David Miranda Hub




Glenn Greenwald Enters Country for First Time Since NSA Leaks

Journalists Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras entered the United States for the first time since reporting on NSA documents leaked by Edward Snowden, according to a tweet from AP reporter Ted Shaffrey. Accompanying Greenwald was his partner David Miranda.

GreenwaldGreenwald and Poitras are in the country to attend Friday’s Polk Awards ceremony in New York City according to the HuffPost:

The two journalists are sharing the prestigious journalism award with The Guardian’s Ewen MacAskill and with Barton Gellman, who has led The Washington Post’s reporting on the NSA documents. Greenwald and Poitras interviewed Snowden last June in Hong Kong as he first revealed himself.

In an interview with The Huffington Post, Greenwald said he’s motivated to return because “certain factions in the U.S. government have deliberately intensified the threatening climate for journalists.”

“It’s just the principle that I shouldn’t allow those tactics to stop me from returning to my own country,” Greenwald said.

Greenwald suggested government officials and members of Congress have used the language of criminalization as a tactic to chill investigative journalism.

Greenwald told the HuffPost his legal counsel has not been informed "whether or not he could face any potential charges, or if he's been named in any grand jury investigation tied to the NSA disclosures."


Glenn Greenwald's Partner David Miranda Opens Up About His Detention, and the Couple's Life in Brazil

Miranda

Buzzfeed profiles Glenn Greenwald's partner David Miranda, who was detained in August at Heathrow airport while transporting documents related to the NSA revelations published by Greenwald in the Guardian earlier this year.

Miranda offers a revealing account of his detention:

A rotating tag team of seven agents asked Miranda questions ranging from his personal life with Greenwald to his family background to his own politics. Miranda’s request for a translator was brushed aside, and all nine hours were spent being interrogated in English.

“First they tried to pit me against Glenn,” Miranda recalls. The agents asked Miranda whom he went to the nightclubs with in Berlin. “Boyfriends,” Miranda replied, meaning male friends. Did Glenn know about these boyfriends? “No.” How would Glenn feel if he knew Miranda was out with the other men? “Fine.” They asked if Miranda had been in contact with Edward Snowden. “No.” Were his family members political? “No.” They asked about Miranda’s political views. Did he support the street protests in Brazil? “Yes.” Did he participate in the protests? “No.”

“They offered me water, but they didn’t pour it front of me,” Miranda says with a note of pride. “So I said no. I didn’t trust them for a second, I never had a drink of water while I was there, and I never got up to go the bathroom.”
Back in Brazil, Greenwald was asleep at home. “I get a phone call at 6:30 in the morning, which you know is bad news,” Greenwald says. A man who gave no name identified himself as a “security official at Heathrow Airport” and said Miranda was in detention under the Terrorism Act. He told Greenwald that Miranda had been held at that point for three hours and that they could hold him up to nine hours, at which point they could arrest him, release him, or ask a judge for additional time to interrogate.

His life with Greenwald:

If you ask Miranda about the dynamics between him and Greenwald (and the 10 stray dogs the couple have adopted), Miranda describes himself as the alpha. “I’m the pack leader,” Miranda tells me, grinning. “A son of Apollo.” Miranda tends to dominate through his moods; he’s quick to show his disdain, annoyance, or disappointment. “I’m a very emotional person,” Miranda says, putting both tan hands to his Armani-clad chest. “Like, you will always know how I’m feeling and when I’m feeling it.” Greenwald, a former champion high school debater, city council candidate, and courtroom litigator, tries to counter Miranda’s occasional brooding or temper with point-by-point arguments to the contrary.

“We yell when we fight,” Miranda admits, “but we never break up. There’s something in the universe that says we have to be together. I never met anyone like Glenn — he’s my husband and I don’t know where either of us would be without each other.”

And his determination to support Greenwald in his ongoing journalistic endeavors:

“Ultimately, as harrowing and unjust as it was, the U.K. actually did us a favor,” Greenwald says as we head toward the car. “They revealed how abusive the U.S. and U.K. can be with power, which is a major point of the reporting I’m doing; they humanized the story, and they gave a platform for my charming and admirable husband to speak out.”


Glenn Greenwald and David Miranda Talk to Anderson Cooper About Miranda's Detention: VIDEO

Miranda_greenwald

Guardian journalist Glenn Greenwald and his partner David Miranda spoke to Anderson Cooper last night about Miranda's detention by UK officials for nine hours at Heathrow Airport over the weekend as he returned home from Rio de Janeiro from Berlin.

Watch, AFTER THE JUMP....

Miranda, who had been visiting Laura Poitras, the documentary filmmaker who broke the Edward Snowden story with Greenwald in The Guardian, had his electronics confiscated.

Greenwald_mirandaMiranda, who was held under the Terrorism Act, tells Cooper that he was not asked any questions about terrorism but feared the broad powers the U.S. and its allies now have to hold potential suspects indefinitely. Greenwald said it was "terrorizing" to get a call from a British official saying “the person you love most in the world and with whom you share your life” was being detained.

Added Greenwald:

“Every single newsroom in the United State, every single major news organization in the world, has classified information...Reporting on what governments do in the secret is what journalism is about. So if you support the idea that states can just go and confiscate from journalists classified information, you should be demanding the government can go into newsrooms and seize whatever classified information is there...Journalism is not a crime and it’s not terrorism.”

In a post-interview debate, CNN commentator and attorney Jeffrey Toobin compared Miranda to a "drug mule", an assertion Jesselyn Radack from the Government Accountability Project shot down:

“David was serving as an in-between, not as a drug mule. I have to wonder why the U.S. government and our allies are so desperate to keep our illegalities secret and our lawbreaking secret, that they are willing to use a terrorism law to stop a journalist.”

Watch, AFTER THE JUMP....

Toobin

Continue reading "Glenn Greenwald and David Miranda Talk to Anderson Cooper About Miranda's Detention: VIDEO" »


Trending



Towleroad - Blogged