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04/19/2007


New Owner of ‘Newsweek’ Magazine Believes Homosexuality Can Be Cured

Davis_uzac

In a new profile piece, The Guardian looks at the religious underpinnings of Newsweek’s new owners Johnathan Davis [above left] and Etienne Uzac [above right]. 

Davis, whose company IBT Media acquired the magazine last year, is apparently a strong proponent of conversion therapy for gays. 

Christopher doyleIn a Facebook post in February 2013, Davis described as "shockingly accurate" an op-ed article written by Christopher Doyle [right], the director of the International Healing Foundation (IHF), which works to convert gay people. Davis said it “cuts like a hot knife through a buttery block of lies”.

Doyle, who once identified as gay but is now married to a woman, wrote that “same-sex attractions” are typically felt by people born with a “sensitive nature” and then subjected to “early sexual initiation and/or sexual abuse” or unusual attachment issues with their parents. He said last week that he was delighted by Davis’s praise. “Considering how much of the media is very gay-friendly, this is a breath of fresh air,” he said.

You may also remember Christopher Doyle for his help in organizing 'Ex-Gay Pride Month' last July, which was forcibly cancelled as a result of undisclosed (read=imaginary) "anti-ex-gay extremism."

When asked to comment about his Facebook post in support of Doyle's claims, Davis responded:

Whether I do or not [believe that], I’m not sure how that has any bearing on my capacity here as the founder of the company. I’m not sure how it’s relevant. People believe all sorts of weird things. But from a professional capacity, it’s unrelated.”

Gawker is also reporting that yesterday Davis sent a company-wide memo touting his commitment to diversity, saying:

I want to reiterate to all of you that our company, myself included, has and always will respect diversity in our workplace. This is reflected not only in our daily work but also in our hiring and personnel practices. Our team members are hired and retained based solely on their ability to perform the task.

We welcome and support a diverse range of opinions and values. We believe this diversity is critical to success as a world-class journalism organization, and also creates a richer and more productive culture and environment for all of us.

[photo via Forbes]


Tina Brown on Newsweek's Cover: 'Obama Earns Every Stripe in That Gay-Lo'

Gaylo

Brandon posted Newsweek's new cover over the weekend.

Editor Tina Brown tells Politico today:

“If President Clinton was the ‘first black president’ then Obama earns every stripe in that ‘gaylo’ with last week’s gay marriage proclamation. Newsweek’s cover pays tribute to his newly ordained place in history."


New 'Newsweek' Cover: The First Gay President

Here's the cover of the new Newsweek:

NewsweekCover

The headline tries for wit in its unsubtle recollection of a profile of Bill Clinton authored by Toni Morrison, entitled "Clinton as the First Black President," which appeared in the New Yorker in 1998. In it, Morrison wrote:

Years ago, in the middle of the Whitewater investigation, one heard the first murmurs: white skin notwithstanding, this is our first black President. Blacker than any black person who could ever be elected in our children's lifetime. After all, Clinton displays almost every trope of blackness: single-parent household, born poor, working-class, saxophone-playing, McDonald's-and-junk-food loving boy from Arkansas.

Andrew Sullivan's Newsweek story has yet to be posted to the web, so there's no telling if he's written similarly of Barack Obama. Hard to imagine he would. I'm pretty sure Obama's never "displayed" any gay "tropes," if such things exist at all.


'Newsweek' Drops 1960's-styled issue for 'Mad Men' Return, Ads Included

Newsweek_madmen

Today, Newsweek heads back to 1965, dropping a retro issue inspired by Mad Men's return.

Ad Age reports:

The "Mad Men"-themed issue can't include one big category from the 1960's: tobacco advertising, which Newsweek no longer accepts. But Newsweek is trying to interest other marketers in either reviving their own ads' look from the time or, for newer brands, imagining how their ads would have looked in those days.

"We've challenged agencies and clients to do '60s-inspired creative, but for modern messages and products," said Rob Gregory, president at Newsweek Daily Beast.

"It's analogous to when the NFL has a game and the teams wear their vintage uniforms," he added. "It's a nod to retro style, but it's a live game and it counts."


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