Jan Brewer Hub




Arizona Governor Jan Brewer Says She Would Consider Bill Protecting Gays from Discrimination

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Governor Jan Brewer, who four months ago was at the center of a contentious debate in her state surrounding a bill (SB1062) that would have allowed religion-based discrimination against gays (she vetoed it), told Capitol Media Services on Tuesday that she would consider expanding the state's civil rights laws to cover gay people if a bill were presented to her:

On Tuesday, Brewer said the question of whether Arizona should expand its anti-discrimination laws comes down to looking at the issue from the opposite perspective of SB1062: Is there a real problem with discrimination that drives a need for such a change?

“That’s something we don’t see a lot of anymore, because of people’s changing patterns of discrimination,” she said.

The governor suggested that state lawmakers might want to hold hearings on the issue.

“If it needs to be addressed, it needs to be debated in the Legislature,” Brewer said.

“Testimony needs to be presented,” she continued. “Let the representatives of the people who have been elected by the populace of the state of Arizona determine and get it up to the governor.”

And what would she do with it?

“I don’t know what would be in that bill or how they would write it,” Brewer said. “But I certainly would evaluate it and do what I thought was the right thing to do for the state.”


The Real Reason Arizona's Anti-Gay Discrimination Bill Was So Bad

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BY ARI EZRA WALDMAN

When Arizona Governor Jan Brewer vetoed an odious discrimination bill that would have allowed private individuals and companies to deny service to and otherwise discriminate against gay persons, most people breathed a collective sigh of relief. Many Republicans were happy to erase this stain from their brand, though conservatives in several states have other plans. Most Americans were just happy Jim Crow was not coming back.

Not everyone was so pleased. The right wing was, of course, up in arms. But few of us spend much time worrying about what Michelle Bachmann or Rush Limbaugh think. Then there was George Will, a conservative commentator without the Hellfire that rises from much of today's extreme right. Mr. Will coats his comments with his particular brand of amiability and an aw-shucks attitude in a bow tie. But his words were the most malicious.

WillHere's what he said in reaction to the veto:

It's a funny kind of sore winner in the gay rights movement that would say, 'A photographer doesn't want to photograph my wedding -- I've got lots of other photographers I could go to, but I'm going to use the hammer of government to force them to do this.'... It's not neighborly and it's not nice. The gay rights movement is winning. They should be, as I say, not sore winners.

He characterizes us as winners, which is both a half-truth and red meat for his conservative audience. We have not won anything. Sure, we are racking up notable victories, but you can still be fired in 29 states simply for being gay and I cannot marry the man I love in 33 states. Yet arguing that the fight is already over heightens the feverish paranoia of his readers and listeners; that is, he is warning conservatives that the gays already took marriage away from you and now they're coming for something more.

He also characterizes gays as childish, as ungrateful "sore winners" who do not know how to be neighborly, mature, and adult about things. This may sound peevish and petty, but it also fits within a long standing conservative narrative about gay people as unserious, untrustworthy, small, and entirely hedonistic, just like children.

Mr. Will's greatest sin, however, is in his offensive misconstrual of the substantitive fight. To him, we have a choice between this or that photographer -- "I've got lots of other photographers I could go to" -- suggesting that mere choice is the paradigm for equality. This is the grave error libertarians commit, as well. Equality is barely half a loaf if its pinnacle is the ability to choose. True equality is also about equal dignity, about not being treated like a second-class citizens simply because of who you are. Avoiding state sanctioned discrimination because you may have another choice does not change the underlying fact of discrimination.

CONTINUED, AFTER THE JUMP...

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Arizona Governor Jan Brewer Makes Big Announcement: VIDEO

Brewer

Arizona Governor Jan Brewer will not run for reelection, the announced on Wednesday, CNN reports:

Her announcement comes amid questions about whether she could legally seek another four years in office.

As Arizona secretary of state in 2009, Brewer automatically succeeded Janet Napolitano as governor when the Democrat became President Barack Obama's homeland security secretary. Arizona is one of a few states without a lieutenant governor.

Brewer sought and won a full term in 2010 and hadn't ruled out trying again.

But Arizona law dictates that a governor can't run for more than two consecutive terms, and a partial term is counted as a full term. In other words, Brewer's time in office before she was elected in 2010 would count as a full four-year term.

Watch her make the announcement, AFTER THE JUMP...

Brewer vowed to work until the last minute: "Both my pen and my veto stamp have plenty of ink."

Continue reading "Arizona Governor Jan Brewer Makes Big Announcement: VIDEO" »


In Vetoing Arizona's SB 1062, Jan Brewer Rejected a Bill That Her Own Staff Helped Write

Arizona Governor Jan Brewer's staff helped write the anti-gay 'religious freedom' bill SB 1062, the AP reports:

Press_brewerArizona Gov. Jan Brewer's staff worked with proponents of a bill that would have allowed businesses to refuse service to gays before the legislation was introduced in January, according to emails released by her office. The meetings between Brewer's legal counsel and policy director came as the Center for Arizona Policy tried to make changes to a bill that was vetoed last year to make it more palatable to the governor.

Of course, following outrage from corporate America and the public, Brewer vetoed this bill as well.

The AP adds:

Center for Arizona Policy president Cathi Herrod blamed the bill's fate on opponents who misrepresented what it does. "I believe the veto was politics at its worst,' Herrod said Monday, "The veto was of a bill that did not exist and the 1062 opponents were able to make the bill about something it was not."

She acknowledged she worked with Brewer's staff on the bill. "The governor's officer raised several questions about the language, we had thorough discussions about the language and changes were made to the language based on those discussions," she said...

Herrod's group wields great power among Republicans who control the Arizona Legislature. The social conservative group backs conservative Christian legislation and is opposed to gay marriage and abortion.

Wonderful, efficient use of taxpayer money.


Michele Bachmann Unhappy Jan Brewer Vetoed Arizona's Anti-Gay Bill

Bachmann

In an interview with Yahoo's The Fine Print, Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-MN) expressed disappointment that Jan Brewer vetoed SB 1062, the anti-gay 'religious freedom' bill.

Said Bachmann:  “I believe that tolerance is a two-way street, and we need to respect everyone's rights, including the rights of people who have sincerely held religious beliefs,...Religious liberties and the protection of our religious liberties is right...Right now, there's a terrible intolerance afoot in the United States, and it's against people who hold sincerely held religious beliefs.”

Watch the interview here.


Steve King: Gays Don't Deserve Equal Rights Because Homosexuality Can't Be 'Independently Verified': VIDEO

King

Congressman Steve King (R-IA) told Des Moines' WHO TV that he disagrees with Jan Brewer's veto of Arizona's SB 1062, the bill that would have allowed businesses to discriminate against gays based on religious beliefs, Right Wing Watch reports.

Said King:

"When you’re in the private sector and you’re an individual entrepreneur with God-given rights that our founding fathers defined in the Declaration, you should be able to make our own decisions on what you do in that private business."

King went on to argue that homosexuality is "self-professed behavior"

"That’s what they’re trying to protect is special rights for self-professed behavior."

King added:

“If it’s not specifically protected in the Constitution, then it’s got to be an immutable characteristic, that being a characteristic that can be independently verified and cannot be willfully changed.”

Watch, AFTER THE JUMP...

Continue reading "Steve King: Gays Don't Deserve Equal Rights Because Homosexuality Can't Be 'Independently Verified': VIDEO" »


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