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Scruff Ranks Cities and States By Body Hair

Scruff

As part of a new installment on its blog called "SCRUFFtistics" gay dating app SCRUFF took an "in-FUR-mative" look at the state of manscaping in America, attempting to determine where in the U.S. guys like it hairy and where smooth is in. The results?

"Cold winter days, and warm wet summers - those who live in environments like this appear to be suited for it. For example, winter in Vermont sure can be brutal, so we hope that it's rank as the hairiest state proves beneficial in warming up the fellas there. Hawaii, you seem to be as smooth as the surfers who ride your rough waves."

Indeed, individuals in colder climates did on average tend to favor letting the hair grow, with Maine, Oregon, New Hampshire, and West Virginia being the hairiest. On the other hand, warmer climates see more smooth-bodied men, as the below map indicates. Yet there were a few outliers: while Hawaii, Puerto Rico and Nevada were the top 3 "smoothest" states, they were followed quickly by Alaska and South Dakota. "What's that about?" Scruff wonders.

Map

As for cities, Everett, WA, Evansville, IN, Portland, OR, Manchester, NH and Alexandria, VA saw the most down. Whereas Fayetteville, NC, North Las Vegas, NV, Murrieta, GA, Elk Grove, CA and Temecula, CA prefer to keep things more manicured.

Cities

Check out the full results here.


New Dating App Survey Reveals Interesting Figures On Gay Dating, Hook-Up Habits: INFOGRAPHIC

GrabhimA study conducted by grabhim.net found interesting data pertaining to gay mens’ dating and hookup app habits ranging from how often they send pictures of their genitals to how many users actually meet and/ or hookup with in a single month. The study consisted of asking 4,000 gay men, over the course of four weeks, to fill out a 19-question online survey centered around a general premise; how do gay men act on an app? 

The most surprising figures show that 83 percent of the 4,000 gay men polled in the study have sent pictures of their penis to another user, with only 17 percent saying they don’t send those types of pictures. Around 76 percent said they respond honestly when another user asks them about their penis size with only 3 percent saying they exaggerate their size. Most surprising of all is that 43 percent of users have not met anyone they met on the app in person within the last month; 24 percent state they physically met only one person they met online within the last month.

Unsurprisingly, 45 percent of users said they prefer a date but will go with a hookup if it seems right, while 24 percent of users solely look for hookups. Disappointing numbers show HIV stigma exists as 28 percent of men said they were unlikely to initiate contact or respond favorably to attractive men who state they’re HIV positive in their profiles, with another 29 percent saying it is highly unlikely they would do so either. Around 43 percent of HIV positive users state they disclose their status on their profile, with another 31 percent saying they disclose their status before physically meeting; only 10 percent don’t disclose their status unless asked. Surprisingly only 45 percent of guys who actually meet up don’t hook up at all, although when they do 50 percent choose to do it at home, while 50 percent pick neutral locations.

The study found that a majority of users are between 18-50 years old, with 29 percent using Grindr and 16 percent using Scruff however, the study doesn’t give those polled an option to select more than one dating app option.

Check out the full infographic, AFTER THE JUMP...

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Scruff Posts Huge Gay Ad On Billboard Outside University Of Phoenix Stadium Ahead of Super Bowl Sunday

Scruff1

It looks like Scruff is appealing toward its “masc4masc” demographic as the dating/hookup app bought a billboard outside of University of Phoenix Stadium ahead of the Super Bowl and posted a 48-foot ad featuring two guys in a locker room sizing each other up with the slogan "Play On Our Team," reports Refinery29. A press release from Scruff explains why they bought the Super Bowl themed ad.

Said Scruff:

"At a time when professional NFL players like Michael Sam and Kwame Harris bravely come out to the world and some coaches admit to not wanting gay players on their teams, [Scruff]... is sending a message to the NFL — by putting up a Phoenix billboard advertisement that’s certain to start a conversation about perception and acceptance among both gay and straight sports fans."

Scruff's bold move to challenge the NFL on its homophobia may elicit homophobic criticism and condemnation from sports fans and players alike, that is if the scores of straight men pouring into the stadium on Sunday can even figure out what Scruff even is. 


