Comments

  1. the queen says

    oh honey, this made my day, reminds me of the days when i was doing the drag shows with some pretty tough street queens who scared the hell out of me and were nobody to mess with, not with them carrying straight razors and scissors in their purses and then some. and they could certainly defend themselves and were the masters of reading and i don’t mean x-tian science reading room either… i applaud these tough warriors of gaydom and anybody who puts them down gay or straight only betrays their fundamental ignorance and self-loathing. r-e-s-p-e-c-t find out what it means to me.

  2. jeff says

    That was a old video, and, a broke down drag queen like that, not that funny, picking on the obviously mentally challenged! If, she is going to go out in public in drag, at least try to look and act fierce, that was more like a straight guy on Halloween.

  3. yeahisaidit says

    …although the image and taste of these queens are questionable after seeing pics and vids of brutal gay bashings on this site you just kind of wish some of the bash victims had what it took to confront their attackers like this when all else fails…not to advocate violence or acting out but DEFENSE…!

  4. GM says

    While the rest of the closeted, preppy, Upper East Side homosexuals were drinking cocktails in their townhouses, these were the ones down in the Village hurling rocks and bricks and f***ing parking meters at the NYPD in order that we all could sit here today and read Andy’s blog and not fear for our well-being in so doing.

    I am an uptight white boy born in suburbia, but I recognize that I owe brave souls like this a huge debt of gratitude.

    THANK YOU, LADIES!

  5. Yeek says

    While I think the “sassy queen who doesn’t take any shit from nobody” is 99% mythological (along with the famous gay football star), these videos show that formidable 1%.

    Frankly I prefer violence myself. People expect it less from us gay folks, and it makes such an impression (especially if there’s a scar they have to look at the rest of their life).

    I know, I know, an eye for an eye leaves everyone blind, but I’d rather have everyone blind than be the only cyclops around.

  6. says

    I love the blonde girl! Shoe in one hand, shaking a can of mace in the other. I would argue weather the one with dark hair is actually a drag queen or just a man in drag… there is a difference!

    I love the blonde sisters strength, is is strangely inspiring, but also so sad that such a response is ever necessary. I doubt if either of those situations led to the perpetrators understanding and accepting anymore… but I know that sometimes a girl has got to do, what a girl has got to do!

  7. Marc says

    That was really, really lame!
    Fighting, or trying to, with a 12 year old?

    Really an over-the-top mess of a queen if you ask me.

    If I had have been witness to that, I would have thought the drag queen was a little crazy, or on drugs.

  8. Bobby says

    YES! Those fuckin’ bitches ROCK MY WORLD!!!
    Thank you for standing up to the bigots, big and small and making them think twice. Too many times most of us just sit and think “ignore it”, but it’s time to stop ignoring and start stomping ass.
    To those faggy prudes who think these Queens are “too much” or “poor taste”, when you’re getting your republican lovin’ ass whipped for being just as queer as the rest of us, you remember how those Queens dealt with it and you should do the same.

  9. Matty says

    Is there a reason why drag queens insist on talking with a black souther hooker twang regardless of the fact that they might not be southern or black?

    As for the videos, I fail to see the humor. Sad that gay men feel they have to behave like attention-seeking, loud, uneducated trash to make a point, it does nothing to help us as a community.

  10. Marc says

    I think this behavior is pathetic. Sure, those people were rude but that drag queen is a clown, literally, and is all bark and no bite. I guarantee you she would not be so sass-mouthy if she were up against bigger opponents — taking on a small child and an old man is hardly Stonewall courageous.

  11. David says

    Marc, she didn’t take him on because he is a child. That would be injury to a child, which is a felony. Maybe she’s smarter than you think.

    I have to say, I’m not the type to sit back and be abused. I’ve never started an argument with anyone, but I’ve finished a few. I don’t think you always have to be an example. Sometimes, it’s OK to teach a bully a lesson.

  12. Chad says

    I’ve had the great pleasure of knowing several drag queens, both as performers and out of drag (as regular guys), and they are the best friends you can have. I wouldn’t want to cross them, though, or there WOULD be hell to pay. Mace would be the least of the weapons my friends packed (they carried very small, lady-like guns in their purses).

    These people are often the most outcast of society and have to have very hard defense mechanisms to survive. My friends were always there for me, and we always had a blast…too bad they always seemed to suffer (along with me at the time) with alcohol & drug problems. There’s noone more fun at a party than a drunk drag queen with a gun!

  13. Joseph says

    With all due respect (and I was “raised” by drag queens so i *do* respect them), does no one think that, just maybe, these are publicity stunts? I mean, it sounded like the blonde *was* making a video on the train. And, just maybe, thousands/millions of internet viewers could help bring in the tips if they are also entertainers. Just thinking out loud… if what i say is not true, then props to the ladies for sticking up for themselves. I wish i would have done that when all my classmates were calling me faggot in high school.

