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I'm Gay, LGBT: The 57 Most Powerful Coming Outs of 2013

2013

UPDATED!!!

Due to four notable December announcements - from an Australian actor, a professional marksman, an Olympic figure skater, and a beloved morning TV show host, we've updated this list to provide a more complete look back at those who decided to come out in 2013. Enjoy.

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"I would like to consider myself a 'whatever,' Maria Bello said this month in a column in the New York Times, revealing that after two relationships with men (one of which produced a child) she had fallen in love with a woman.

Bello's decision to come out while consciously eschewing a label is a sentiment echoed by many of those on this year's list who felt no need to declare themselves L-G-B or T but still found it necessary for some reason, like Hot97 DJ Mister Cee, to declare their "sexual freedom".

The British Olympic diver Tom Daley told UK talk show host Jonathan Ross, "Everything is all pretty new so I don't see any point in putting a label on it - gay, bi, straight, any of those kind of labels. All that I feel happy about at the moment is that I'm dating a guy and couldn't be happier, it shouldn't matter who I'm dating and I hope people can be happy for me."

Actress Michelle Rodriguez echoed that fluidity in a characteristically blunt manner, responding to people who call her a "lesbo":  "Eh, they're not too far off. I've gone both ways. I do as I please. I am too f---ing curious to sit here and not try when I can. Men are intriguing. So are chicks."

High school senior Jacob Rudolph went another route, adopting all the labels. He told his high school class, in a video that went viral: "I've been acting every single day of my life. You see, I've been acting as someone I'm not. Most of you see me every day. You see me acting the part of 'straight' Jacob, when I am in fact LGBT."

RudolphRudolph later told Thomas Roberts: "I intended to come out as an LGBT and not say bisexual or gay or straight because I feel like those are the labels of the past. Especially in modern times when people are really questioning who they like and what they like I think that saying 'I'm bisexual', it could change in the future, I could be exclusively for one sex or another. So I think that putting it in a more general term like LGBT is extraordinarily appropriate even though I'm not a lesbian or a transgender."

But while the eschewing of labels is a major trend this year, there are still plenty of people happy to declare, "I'm gay" — though fewer are doing it on the front covers of magazines and many more are using more subtle forms of delivery, like the mention of a "husband" or "partner' buried in the third page of a magazine profile, or by posting an Instagram photo with a significant other.

One thing is certain. The act of coming out in 2013 remains as powerful as ever. Though tolerance, acceptance and equality have made great strides this year, there are still many pockets of the U.S., and certainly many countries abroad where LGBT people are forced to hide because being open about their sexuality would threaten their lives and their livelihoods.

Though coming out might be greeted more and more with comments like "yawn", "No disrespect intended, but DUH!", or "who cares?" from the social media peanut gallery, we should applaud the trolls in these cases, because they're one more example that progress is being made.

Who had the 52 Most Powerful Coming Outs of 2013 (so far)?

Find out (in alphabetical order), AFTER THE JUMP...

Continue reading "I'm Gay, LGBT: The 57 Most Powerful Coming Outs of 2013" »


Robbie Rogers Says Not a Single Gay Player Has Reached Out to Him

Rogers

LA Galaxy player Robbie Rogers, who came out of the closet earlier this year, says no gay players have reached out to him, the BBC reports:

"I haven't received a letter or text or anything from one footballer that wants to talk about these issues," he said.

He thinks that is because players are too scared to do so.

"I've received phone calls and I've spoken with all my friends here in the UK and around the world that have supported me, but I haven't had one message from a [gay] footballer," he told BBC Newsnight. "It reminds me of the fear that I had - you remember that atmosphere and how it made you feel. It just shows there's a huge problem. What do you do to change that, do you try to support them to create an environment that would support them to come out and they would feel comfortable in? It's really tough."

(photo - Rogers (left) with boyfriend Greg Berlanti and the Pres., via Instagram)


I'm Gay, LGBT, 'Whatever': The 53 Most Powerful Coming Outs of 2013

2013

UPDATE: See the updated version of this post HERE!

"I would like to consider myself a 'whatever,' Maria Bello said this month in a column in the New York Times, revealing that after two relationships with men (one of which produced a child) she had fallen in love with a woman.

Bello's decision to come out while consciously eschewing a label is a sentiment echoed by many of those on this year's list who felt no need to declare themselves L-G-B or T but still found it necessary for some reason, like Hot97 DJ Mister Cee, to declare their "sexual freedom".

The British Olympic diver Tom Daley told UK talk show host Jonathan Ross, "Everything is all pretty new so I don't see any point in putting a label on it - gay, bi, straight, any of those kind of labels. All that I feel happy about at the moment is that I'm dating a guy and couldn't be happier, it shouldn't matter who I'm dating and I hope people can be happy for me."

