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Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-NY) Declares Victory Over Nan Hayworth in Tight House Race

With 100% reporting, out gay Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney appears to have defeated GOP challenger Nan Hayworth in his contentious 18th District House race.

MaloneyMaloney has 49.6% of the vote and Hayworth 48.0%.

Maloney has declared victory but Hayworth is not conceding with a difference of 1, 744 votes between them, The Hill reports:

In a statement, Maloney congratulated Hayworth "on a hard fought campaign" and vowed to reach across the aisle in search of common victories.

"We have fought this campaign as Democrats and Republicans but we must end it as Americans, proud of our common country and committed to put aide our partisan differences and work for the good of all," he said.

But Hayworth spokesman Terence Michos said in a statement that the race is "too close to call."

“The race is too close to call and the ballots have been impounded as the Maloney campaign requested over the weekend. They knew the race was incredibly close, and we agree,” Michos said.

The AP has yet to call the race.


Election Preview: 10 Races with LGBT Candidates to Watch on November 4

BY LISA KEEN

MapThis year’s election night is likely to be an important one for the LGBT history books: Voters in Massachusetts are expected to elect the nation’s first-ever openly gay state attorney general, and voters in Maine could very well elect the nation’s first-ever openly gay governor. Two candidates for Congress could well become the first openly gay Republican elected to the U.S. House and, if they both succeed, they will join what will number as the largest ever contingent of openly LGBT members of Congress—up from seven to as many as 12, if all newcomers are successful.

Add to this mix a large number of openly LGBT candidates around the country for various state and local offices.

These are the top 10 races to keep an eye on November 4:

Michaud1. Maine: U.S. Rep. Mike Michaud (pictured) is holding onto a narrow lead over incumbent Republican Paul LePage and progressive independent Eliot Cutler in a race for the governorship. If he’s successful, Michaud will become the first ever openly gay person elected governor. Collectively, the latest polls (see RealClearPolitics) show a virtual tie between Michaud and LePage, with Cutler siphoning off 16 points. But interestingly, the latest poll, from Bangor Daily News, showed Michaud up by six points over LePage. (Former New Jersey Governor Jim McGreevey came out as gay in 2004 while governor, then promptly resigned.) Michaud came out as gay one year ago in an op-ed, saying he didn’t want his campaign for governor to be undermined by “whisper campaigns.”

Healey2. Massachusetts: Attorney Maura Healey (pictured), a first-time candidate, won a stunning victory in the September primary against a well-entrenched incumbent Democrat –even pro-LGBT Governor Deval Patrick endorsed the incumbent. But Healey trounced former state Senator Warren Tolman by more than 24 points. She is largely expected to do the same with the Republican Party’s nominee John Miller. And, if successful, Healey will become the nation’s first openly gay person elected as a state attorney general. She is best known in the LGBT community for her work as assistant attorney general on the Massachusetts challenge to the Defense of Marriage Act, a lawsuit complementary to one led by Gay & Lesbian Advocates & Defenders.

Moulton3. Massachusetts: Former state Senator Richard Tisei almost made history two years ago when he narrowly missed becoming the first openly gay Republican to be elected to Congress. He’s back this year, seeking the same seat, and he’s holding onto a slight lead in some polls. The Democratic incumbent was the surprising loser in the September primary, so Tisei’s competition is Iraq War veteran Seth Moulton (pictured), the Democrat. LGBT newspaper publisher Sue O’Connell is backing Tisei; former U.S. Rep. Barney Frank is backing Moulton. Congress has had gay Republicans before –Steve Gunderson and Jim Kolbe. If elected, Tisei would become the first openly gay Republican elected to Congress.

Demaio4. California: Carl DeMaio (pictured) is the second person vying to become the first openly gay Republican elected to Congress, but his effort has been lost traction –first, by failing to win the support of the LGBT community, and, second, by being waylaid by a former campaign aide’s claim that DeMaio sexually harassed him. (San Diego County prosecutors announced just this week that they would not be pressing charges.) DeMaio, a former member of the San Diego City Council, is up against incumbent Democrat Scott Peters who has won endorsement from the Human Rights Campaign. Congressional District 52 is said to be evenly split between Democrats and Republicans. The latest poll, in early October, showed DeMaio with a three-point lead.

