Best gay blog. Towleroad Wins Award

Pope Benedict Hub



04/19/2007


Cardinal Dolan on 'Meet the Press': Pope is Not for Civil Unions, and It Would Make Me Uncomfortable — VIDEO

T_dolan

On today's Meet the Press, David Gregory asked NYC Cardinal Timothy Dolan about the Pope's statements this week that seemed to suggest the Catholic Church might support civil unions.

Said Dolan:

“He didn't come right out and say he was for them. Once again in an extraordinarily open, sincere, nuanced way, he said 'I know that some people in some states have chosen this. We  need to think about that and look in look into it and see the reasons that have driven them.' It wasn't as if he came right out and approved them. But in a sensitivity that has won the heart of the world, he said, 'Rather than quickly condemn them, let's see. Let's just ask the questions as to why that has appealed to certain people."

Gregory then asked Dolan if that would make him personally uncomfortable.

Said Dolan:

"The civil unions? It would. It would in a way, David, because I don't think, um, marriage between one man and one woman forever, leading to life and love. That's not something that is just a sacramental religious concern. You bet it is that. And that's how God is elevated into making a sacrament. But it's also the building block of society and culture. So it belongs to culture. And if we water down that sacred meaning of marriage in any way I worry that not only the church would suffer, I worry that culture and society would."

Watch, AFTER THE JUMP...

Continue reading "Cardinal Dolan on 'Meet the Press': Pope is Not for Civil Unions, and It Would Make Me Uncomfortable — VIDEO" »


Popes Collaborate on New Text That Reiterates Catholic Church's Opposition to Gay Marriage

Popes

Pope Benedict XVI and Pope Francis have collaborated on a new Encyclical, a papal circular letters addressed to Roman Catholic clergy intended to summarise a pontiff's thoughts on a particular facet of Church life.

The piece of writing released yesterday was begun by Benedict and completed by Francis and reiterates the Catholic church's position rejecting same-sex marriage, the AAP reports:

Francis paid tribute to pope emeritus Benedict XVI in the encyclical, saying that the ex-pontiff had "almost completed" the text before stepping down in a historic resignation this year and that he himself had merely added "further contributions."

The 82-page text stresses that there is no contradiction between the Catholic faith and the modern world and calls for more dialogue with scientists, other religions and non-believers.

It also restates the Catholic Church's position on marriage saying it should be a "stable union of man and woman."
"This union is born of their love, as a sign and presence of God's own love, and of the acknowledgment and acceptance of the goodness of sexual differentiation," reads the text.

While some passages in the encyclical have a more academic and ponderous feel characteristic of Benedict XVI, others contain the simpler expressions and brighter outlook of his successor.


Pope Francis Says 'Gay Lobby' Exists Within Vatican

Pope Francis has admitted the existence of a "gay lobby" within the Vatican, AFP reports:

FrancisBack in February Italian media claimed that a secret report by cardinals investigating the leaks included allegations of corruption and blackmail attempts against gay Vatican clergymen, and on the other hand, favouritism based on gay relationships.

"In the Curia, there are truly some saints, but there is also a current of corruption," the pope is quoted as having said during an audience last week with CLAR (the Latin American and Caribbean Confederation of Religious Men and Women).

"There is talk of a 'gay lobby' and it's true, it exists. We have to see what can be done," the 76-year-old pontiff is quoted as saying on the Reflection and Liberation website, which was flagged up by religious news agencies on Tuesday.

Vatican spokesman Federico Lombardi told AFP: "It was a private meeting, I have no comment to make."

Previously...
Report: 'Gay Lobby' Within Vatican Influenced Pope's Resignation [tlrd]


Two Popes Come Together: VIDEO

Popes

Pope Benedict met his successor Pope Francis at the papal retreat at Castel Gandolfo on Saturday afternoon, USA Today reports:

The two popes embraced on the helipad when Francis' helicopter arrived, Vatican spokesman Rev. Federico Lombardi said on Vatican Radio. The two were dressed in white, with Pope Francis wearing a cape and sash to distinguish himself from Benedict, who wore a simple white cassock.