If Guys Acted in Real Life the Way They Do on Gay Apps: VIDEO

Appholes

Perhaps you're familiar with a few of these 'appholes'?

Watch, AFTER THE JUMP...

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It's Time To Rethink Online Gay Social Networks

  Screenshot 2014-12-11 14.20.17

The Interplay is a special biweekly series exploring the intersections of sex, pop culture, and current events.

BY CHARLES PULLIAM-MOORE

The writing is on the wall: we’ve (unsurprisingly) hit peak mobile application. In the early days of powerful mobile computing the idea of there being “an app for that” was radical. Creating virtual communities unbound by space, time, and economic circumstance was game changing for gay men across the world.

As the years have gone on, however, gay social networks that live on servers have flooded the market with variations of the same guy-on-a-grid experience. If Grindr, for example, is for everyone, then Scruff is for everyone with a little bit more body hair. Growlr’s the same, but for bears, and Daddyhunt’s focused primary on connecting strapping men of a certain age. Beneath slightly different coats of paint all of these applications are derivative of one another. It’s time that we demand more of them.

Last week Scruff’s Chief Product Officer Jason Marchant published an op-ed in the Huffington Post describing the steps Scruff has taken to work against the cultural stigma attached to being HIV-positive. Scruff, like an increasing number of mobile networking apps, is emphasizing the use of categorical filters to help its users find the kinds of guys they’re looking for without risk of being ostracized.    

“For "Poz" guys uncomfortable disclosing status in their profile, "HIV Status" presents a fraught choice: to answer "Negative" would be dishonest, but any other answer -- including no answer -- is often interpreted by other users as a tacit disclosure. It's also a problem for HIV negative guys searching for the same. Seeing "Negative" presented next to other profile "stats" conveys a false sense of permanence.

BluedRecently applications like Scruff have positioned themselves as valuable assets in efforts to curtail the spread of various STIs. As a part of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo’s plan to eradicate new HIV infections in the state by 2020, New York City began using Grindr and Scruff to inform gay men about pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Blued, a popular Chinese gay networking app, actively encourages its users to seek out HIV tests at its parent company’s office free of charge.  

All of these platforms want to be thought of as more than hookup apps, and gradually their platforms are trying to address the gay community’s needs other than sex. Other than public health outreach and offering free advertising space, however, the “social” experience of these networks seems to have plateaued. It doesn’t have to be that way, though.

CONTINUED, AFTER THE JUMP...

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SCRUFF CEO Explains The Security 'Flaw' Built Into All Location-Aware Apps

Screen Shot 2014-09-15 at 3.42.45 PMSCRUFF CEO Eric Silverberg took to The Huffington Post to give the internet a brief, but insightful, lesson in “trilateration,” the process through which a person’s specific location can be pinpointed with a few bits of information and a little bit of know-how.

“The most important thing you should know about location-based apps is this: Any app that shows relative distance between members can be used to pinpoint your location.” He explains. “While there are measures we have taken to protect our community, it's critical that all users understand the benefits and limitations intrinsic to location-based apps.”

All mobile social networking apps with geo-location functionality can approximate a user’s general location, Silverberg explains, but a basic understanding of geometry can easily reveal a user’s position even after deciding to turn off detailed GPS tracking features:

“If I know you are 1 mile away from me, but I don't know which direction, then the circumference of a circle, centered at my location, defines the set of possible places you could be. If I simply move to two other places and record your relative distance, with those three readings I can calculate your location.”

According to Silverberg SCRUFF has attempted to circumvent some of the security “flaws” inherent in all location-aware services by randomizing users’ location data on SCRUFF’s backend. Every phone or tablet using the SCRUFF app sends its location information back to app’s servers so that other users can request it upon tapping a profile. For those users who select to have their locations hidden from the general public, SCRUFF will go so far as to spoof where a person actually is.

“This means that, if [a user] lives in the West Village in NYC, he could potentially appear in between two people in SoHo,” said Silverberg.”[We also] take density into account, so if you live in the city, your location will be randomized by a few blocks, but in the country it could be a few miles or more.”


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