Joe Lieberman Hub




Senators Not Keen On Hagel For Defense Secretary: VIDEO

LiebermanHagel

Former Republican Sen. Chuck Hagel cleaned up one political headache, kind of, by apologizing for comments he made in 1998 about Ambassador James Hormel being "aggressively gay."

Hormel has accepted the apology, though does point out it most likely came to clear a path for President Obama to nominate Hagel to be the next Defense Secretary. "While the timing appears self-serving, the words themselves are unequivocal--they are a clear apology," Hormel wrote. 

But there's still the pesky problem of Republicans who oppose Hagel for opposing the surge in Iraq, his votes and comments about Israel and his resistance to sanctions on Iran. If Sen. Lindsey Graham's remarks this morning are any indication, that GOP problem isn't going away anytime soon.

"The Republicans are going to ask him hard questions, and I don’t think he’s going to get many Republican votes," Graham said on Meet the Press. "His positions -- I didn’t really, quite frankly, know all of them -- are really out of the mainstream and well to the left of the president. I think it would be a challenging nomination." Asked if he would support Hagel, Graham said he's going to wait until the nomination hearings. Democratic Sen. Chuck Schumer was also asked, but said he's standing by until an actual nomination has been put forth.

Meanwhile, independent Sen. Joe Lieberman used similar language on CNN's State of the Union, telling host Candy Crowley, "...If I were in the Senate on the Armed Services Committee and he was nominated, I would have some really serious questions to ask him, not just about Israel, but to me, the most significant foreign policy challenge for President Obama and our country and the world in the next year or two is Iran and it's nuclear weapons program. Chuck Hagel has had some very outlying votes on that."

Watch Graham, Schumer and Lieberman discuss Hagel's odds AFTER THE JUMP.

Continue reading "Senators Not Keen On Hagel For Defense Secretary: VIDEO" »


Lindsey Graham, Joe Lieberman, and John McCain Sound Off on Same-Sex Marriage: VIDEO

Piers

Senators John McCain, Joe Lieberman, and Lindsey Graham appeared were interviewed by Piers Morgan last night about the right of gay people to marry.

After comparing same-sex marriage to polygamy, Graham compared the marriage equality debate to the civil war:

Can — can I suggest this? Slavery was outlawed by a Constitutional amendment. Go watch “Lincoln,” a great movie. The people decided. The question for us is who should decide these things? Should it be a handful of judges or should it be the people themselves? And I come out on the side of the people themselves. Different people will look at it differently. But slavery was outlawed by a Constitutional amendment. If you want to propose a Constitutional amendment legalizing same-sex marriage and it passes, that’s the law of the land.

Watch, AFTER THE JUMP...

Continue reading "Lindsey Graham, Joe Lieberman, and John McCain Sound Off on Same-Sex Marriage: VIDEO" »


Senator Joseph Lieberman (I-CT) to Retire

LiebermanSenator Joseph Lieberman (I-CT) will announce tomorrow he won't seek another term in 2012, the WaPo's Chris Cilliza reports:

"Lieberman's office did not offer any comment on his plans, saying only that he would make an announcement tomorrow in Stamford, Connecticut. 'The Senator's remarks tomorrow will stand on their own,' said a Lieberman spokeswoman...With Lieberman out, the focus will turn to a very tightly contested Democratic primary between Secretary of State Susan Bysiewicz and Rep. Chris Murphy. Bysiewicz announced her candidacy Tuesday while Murphy was expected to formally enter the race within days. Rep. Joe Courtney has also said he is considering a candidacy."


Last Night, Mitch McConnell Tried a Last-Ditch Amendment to Defense Bill to Block 'DADT' Repeal

He was blocked by Joe Lieberman, Politico reports:

Mcconnell A last-ditch effort by Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) to complicate the repeal of the "don't ask, don't tell" policy was blocked Tuesday night after Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) objected, Senate aides said.

McConnell attempted to add an amendment to the so-called stripped-down defense authorization bill that would have required the consent of the military service chiefs to proceed with "don't ask" repeal. Under legislation passed by the Senate last week, certifications are required from the president, the secretary of defense and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. All the incumbents in those positions support repeal.

