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Tom Daley Tops Attitude Magazine's Hot 100 List, Poses For Cover

Daley

The new issue of Attitude magazine finds Tom Daley slightly more clothed than usual, opting for jeans rather than a speedo. Still, the superstar diver is burning up the cover. His dashing good looks were not the focus of his interview, though it does happen to coincide with the release of Attitude's Hot 100 List, upon which Daley is sitting pretty at number one.

Attitude reports:

“I just wanted to say a massive thank you to everyone who voted for me in Attitude’s HOT 100 – it means the world,” said Tom following the announcement at Attitude’s exclusive HOT 100 party in central London.

Though one could admire Daley for his impressive diving technique, or his six-pack, he is also a role model for young LGBT people around the globe.

In his first ever gay press interview, the 20-year-old Olympic diver talks about how he balances his rigorous training schedule with his relationship with American screenwriter Dustin Lance Black – and also discusses coming out in a YouTube video last December.

“If the video helped anyone going through something similar, then that’s great,” Daley says. “I filmed that video because I wanted to tell people in my own words.”

After saying that “everyone should have the right to marry the person they love”, the London 2012 bronze medallist reveals that he sees himself getting married one day. “Family is something that has always been really important to me and yes, at some point I would love to marry and have kids,” he says.

Congrats Tom!


Line-Up For NewFest, New York's Biggest LGBT Film Festival, Announced: VIDEO

NewFestIn late June, Outfest, in partnership with the Film Society of Lincoln Center, announced the lineup for New York City's largest and most esteemed LGBT film festival, NewFest! Running from July 24th through July 29th, the nearly week-long event will consist of sixteen narrative and five documentary features.

Write the organizers:

Lesli Klainberg, Film Society of Lincoln Center's Executive Director said, “This marks the fourth year of having NewFest at the Film Society and we couldn’t be happier to continue our collaboration with Outfest. LGBT films and filmmakers are a vital part of cinema worldwide, and we are thrilled to offer this showcase on our screens each year.”

“In the year following spectacular LGBT civil rights advances across the country, the dynamic and fresh slate of 2014 NewFest films decisively demonstrates that artists and storytellers lead the charge in creating social change,” said Kristin Pepe (KP), Outfest’s Director of Programming.

NewFest's goal is to support "diverse film communities and voices from around the world," and the lineup for this year's festival has international entries from Brazil, Canada, Switzerland, The Netherlands, Israel, and several other countries, as well as films focused on the experiences of lesbian, gay, and transgender characters. 

FuturoThe opening night film, Futuro Beach, is a joint Brazilian and German production:

"When Brazilian lifeguard Donato fails to save a swimmer from drowning, he seeks out the victim’s friend Konrad, a handsome German biker. The two men begin a passionate affair, and Donato soon decides to follow Konrad to Berlin. Years later, their seemingly peaceful life is threatened by a visitor from Donato’s past. Director Karim Aïnouz...delivers a visually stunning, emotionally resonant tale about three men struggling across oceans of love, loss, and heartache."

GerontophiliaAnd the closing night slot is filled by legendary filmmaker Bruce LaBruce's Gerontophilia:

"Lake refuses to feel shame about his unquenchable appetite for older men. The handsome teen defiantly signs up as an orderly at a local nursing home and quickly falls for Mr. Peabody, a charming, flirtatious soul with one last wish. Forget everything you know about filmmaker Bruce LaBruce: in what is easily his most romantic work to date, he dares us to look beyond fetish to embrace the beauty of all stages of life."

NewFest tickets will go on sale on July 10th. For more information, visit the NewFest website.

And check out the trailers for Futuro Beach (not in English) and Gerontophilia, AFTER THE JUMP...

Continue reading "Line-Up For NewFest, New York's Biggest LGBT Film Festival, Announced: VIDEO" »


Short Film '420' Celebrates The HomoStoner Lifestyle: VIDEO

Homostoners

Jacob Brown's new short film "420" is straightforward, sexy, and psychedelic. A prolonged, lip-lock-filled toking session, the movie aims to promote respect and acknowledgement of a hybrid cultural niche: that of the 'homostoner'. One part homosexual, one part stoner, both parts woozy fun, the film is a fantasia acted out by a real-life couple.

Brown's Vimeo descriptions reads:

In the past few years, mainstream America has warmed to two formerly taboo trends: gay rights and marijuana. New York boyfriends Carlos Santolalla and John Tuite sit at the intersection of the two––their shared Instagram handle @jarlos420 is a showcase of their homostoner lifestyle. This video celebrates 420 and homoeroticism. “It’s about how weed can act as an aphrodisiac,” Santolalla explains. “A fantasy about when ‘lemme hit that’ becomes ‘lemme hit that.’”

Enjoy the short film, AFTER THE JUMP...

(Warning: work-unfriendly)

Continue reading "Short Film '420' Celebrates The HomoStoner Lifestyle: VIDEO" »


Mash-Up Of Homophobic Jokes From Michael Bay Films Reveals Director's Gay Panic: VIDEO

MichaelBay1

Bad BoysTransformers, The Island, and Pain and Gain: these are examples of hyper-kinetic, variably watchable, mildly entertaining cinema, and the oeuvre of Michael Bay, whose new film, Transformers: Age of Extinction hit theaters this weekend. They also revel in homophobic humor which, taken out of context, adds up to one frustrating, panicked directorial vision. 

It may be nit-picky to point out each and every instance of humor rooted in intimations of gay sex, male-male romance, or hyper-effeminate mannerisms. But it is also reveals the pervasive, easy-to-bypass nature of homophobia in our masculine, heterosexually-driven society.