Maloney5. New York: First-term U.S. Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-NY18, pictured) is in a tough fight for re-election against a Republican opponent he beat two years ago. Maloney won his first-term by defeating incumbent Republican Nan Hayworth, who’s back for another round. Hayworth earned only a 71 rating from HRC in her one Congressional term.

C_aiken6. North Carolina: American Idol star Clay Aiken (pictured), a Democrat, is struggling to replace incumbent Republican U.S. Rep. Renee Ellmers, who represents the 2nd Congressional District in North Carolina, and earned a zero rating from HRC for two terms. Aiken has done well in fundraising from individuals, while Ellmers has relied on party funding, but polls still show Ellmers with a sizeable lead.

Eldridge7. New York: Sean Eldridge (pictured) is making an uphill climb to become a member of the LGBT Congressional Caucus representing New York’s Hudson Valley district (No. 19). His opponent is two-term Republican Chris Gibson. Eldridge, the spouse of Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes, has been criticized repeatedly for using the couple’s personal wealth to fund his campaign, while little mention is made that Gibson’s campaign depends primarily on finance, insurance, and investment entities. Eldridge is, of course, pro-gay marriage; Gibson supports only civil unions, claiming that marriage is a religious institution. He earned a 76 rating from HRC in the last Congressional session and a zero in his first term. The Eldridge camp released a poll Tuesday showing that he had closed a 28-point lead by Gibson in September to 10 points as of October 19.

Kuehl8. California: Former State Senator Sheila Kuehl (pictured) is in a tight race against Bobby Shriver, a nephew of the late President Kennedy, for the District 3 seat on the powerful Los Angeles County Board. Despite her long history with the LGBT community, Kuehl is struggling to keep up with Shriver, who has raised twice the cash she has and won the backing of gay media mogul David Geffen. But she did win the most votes in the June primary. And if elected to the seat, she would become the first openly gay person to serve on the Board.

Pankey9. Idaho: In a little publicized effort, third party openly gay candidate Steve Pankey is running for governor in Idaho. His chances are slim to none: He won only 13 percent of the vote in his 2010 race for lieutenant governor. The Idaho Statesman reported recently that he and two other candidates were splitting 12 percent in the polls. But Pankey was rejected by his own party –the Constitution Party—after he came out in support of marriage equality. Idaho is currently still fighting to defend its state marriage ban in federal court.

Catania10. Washington, D.C.: Popular D.C. Councilman David Catania is mounting a strong campaign to become the capitol city’s first openly gay mayor. Catania has been haunted somewhat by the fact that he was a Republican in the heavily Democratic city. But he switched to independent 10 years ago after a long-standing dispute with the Republicans over their anti-gay policies. Catania has earned a good reputation in his 17 years on the Council, but his effort may be hurt by the independent campaign of another former Republican Councilmember Carol Schwartz. And both Catania and Schwartz are up against the African American Democrat Muriel Bowser, who won the endorsement of the local gay Democratic club.

© copyright 2014 by Keen News Service. All rights reserved.


Gay Congressman Sean Patrick Maloney Marries Partner Of 22 Years

Maloney_florke

Sean Patrick Maloney, the first openly gay congressman from New York, married Randy Florke, his partner of 22 years on Saturday in Cold Spring, NY.

Florke, a real estate and design executive, proposed in December after the youngest of their three children wrote to Santa wishing that her parents could be married.

Philipstown.info reports that the guests "included Rep. Nancy Pelosi, the House Minority Leader or Democratic Party chief in the House; Rep. Steny Hoyer of Maryland, the Democratic Party Whip or assistant House leader; and Rep. Joe Kennedy, another Democrat, from Massachusetts. However, Former President Bill Clinton and his wife, Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, were not present."

In a statement, Maloney and Florke said:

“Even after 22 years together, we’re overwhelmed by how blessed we feel to celebrate this special day with our friends and family. With our three kids by our side, this couldn’t have been a more perfect day. Thank you to all our friends near and far for their love and support as we continue to fight to ensure all families can experience the joys of a lifetime commitment.”

Maloney, who represents the lower Hudson Valley region, is the second sitting member of Congress to legally marry his same-sex partner while in office.

