:31 PM


  13. This probably doesn't have anything to do with an "older generation", although I will say that the title of this post doesn't jibe at all with an "explanation". This is not an explanation at all.

    If Martin did want to explain it, the easiest explanation is probably the cause: if sexuality in the GOT universe is the same as on modern Earth, there is just a hell of a lot more straight people and straight sex. Now, neither HBO nor Martin have to keep it that way, but that's the simplest excuse.

    Posted by: Mike | Aug 13, 2014 3:25:02 PM


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