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Kyrgyzstan Urged To Drop New Anti-Gay 'Propaganda' Law: VIDEO

  Kyrgyzstan gay rights

In a resolution adopted yesterday, the European Parliament (EP) has called on Kyrgyzstan to reject new legislation banning “gay propaganda.”

The legislation - which closely resembles anti-gay laws in Russia - was introduced in March of last year and overwhelmingly passed a first reading in October.

According to the EP’s Intergroup on LGBT Rights, the draft law would ban the dissemination of information “aimed at forming positive attitudes toward non-traditional sexual relations,” with those found guilty facing up to one year in prison.

6a00d8341c730253ef01b7c6f55abf970b-250wiAlthough the EP acknowledged democratic progress in Kyrgyzstan, it has called on the country’s parliament to reject the bill and has urged politicians from engaging in anti-gay hate speech.

Additionally, the EP has supported recommendations that the country should combat all forms of discrimination and violence based on sexual orientation and gender identity.

The Co-President of the LGBTI Intergroup and co-author of the resolution, Ulrike Lunacek MEP said:

“If this bill is passed, anyone who speaks positively about LGBTI issues can be imprisoned. This is an attack on the freedom of expression, the freedom of assembly and the right to non-discrimination for the Kyrgyz people, in particular LGBTI people.

“If the Kyrgyz parliament is serious about its constitution which protects human and civil rights, it should reject this bill.”

The legislation now requires an additional two readings and presidential approval before becoming law.

Watch a report on LGBTI rights in Kyrgyzstan, AFTER THE JUMP...

Continue reading "Kyrgyzstan Urged To Drop New Anti-Gay 'Propaganda' Law: VIDEO" »


Kyrgyzstan MP Calls For Public Extermination Of All Homosexuals: VIDEO

Narynbek Maldobaev

Kyrgyzstan, a small central Asian nation just east of Uzbekistan and north of Afghanistan, is a relatively newly independent nation, just 25 years out of being a part of the Soviet republic. With this new independence, there are two primary forces fighting for control, neither of which is desirable, and both of which are extremely anti-gay: Russian President Vladimir Putin and radical Islam.

A 26-minute film by Vocativ covers a broad swath of the issues facing the nation, including the nation's attitude towards gays and lesbians. There is resistance to the "Western idea" of accepting people for who they are, and MP Narynbek Maldobaev went so far as to call for an extermination, saying:

If it were up to me, I would round them up, the despicable criminals. I'd bring them to a public square and there I would publicly punish them.

When the interviewer asked for clarification on whether "punish" meant execute, Madobaev responded in the affirmative, saying that it would be, "In order to cleanse society." Rather than attempt genocide, the Kyrgyzstan government will be voting on a Russia-like anti gay propaganda bill and it looks like it's enactment will be just as oppressive and even more brutal.

You can watch the documentary, and fast-forward to 1:30 for the statements by Madobaev, AFTER THE JUMP...

Continue reading "Kyrgyzstan MP Calls For Public Extermination Of All Homosexuals: VIDEO" »


UN Urges Kyrgyzstan To Reject Russian Style Anti-Gay Law

6a00d8341c730253ef01b7c6f55abf970b-250wi (1)Following an overwhelming vote by Kyrgyz lawmakers in favor of a Russian-style ban on the promotion of positive attitudes towards so-called "non traditional sexual relations", Pink News reports that the United Nations has urged the former Soviet Republic to abandon the discriminatory law:

Spokesperson for the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR)Ravina Shamdasani said: “We call on the Kyrgyz Parliament and authorities to refrain from passing draft legislation that would embed in law discrimination against people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT).”

She added: “The proposed law would also violate fundamental human rights, including the rights to liberty, security and physical integrity and to freedom of expression, peaceful assembly and association. These rights are protected by human rights treaties ratified by Kyrgyzstan.”

[...]

Ms Shamdasani’s statement highlights the concern expressed by the UN with regards to previous incidents of violence and discrimination against LGBT people in Kyrgyzstan. She said:

“The draft law adds to those concerns and may lead to further violations.”

Ms Shamdasani further pointed out that: “The adoption of this law would also go against the commitments made by Kyrgyzstan during its Universal Periodic Review in the UN Human Rights Council in 2010.”

The bill still needs to pass two more readings before lawmakers can send the bill to President Almazbek Atambayev for his signature. The U.S. Embassy in Kyrgyzstan has also condemned the law. 

Previously, we reported on accounts brought forth by Human Rights Watch of gay men being targeted and tortured by police in Kyrgyzstan.