When the duo went to the chapel, Lombardi said Benedict offered Francis the traditional kneeler used by the pope, but Francis wanted the pair to kneel together on the same pew, saying, "We are brothers."

Here's a pool video of their meeting.

Watch, AFTER THE JUMP...

Continue reading "Two Popes Come Together: VIDEO" »


GLAAD President Joins CNN to Discuss Expectations the Pope Might Inspire Shift on Gay Issues: VIDEO

Glaadpope

CNN's Carol Costello welcomed Catholics United Executive Director James Salt and GLAAD President Herndon Graddick Thursday morning to talk about Pope Francis and whether or not a shift is expected on gay issues.

Graddick reacted to his statement yesterday that he hoped that a new Pope might signal a shift in attitudes:

"For decades the Catholic hierarchy has been in need of desperate reform. In his life, Jesus condemned gays zero times. In Pope Benedict's short time in the papacy, he made a priority of condemning gay people routinely. This, in spite of the fact, that the Catholic hierarchy had been in collusion to cover up the widespread abuse of children within its care. We hope this Pope will trade in his red shoes for a pair of sandals and spend a lot less time condemning and a lot more time foot-washing."

Watch, AFTER THE JUMP...

Continue reading "GLAAD President Joins CNN to Discuss Expectations the Pope Might Inspire Shift on Gay Issues: VIDEO" »


New Pope Francis a Veteran at Dealing with Anger Over the Church's Anti-Gay Stance: His Quotes in Context

Yesterday I posted some quotes from Cardinal Jorge Borgoglio, now known as Pope Francis I, related to his thoughts on same-sex marriage and gay adoption.

FrancisThe latter set of quotes, in which Bergoglio called same-sex marriage "the destructive attempt to end God's plan," came from a letter he wrote to a group of nuns that was never supposed to be made public, though when it did, the church drew backlash from Argentina's secular population, Buzzfeed's J. Lester Feder explains in an excellent piece bringing context to these quotes.

After the letter was exposed, and its damage evident, this happened, Feder explains:

When it became clear that stopping the marriage law would be impossible, the church may have tacitly given its backing to a civil union law as a way to head off the marriage bill. Senator Liliana Negre de Alonso, a member of Opus Dei and one of the politicians most closely linked to the Catholic Church, sponsored the civil union bill. (This would be like Rick Santorum having endorsed a civil union law in the United States.) It went nowhere. During the debate, the leader of the majority party reduced her to tears while calling her a "Nazi" for backing legislation that would create a "separate-but-equal" status for same-sex couples.

After that, the church noticeably moderated its tone when fighting social issues. During a debate over changes to the civil code in 2012, which included sensitive reproduction issues like surrogacy and the handling of fertilized eggs, the church tread far more lightly — making their case but avoiding the strong language that cost them support in 2010.

"Today they come with a stance that is much more receptive to another point of view," said the chairman of the committee leading the civil code reforms back in August 2012.

How much this experience has moderated Bergoglio himself remains to be seen. He was replaced as the leader of the Argentine church by Archbishop José María Arancedo, who is known for having a far less belligerent manner than Bergoglio.

We can hope that it has moderated Bergoglio, but, of course, that remains to be seen.

Feder notes that it has given Bergoglio a bit of practice in dealing with certain situations:

Bergoglio understands far better than his predecessor the challenges of opposing the tide in favor of same-sex marriage in countries where the church is embattled on many fronts...If the position of the church itself does not change, Bergoglio — now Pope Francis — may nonetheless have a more grounded sense of how to lead an institution in countries where its policy positions are dividing it from the people it hopes to reach.

We'll see.

In related news on character, David Mixner notes Bergoglio's silence during Argentina's "dirty war" in which "between 15,000 to 30,000 artists, writers, students, intellectuals, trade unionists and even priest were brutally killed, often tortured and their bodies thrown out of airplanes over the ocean."

He writes:

The Catholic Church at the best was silent about the 'missing' and supported the military junta when it was in power and conducting the mass killings from 1976 to 1983. In fact, the church handed over two priests who refused to adhere to the church's support for the military's dirty war and they became among the missing.

What we do know with certainty from that period is that the new Pope remained silent about the killing, torture and dumping.


Trending



Towleroad - Blogged