(image via USA Today)


Monday Speed Read: Illinois, Maryland Trans Rights, Obama Pride, Gallup, Afghanistan

BY LISA KEEN / Keen News Service

IllinoisILLINOIS LAW ENACTED: 

Several county clerks around Illinois opened their offices Sunday so that same-sex couples could obtain marriage licenses on the first day the state legislature’s new marriage equality law went into effect, June 1. Clerks in 16 counties have been issuing licenses to same-sex couples since February, when a federal district court judge ruled the state’s ban on same-sex marriage unconstitutional. The Chicago Sun Times reported yesterday that 1,635 same-sex couples had married by the close of business Friday.

MarylandREFERENDUM FAILS IN MARYLAND:

Equality Maryland leaders were at the Maryland Secretary of State’s office until midnight Saturday, waiting to see if opponents of a recently signed law protecting transgender citizens would be subjected to a referendum. But midnight came and opponents delivered no signatures, so there will be no referendum this year. A message posted on the group’s website indicates it came up 1,000 signatures short of the number it needed to proceed to the ballot. Carrie Evans, executive director of Equality Maryland, credited her group’s aggressive approach to stopping the referendum. “We had supporters across the state standing right next to petition gatherers and we saw first-hand voters change their minds and not sign the mean-spirited petition,” said Evans. “While some criticized our approach, we felt an obligation to the thousands of transgender Marylanders and the people who love and support them to do everything in our power to defend it, not just be quiet and wait to see what happens.” The new law is due to take effect October 1.

Blue_obamaPRESIDENTIAL PROCLAMATION:

President Obama issued a presidential proclamation of June as LGBT Pride Month, noting “As progress spreads from State to State, as justice is delivered in the courtroom, and as more of our fellow Americans are treated with dignity and respect, our Nation becomes not only more accepting, but more equal as well.” It also noted that “we recommit ourselves to completing the work that remains.”

NO HINT OF EXECUTIVE ORDER:

Any hope that some might have harbored that President Obama would take the opportunity of Pride Month to issue an executive order prohibiting discrimination by federal contractors appeared to be dampened by the president’s Pride Month proclamation. “LGBT workers in too many states can be fired just because of their sexual orientation or gender identity;” the proclamation says, adding, “I continue to call on the Congress to correct this injustice by passing the Employment Non-Discrimination Act.”

PUBLIC SUPPORT GROWING:

A Gallup Poll released Friday indicates that 63 percent of Americans support the right of gay couples to adopt children. And a separate Gallup Poll Saturday showed 58 percent consider “gay and lesbian relations” to be morally acceptable. Gallup noted that, when the adoption question was first asked in 1992, only 29 percent supported the right of gay couples to adopt. “Americans have reached consensus faster about same-sex couples adopting children than about support for gay marriage in the last 20 years,” states Gallup, noting that only 55 percent of the public supports allowing same-sex couples to marry.

MaloneyMALONEY TRAVEL COMPANIONS:

Gay U.S. Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-NY) was part of a six-member Congressional tour of Afghanistan over the Memorial Day weekend with right-wing Republican Reps. Michele Bachmann of Minnesota and Markwayne Mullin of Oklahoma. One of the three Democrats along for the ride was Rep. John Barrow of Georgia who scored a zero on the Human Rights Campaign’s Congressional scorecard.

© 2014 Keen News Service. All rights reserved.


Gay Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-NY) to Marry Partner of 21 Years

Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-NY) is engaged to marry his longtime partner Randy Florke, the Times-Herald Record reports:

MaloneySpokeswoman Stephanie Formas confirmed that Florke proposed to Maloney this past Christmas Day. The two have been together for 21 years and have three children together.

“After 21 years together, we are excited for the next step in our journey as a family. For decades, we've fought to ensure that all families can experience the joys of loving commitment and we are proud to have our friends and family share this special moment with us in the near future," read a statement provided by Formas.

Maloney referenced his relationship shortly after the Supreme Court struck down DOMA:

“I called my partner, Randy, of 21 years to tell him about the decision and to congratulate him and I really couldn’t get the words out. And I realized in that moment that it was the first time in 21 years, 20 of those years spent raising our 3 amazing children, that I wasn’t talking to him as someone who was seen as less than in the eyes of my own country’s laws.”