"It was a McConnell proposal," a GOP aide confirmed. "There was an attempted to get unanimous consent for it to be included in the defense bill and someone objected."

McConnell's amendment, which Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and other GOP senators have been urging for months, called for certifications from the four service chiefs. All of the incumbents in those positions have expressed at least some reservations about repeal at this time.

Repeal advocates have long viewed such an amendment as a poison pill. Presumably, this is what prompted Lieberman's objection.

The Caucus has more on the stinky last-ditch move.

The 'DADT' repeal act signing is scheduled to take place at 9:15 am at the Department of Interior. Please join us LIVE a few minutes before that time.

 


DADT Rundown - The Day After The Senate Repeal

 road DADT repeal will create a ripple effect in fight for gay rights: "Yet the repeal is far more than just a single policy shift. The overturning of "don't ask, don't tell" is likely to create a ripple effect in addressing other gay-rights issues, as many states continue to debate issues including same-sex marriage and the right of gay partners to share benefits the same way legally married couples do. With gay service members serving openly, it will become difficult for policy makers to justify, say, withholding visitation rights or survivor benefits to the same-sex spouse of a wounded or fallen soldier."

Dadt  road Secretary of Defense Robert Gates has urged gays and lesbians servicemen to remain closeted - for now: "The new rules would still not take effect for another 60 days. The military will implement change in a responsible, deliberate manner,' said Mullen, the highest ranking military officer. Gates warned troops they should keep their sexual orientation quiet for now because the current law and policy will remain in effect during the deliberative process. The Pentagon has nonetheless implemented a de facto moratorium on ousting troops over their sexual orientation since a first ruling against "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" by a federal judge in October."

 road It could take longer than 60 days. Some are reporting that the implementation of the repeal could take up to a year for it to go into full effect.

 road Nancy Pelosi tells the Advocate: “I think people will see this [vote] as a celebration of our country. Passing this bill makes America stronger in every way, not just national security, but in our values. Frankly it’s a boost of morale for the nation and will be remembered as a defining time when we said no to discrimination.”

 road Andrew Cohen of The Atlantic writes about the next legal fight for gays in the military: "Now that the Pentagon will finally be recognizing the existence of such service members in its ranks, it will also as a matter of law and logic be recognizing the existence of same-sex partners or same-sex spouses. But those folks are barred by the federal Defense of Marriage Act from receiving some of the benefits that opposite-sex partners or opposite-sex spouses would receive from the military."

 road The Freedom Federation would like to see a repeal of yesterday's repeal: "This action will be overturned in the next Congress because it breaks the bond of trust that must exist between the military and those who command in the Pentagon and Congress."

Joe road Joe Lieberman says that yesterday's vote to repeal DADT has nothing to do with his decision to potentially run for a fifth term in 2012.

 road Nate Silver on why some Republicans may have voted for the repeal: "All of this is just Politics 101: when a policy initiative enjoys the support of 60 or 70 or 80 percent of the public, it is liable to garner some bipartisan support."

 road The end of DADT means the return of ROTC to some college campuses: "The repeal of the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" law barring gays and lesbians from serving openly in the armed forces won't be implemented for a few months yet, but it will immediately lead elite colleges to begin to reconcile with the military training program kicked off college campuses more than four decades ago. Harvard University President Drew Gilpin Faust promised in a November joint appearance with Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Adm. Mike Mullen at the school's Institute of Politics that the Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) programs would return to Harvard once the Don't Ask law was repealed."


Senate Bill 4022 to Repeal 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' Introduced

4022

Senator Joseph Lieberman has introduced an referred a stand-alone bill to repeal "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" and referred it to the Armed Services Committee, records show.

Here's an ACTION ALERT from the Courage Campaign with information on Senators you should call now.

If you're in Washington, D.C. head over to the rally in front of the Senate at noon today.

Also, if you're in Chicago, there is a DADT rally happening at noon at Federal Plaza.

And if you're in Miami, there is a rally happening at Miami Beach City Hall at 3 pm.


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