Matthew Dempsey Spells Out How To Keep Love Alive And When It’s Time To Say Goodbye: VIDEO

Dempsey

Psychologist Matthew Dempsey is back with the final two installments in his video-series on love and relationships. In his latest videos, Dempsey talks about how we can keep love alive in our relationships by opening up the lines of communication and working to make sure that each partner gets his or her needs met. Dempsey stresses that conflict is normal in a relationship and provides a chance to grow and heal.

Dempsey also underscores that breaking up should not necessarily be equated with failure. Given the way we live today and how our lives may lead us to unexpected places, it might not be possible (or beneficial) for one person to be able to accompany and be compatible with us along that entire journey. Dempsey says it best–sometimes you need to say, 

"I love you and thank you and goodbye. Sometimes saying goodbye can actually be the greatest act of love because we're allowing ourselves to get unstuck and the other person to get unstuck so each of us in our own right can welcome in greater fulfillment and love into our lives."

Preach.

Watch the final two episodes, AFTER THE JUMP…

You can also watch Dempsey's other videos on why we love who we do, finding loveshamecomparing and despairing, gays who are judgmental, and the need for validation.

Comments

  1. TheTris says

    Gay relationships and straight relationships are, pretty much, all the same at their root.

    If you really want to make your relationships work, and believe me, I know this sounds a bit mad, get the Tony Robbins love and relationship DVDs. Trust me. You’ll never regret it. And – in case you were wondering – yes, I’ve been happily with my partner for 10 and married this year.

  2. Paul Brownsey says

    “I love you and thank you and goodbye. Sometimes saying goodbye can actually be the greatest act of love because we’re allowing ourselves to get unstuck and the other person to get unstuck so each of us in our own right can welcome in greater fulfillment and love into our lives.”

    Yuck. All relationship breakdown is a failure. Still, there will always be people ready to make a buck by dressing up deceit, shallowness, betrayal, selfishness, etc, in terms that present them as as brave steps to “greater fulfillment and love”.

  3. payedpiper says

    Sometimes saying goodbye can actually be the greatest act of love because we’re allowing ourselves to get unstuck and the other person to get unstuck so each of us in our own right can welcome in greater fulfillment and love into our lives.

    – I think his pretty face got that from a facebook meme? What if the other person was/is fulfilled … & you’re just shallow?

  4. BrokebackBob says

    I could not possibly have a beautiful man (inside and out) as a psychotherapist. Would just make me feel completely inferior and old.
    My therapist was an older very very wise woman who was first a doctor, then a child pediatric specialist, then a psychiatrist, then a specialty in child psychiatry. She is amazing and saved my life. We still friends after 20 years plus.

  5. BrokebackBob says

    This guy is probably a good therapist but I refuse to believe that physically beautiful people ever really get past their beauty while they have it. They may also be smart and be lovely inside too, as this man probably is, but I bet he gets some gay clients who can’t work with him because of resenting his beauty and youth. Most gay men under age 40 who are still lovely inside and out don’t want to have anything to do with man over 50 unless they are rich and want to play sugar daddy.

  6. QJ201 says

    Mr Dempsey has a masters degree and a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor (LPCC).

    His is NOT a PSYCHOLOGIST. That profession requires a PhD according to the American Psychological Association, which is why Mr. (not Dr.) Dempsey calls himself a Psycho-therapist.

    Regardless we’re only paying attention because he’s pretty and wear tight clothes to show off his bod

  7. Sean says

    He speaks like a teenage girl – not a good quality for a relationship counsellor. Anyone ever notice how narcissists are attracted to the field of counselling?

  8. excy says

    It amazes me that some people believe that we are destined to love one person for the rest of our lives. I have seen a lot of co-dependency and fear of the unknown in my life. Following the old adage of “better the devil you know” just keeps people in dysfunctional relationships. Ending a relationship does not mean you want to immediately start another…it simply means you want to breathe.

  9. Randy says

    “breaking up should not necessarily be equated with failure”

    That depends entirely on the nature of the relationship.

    If you have a friends-with-benefits relationship, then sure.

    But if you have made someone your family, that is a life-long relationship. If it ends, that is absolutely a failure on the part of one partner, or both. Let’s not shy away from that just because it makes people uncomfortable.

    People are not shoes. There are things you do not do to people.

    Based on the divorce rate, my conclusion is that many people should not even be getting married in the first place, because they don’t have the integrity or empathy to live with another person. It’s too bad that innocent people have to discover this too late. Given the economic impact alone, I suspect it is in our interest to fund objective scientific solutions for detecting and preventing bad marriages before they happen. Someone’s probably already working on it.

  10. pablo says

    Trite BS. I wish everyone would stop pretending this is anything more than Twilight for gay men. It’s just a hot guy spouting cliches. Let’s all calm down here.

Leave A Reply