The paper adds:

Maloney, a first-term Congressman is facing a potential rematch against Nan Hayworth this year, a one-term Republican he defeated in 2012. As on November 2013, the 18th Congressional District had a Democratic enrollment edge of about 14,500 voters , with a little less than a quarter unaffiliated.

Maloney came under criticism in recent months for his votes with Republicans that precipitated and upheld the government shutdown, an action which earned him and Rep. Kyrsten Sinema the brand of "queer conservadems" from HuffPost editor and activist Michelangelo Signorile.

 


'Queer ConservaDems' Kyrsten Sinema and Sean Patrick Maloney Savaged for Joining GOP in Shutdown Vote

Bisexual Arizona Rep. Kyrsten Sinema and gay New York Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, both Democrats, voted with House GOP to shut down the government and are being taken to task by LGBT advocates for doing so, the Washington Blade reports:

Maloney“I strongly support the president’s decision to give employers more time to comply with the law, and I believe that we should give families the same flexibility we’re giving to our small businesses,” Maloney said.

Maloney also explained his support for eliminating health care subsidies for government employees by saying the playing field for public and private workers should be equal.

“Families and businesses in the Hudson Valley are not getting special subsidies from Obamacare and neither should members of Congress or the White House,” Maloney said.

In a separate statement, Sinema defended her votes by saying they ensure individuals can sign up for health care plans without “being punished” for failing to purchase adequate healthcare coverage.

SinemaMichelangelo Signorile tears them a new one in a new HuffPost piece:

Since taking office, Sinema has voted with the GOP against economic justice issues that progressives, including LGBT activists, view as crucial. Both she and U.S. Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-N.Y.), an openly gay former Clinton aide, also elected for the first time in 2012, have voted with big banks and Wall Street time and again. Right out of the gate, Maloney, who took a lot of Wall Street money, voted with the GOP on the debt ceiling early this year, and actually co-sponsored a bill that would roll back reforms of the very Wall Street practices that led to the economic collapse. He even voted with the GOP to take authority over the Keystone XL project from the president. Like Sinema, he also voted to jeopardize Obamacare or shut down the government. And he too was supported in his election campaign by the Gay and Lesbian Victory Fund, the Human Rights Campaign, and other gay and progressive groups, touted as a progressive.

Think about this: On what is arguably the most important debate in Congress, two of nine Democrats who voted with the tea party-led blackmailers are openly gay or bisexual. Two of only five openly gay or bisexual members of the House voted with the extreme far right to undermine the president. Veteran recording industry executive Howie Klein, the founder of the progressive Blue America PAC and an openly gay man himself, has been criticizing both of them for their votes for months. He told me that Sinema had been calling him throughout last year's campaign, looking for money. He'd known her and liked her, having served with her on the board of People for the American Way, but he told me that when he had her fully vetted, he was "horrified" by her record. Blue America is now actively recruiting a candidate to run in the Democratic primary against Sinema.

Some say it's better to have Democrats like Sinema and Maloney than to possibly have a Republican in the seat. If it means they have to vote with the GOP, especially if the vote isn't pivotal, then so be it, the thinking goes. But that breeds the most cynical kind of politics and drives people away from participating when we need to bring them in.

The Blade adds:

Sinema and Maloney have been active on LGBT-specific issues since their election to Congress. They voted for an LGBT-inclusive version of the Violence Against Women Act reauthorization and signed a friend-of-the-court brief urging the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down the Defense of Marriage Act.

Dana Beyer, a Chevy Chase, Md.,-based transgender activist, said the LGBT community shouldn’t judge Sinema and Maloney too harshly for their votes because “these late night political machinations are generally theater” and don’t say anything about the lawmakers’ overall voting records.

“This issue isn’t about the LGBT community; it’s about America,” Beyer said. “They should be judged on a much broader set of criteria and values than this one vote, and I hope people take the context into account.”

What do you think?

How should Sinema and Maloney be judged by this vote? Should we let it slide and be thankful there's no Republican in their seats, or are they, as blogger Mike Rogers told the Blade, "DINOs (Democrats in Name Only)" and "sellouts" who Signorile suggested in a tweet should "meet the fate of Christine Quinn."


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