Watch and grimace, over at Gawker...


Boulder, CO County Clerk Issues Marriage Licenses To 34 Gay Couples Including State Senator: VIDEO

COMarriage

Following the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals ruling on Wednesday, which upheld the unconstitutionality of Utah's same-sex marriage ban, the county clerk of Boulder, CO, Hillary Hall, began issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples there. As of now, 34 couples have been recipients of the licenses, including Colorado state Senator Jessie Ulibarri (D-Commerce City). The state attorney general, John Suthers, has stated that their marriages are invalid as Colorado still maintains its same-sex marriage ban.

NBC 9 News reports:

While [the AG] contemplates court action, he also wants to speed the gay marriage issue to the Supreme Court:

"Until the Supreme Court decides, we do not have same-sex marriage in Colorado. We're looking at a variety of options, and that's all I'm going to say about it," Suthers said.

County clerk Hillary Hall said she'll issue licenses unless a court tells her otherwise.

Boulder County, CO reportedly had a leg up on the same-sex marriage issue, granting licenses to four couples in 1975 before the AG put a stop to it.

Watch ABC 7's news coverage about the marriage licenses, AFTER THE JUMP...

Continue reading "Boulder, CO County Clerk Issues Marriage Licenses To 34 Gay Couples Including State Senator: VIDEO" »


Film Review: 'Broken Heart Land' Weaves Unexpected And Tragic Tapestry Of Grief

BHL4

Broken Heart Land, an expectation-eschewing documentary from directors Jeremy and Randy Stulberg, begins with an all-too-familiar tragedy in the rural American landscape: the suicide of a gay teenager. From there it weaves a far different story than one might anticipate, opting for a complex exploration of a family struck by death and a town in the throws of an identity crisis. 

The setting, Norman, Oklahoma--home to the University of Oklahoma--is seen by many citizens as a bastion of liberal goodwill in one of the nation’s most conservative geographic regions. In reality, though, the town is largely inhabited by Christian conservatives and other folks who fall uneasily within a murky spectrum of political thought. 

BHL2Two such people, Van and Nancy Harrington, are the parents of Zack, a reserved guy who came out in high school, seemingly without significant fanfare and with ardent support from his family. We learn very little about Zack, save for his participation in the high school color guard; his sudden suicide leaves him even more of an enigma. Only when his grieving parents receive the coroners report do they, and the audience, find out that Zack was HIV-positive and had been treating himself with drugs bought on the street. It is a surprising turn of events within the film. One friend, overcome with emotion and unsure whether or not to speak on the matter, recounts the way that Zack finally told her, after over a year of hinting, about his status. The wound of his death is clearly still fresh for everyone involved, and this particular revelation throws them for a loop. The trailer, which we reported on previously, framed Zack’s HIV-status as the central mystery within the narrative, but its reveal comes early, both in the run time and in the mourning process. The film actually seems far more concerned with picking up the pieces and understanding just how great an impact Zack’s death had, particularly on his mother and rather surprisingly on small town politics.

BHL1Just before Zack’s death, he may or may not have attended the Norman town council meeting where an LGBT History Month proposal was discussed and voted on. The mystery of his attendance reflects the unknowable qualities of his personality, but it is no matter in comparison with the bigoted and disturbing diatribe unleashed by many of the town’s most influential conservatives, including Chad Williams, an assistant pastor of a local mega-church and an eventual candidate for town council. 

The dueling campaigns of Williams and an openly lesbian opponent form the backbone of much of the documentary, framed by the broken and embittered family at the center of the tragedy. Both Van and Nancy Harrington are self-proclaimed Republicans and supporters of the LGBT rights movement, an almost oxymoronic combination these days, and their understanding of politics is shaken throughout the film by national trends (see: the Tea Party) and the closer-to-home town council race. Nancy joins a Norman group called Moms Of Many (MOM), formed in the wake of Zack’s death. She learns about the representation of the LGBT community in politics, campaigns for Williams’ competitor, and, in a particularly tense scene, confronts the pastor after all of her LGBT-related questions are ignored at a debate amongst the candidates. Van is largely seen sitting on a couch at home, watching Fox News, and smoking a cigarette; the grief is palpable and nearly unbearable. 

Still, both he and Nancy traverse an arc, from disbelief and upset about Zack’s status (his keeping it from them more so than the fact that he was positive) to a state of sad but empowered motivation to create change. We eventually see them dedicate a bench in Norman to their son and march in an AIDS Walk in his memory. 

BHL3Ultimately the “broken heart land” of the film’s title seems twofold. It is a comment on the nature of grief and tragedy, rendered so vividly in the lives of the Harringtons, and it is an observation about the shifting, highly oppositional politics of a nation, and particularly the midwest. The Harringtons are a family awakened to their own faults, their political aspirations, and their beliefs. The same, unfortunately, cannot necessarily be said for Williams and others in the more conservative contingent. They stand behind a “we love everyone enough to tell them that they are wrong” facade, never owning up to what the filmmakers and the Harringtons come to believe: something, many things, must be wrong in a society where someone, Zack, would take his own life. LGBT inequality, non-comprehensive sex education, and perhaps even organized religion come under fire. While there is no conclusive reason behind Zack's suicide, beautifully-read passages of his tormented poetry and journals accompany nostalgic video footage throughout the film, giving prophetic voice to a young man no longer able to speak his mind.

Broken Heart Land is a powerful, unexpectedly political, and deeply sad documentary. At its center lies a teenager who could have lived a long, fulfilling life, given the support he deserved all along.

You can stream Broken Heart Land online at worldchannel.org, or catch it airing The World Channel through this weekend.


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