Actress Michelle Rodriguez echoed that fluidity in a characteristically blunt manner, responding to people who call her a "lesbo":  "Eh, they're not too far off. I've gone both ways. I do as I please. I am too f---ing curious to sit here and not try when I can. Men are intriguing. So are chicks."

High school senior Jacob Rudolph went another route, adopting all the labels. He told his high school class, in a video that went viral: "I've been acting every single day of my life. You see, I've been acting as someone I'm not. Most of you see me every day. You see me acting the part of 'straight' Jacob, when I am in fact LGBT."

RudolphRudolph later told Thomas Roberts: "I intended to come out as an LGBT and not say bisexual or gay or straight because I feel like those are the labels of the past. Especially in modern times when people are really questioning who they like and what they like I think that saying 'I'm bisexual', it could change in the future, I could be exclusively for one sex or another. So I think that putting it in a more general term like LGBT is extraordinarily appropriate even though I'm not a lesbian or a transgender."

But while the eschewing of labels is a major trend this year, there are still plenty of people happy to declare, "I'm gay" — though fewer are doing it on the front covers of magazines and many more are using more subtle forms of delivery, like the mention of a "husband" or "partner' buried in the third page of a magazine profile, or by posting an Instagram photo with a significant other.

One thing is certain. The act of coming out in 2013 remains as powerful as ever. Though tolerance, acceptance and equality have made great strides this year, there are still many pockets of the U.S., and certainly many countries abroad where LGBT people are forced to hide because being open about their sexuality would threaten their lives and their livelihoods.

Though coming out might be greeted more and more with comments like "yawn", "No disrespect intended, but DUH!", or "who cares?" from the social media peanut gallery, we should applaud the trolls in these cases, because they're one more example that progress is being made.

Who had the 52 Most Powerful Coming Outs of 2013 (so far)?

Find out (in alphabetical order), AFTER THE JUMP...

Continue reading "I'm Gay, LGBT, 'Whatever': The 53 Most Powerful Coming Outs of 2013" »


LA Galaxy Player Robbie Rogers Dating 'Arrow' Creator Greg Berlanti

Berlanti_rogers
(instagram)

LA Galaxy player Robbie Rogers, who back in June told MTV News that he was single, is apparently single no longer. TMZ reports that he's dating Greg Berlanti, creator of Arrow and producer of Brothers & Sisters, Everwood, and Dawson's Creek, among others.

Sources tell us Robbie and Greg began dating sometime around May ... roughly 3 months after Robbie went public with his sexuality for the first time.

The two haven't exactly tried to keep their relationship a secret -- they've been spotted at several major events together over the past few months.

 


Gay L.A. Galaxy Player Robbie Rogers Shirtless for the OUT100: PHOTO

Rogers

OUT magazine has begun revealing portraits from its annual OUT100 list of the year's most compelling LGBT people, among them this sexy look at out L.A. Galaxy player Robbie Rogers by photographer Danielle Levitt.

Other shots include Ian McKellen, playwright Tarell Alvin McCraney, Guillermo Diaz, Cason Crane, Frank Bruni, Paul Iacono, and Janet Mock.

Robbie Rogers To Write Memoir

Robbie Rogers' year just keeps getting better. Plans are in the works for him to co-write book about his life as an openly gay Major League Soccer star. Rogers posted a message on Facebook announcing the news:

"Soccer and writing are my two biggest passions. I am so lucky to be given the opportunity to write my memoir with Penguin Books. So many people helped me with my struggles while I was coming out, I hope this book will do the same for people who feel a bit like me."

6a00d8341c730253ef0192aaa6cde4970d-250wiThe official press Penguin Books release contains details of what to expect from the memoir, titled Coming Out To Play:

Coming Out To Play will tell the story of Rogers' hard-fought though ultimately triumphant transformation from a troubled, isolated child to a groundbreaking and praiseworthy professional sportsman- one who has mustered the courage to write and act upon the secret he held for years. Robbie has finally broken his silence: "Secrets can cause so much internal damage. People love to preach about honesty. Try explaining to your loved ones after twenty-five years you are gay. Life is only complete when your loved ones know you. When they know your true feelings, when they know who and how you love. Life is simple when your secret is gone. Gone is the pain that lurks in the stomach at work, the pain from avoiding questions, and at last the pain from hiding such a deep secret."

"In addition to being a soccer superstar, Robbie is poised to be a role model for a new generation of gay and lesbian youth," commented Patrick Nolan. "His courage to share his personal story will make it easier for others who follow. I am proud to be publishing his memoir."

Beyond providing compelling insights into the world of professional athletes, Coming Out To Play will be the first of its kind- a deeply personal account of what it's like to be openly gay in professional locker rooms, 60,000-seat stadiums full of raucous crowds, and a sports universe that's only now becoming hospitable to gay people.

Look for Penguin to publish the book as a paperback original sometime in late 2014.


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