Kyrgyzstan Overwhelmingly Approves Russian-Style Anti-gay 'Propaganda' Ban

KyrgyzstanLawmakers in Kyrgyzstan have voted overwhelmingly in favor of a Russian-style ban on the promotion of positive attitudes towards "non-traditional sexual relations," Eurasianet reports:

The bill, which passed its first reading 79 to 7, will need to pass two more readings before the bill goes to Russian ally President Almazbek Atambayev for his signature. 

One of the bill’s authors, Kurmanbek Dyikanbayev, often sounds as if he is repeating Kremlin talking points. Dyikanbayev told Radio Azattyk last week that he sponsored the bill to protect Kyrgyzstan’s “traditional families.” He also blames Western democracy for moral degeneracy and for encouraging homosexuality.
 
Bishkek-based LGBT-rights organization Labrys, whose advocacy would be outlawed by the bill, notes that the legislation contradicts numerous human-rights provisions in Kyrgyzstan’s constitution. Nika Yuryeva of Labrys said she fears the bill will encourage more violence against the LGBT community.

The U.S. embassy in Kyrgyzstan released a statement earlier this week denouncing the bill:

"No one should be silenced or imprisoned because of who they are or whom they love. Laws that discriminate against one group of people threaten the fundamental rights of all people."

Back in January, Human Rights Watch published a disturbing report about police extortion and torture of gay men in the central Asian nation.  


U.S. Embassy Condemns Kyrgyzstan's 'Gay Propaganda' Law, Says It Harms Democracy

KyrgyzstanBack in March, an anti-gay "propaganda" law in the same vein as Russia's was introduced into Kyrgyzstan's parliament, infuriating Human Rights Watch and other pro-gay organizations. The U.S. government made no immediate moves to speak out against the bill, which would penalize those who aid in "'forming a positive attitude to untraditional sexual relations' among minors or in mass media" with jail sentences of up to a year. Now, the U.S. embassy in Kyrgyzstan has condemned the proposed legislation.

Yahoo! News reports:

"No one should be silenced or imprisoned because of who they are or whom they love. Laws that discriminate against one group of people threaten the fundamental rights of all people," the U.S. embassy in Kyrgyzstan said in a statement.

"Sweeping limits on civil society harm democracy."

There are strict processes in place for passing legislation in Kyrgyzstan: the bill must go through three readings and votes, and then be signed by the sitting president. Kyrgyz leaders maintain that the outcome is unclear while western press is more sure it will pass.

"It is unclear how this bill will move in (Kyrgzstan's) parliament. The draft law is still at a very early stage, and so far no one is ready to comment on it," said Kyrgyz presidential spokesman Kadyr Toktogulov.

However, both pro-government and opposition factions in the legislature have already mostly spoken in favor of the proposed law, with some deputies calling for making it even tougher.

Whatever the outcome in Kyrgyzstan, let's hope that no more anti-gay propaganda laws become a reality. The ill-effects on the LGBTQ community in Russia have been more than evident.


Kyrgyzstan Introduces Russian-style Anti-Gay Bill

The ex-Soviet country of Kyrgyzstan looks to be following squarely in the footsteps of Russia in its treatment of gays, as a new bill introduced in parliament on Wednesday seeks to make any statement that creates “a positive attitude to unconventional sexual orientation” a crime punishable by a up to one year in jail. 

Buzzfeed reports:

Kyrgyzstan“The goal of this bill is the safety and protection of the traditional family, and the human, moral and historical values of Kyrgyz society, by limiting the spread of information comprising the formation of positive attitudes to nontraditional forms of sexual relations,” the bill reads.

The bill seeks to limit “the spread of media, photos, video, written materials that include open and hidden calls to nontraditional sexual relations (homosexuality, lesbianism and other forms of nontraditional sexual behavior.” It also seeks to restrict “the organization of and participation in peaceful gatherings that aim to make available to society any information regarding positions on any form of nontraditional sexual relations.”

Human Rights Watch has already come out strongly against the bill, saying it would “violate Kyrgystan’s constitution as well as international human rights law on nondiscrimination, freedom of expression, association, and assembly,”

“This draconian bill is blatantly discriminatory against LGBT people and would deny citizens across Kyrgyzstan their fundamental rights,” said Hugh Williamson, Europe and Central Asia director at Human Rights Watch. “The sponsors of this homophobic bill should withdraw it immediately, and the government and political parties should speak out against such legislation, making clear it has no place in Kyrgyzstan.”

The Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe, which is due to consider Kyrgyzstan’s application for special “Partnership for Democracy” status with it on April 8, should send a strong message that the bill is unacceptable, and make clear that partnership status is wholly incompatible with legislation of this kind.

According to Anna Kirey of Human Rights Watch, a 30-day comment period has begun now that the bill has been published online, after which it can be taken up by parliament.


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