  14. says

    wow. lots of different emotions here.

    i concur that it’s these queens who liberated us ALL from the collective closet.

    the dq on the el train: she is fierce. she is standing up and showing she won’t be pushed around. awesome.

    as for sharolaid; that is a comedic act. she is doing it for the laughs. is it always funny? no, not always, but i think it’s part of her whole thing. she just gives what the peeps ask for.

    as for clown drag etc etc. .. there are queens who ARE fierce and this is what they do. it is an art form. but so is not taking your drag too seriously.

    have a laugh folks! and if you don’t think it’s funny, then don’t watch.

    *snap*

  15. estremecido says

    Thank God for these bitches. So tired of these cowards who call people out in public venues where they know they’ll be protected by the silent majority who more than than not won’t do anything because they don’t want to get involved. You know these two fuckers with the big mouths would be the first to call the cops and play the victims if anything were to go down. Stupid teenagers are the worst, because they know they are protected by the law and the shit ass parents. If that drag queen had done something you know the mom and kid would be right on CNN the next day talking about how the child was on his way to play his violin at the old folks home when he was brutally attacked for no reason by a drag queen.

    Although I don’t advocate violence, maybe if some jerks knew they might get their teeth knocked out or shot, things might be a little different.

  16. Derrick from Philly says

    MATTY, if “gay” is not about accepting the diversity that up until the 1990s had always been part of the gay world, then fuck “gay” (or atleast bigoted gay men).

    MARC, “boys” have thrown bottles at feminine males(in or out of drag) and left scars on our faces that we have to live with for the rest of our lives.

    Nobody is telling any gay man to socialize with drag queens or fem queens. Just be careful what bigoted comments you let come out of your mouth, or you will get “read” for not being as masculine as you think are. Then y’all get evil. That is a queen’s number defense mechanism within the gay world. And it works.

    If a feminine male can tell that you are gay before we meet you, or before we see you in a gay venue, how the hell do you think we were able to “clock” you for being gay? Obviously, many “mainstream” gay guys aren’t as “butch” as they think they are.

    I wish I had the capacity to forgive like my “Sis” (THE QUEEN) on the west coast. You, darlin’, are so much more simpatico–no wonder you got a husband, and all I got is Brian Pumper dvds.

  17. tenspoonsofspin says

    I love the “a faggot is a pile of sticks”! He/She is right. What mystifies me the most is the kid was smart enough to run into a store where there were other people and then the adults just stood there! There’s an adult drag queen chasing and cursing out a little kid and nobody did a thing! All’s well that ends well. The kid has a story that he will dine out on for years and years and the drag queen stood up for himself/herself in the best possible way.

  18. abracadaver says

    Shameful. Disgraceful. Loud obscenities and language not fit for any kind of public discourse, delivered by men who because of their actions will become de facto representations of gay men simply because they’re loud, crass, and ignorant. A previous poster put it best; how brave is it to chase down pre-adolescent children or engage old men in vulgar discourse?

    Does anyone really think this kind of behavior benefits our community? If so, then I have a suggestion for you: (1) band together and form an “all-gay” ghetto where you will neither be subject to slurs or violence (did anyone notice the absence of physical threats by the old man and kid? Yeah, you were under so much attack, you just HAD to “defend” yourself) and then will no longer need to be self-appointed poster children for the rest of us in the gay community. We don’t need your loud, ill-made up mouths to speak for US, by default or otherwise. Me and my suburban, sweater-wearing, cocktail-drinking buddies will continue to spend our time in productive activities like volunteering in non-profit organizations that expose str8 folk to gays through community service, or donating the money we raise at gallery crawls to worthy gay causes.

    And Derrick, why don’t you just come out and admit that you’ll take the side of whomever you see as being “oppressed,” whether its accurate or not. Maybe you need to talk a look at what it is about victims and being a victim that you find so attractive.

  19. banjiboi says

    I grew up in Village during the late 70’s and I can personally tell you it was the drag queens and not the “boiz” that would put a serious hurting on your ass with a quickness if you came forth “the wrong way”!

    I can hardly count the times I heard the line, “Bitch, don’t try me! I just had my shot of ‘mones and I will turn your mothafukin’ ass out!”.

    The girls HAD to be tough in order to “work” to make their “coins” and not get beat down every night.

    And ain’t a damn thang changed.

  20. says

    Abracadaver’s comment illustrates some of the issues we have in our community… now that it’s easier to come out and stay out (at least easier than it was 50 years ago), the more conservative or “mainstream” gays often feel threatened or embarrassed by those who don’t fit that mold. I don’t think it’s as much a race thing as it is a generalized discomfort with those whose priorities and social behaviors reveal a different socioeconomic status than what we’re familiar with.

    That queen’s behavior wouldn’t fly here in Madison, Wisconsin… but in her own neighborhood it might not be so outrageous or out of place. And she’s not much more outspoken than her female cohorts.

    She’s not speaking for the gay community. The only people who would think that would be people who would be hostile toward us no matter WHAT image we presented to them. Give the queens a break, and just a little bit of respect for being authentically themeselves in a world that most certainly punishes them for it.

  21. banjiboi says

    Hmmmmm. I sense a difference not only of opinion, but most importantly, of perspective.

    Not everybody’s experience in the gay community is filled with nice, quiet tea parties on Saturday ‘afts followed by a quaint Sunday brunch to discuss fund raising with the “girls”. And as for fund raising, there are homeless gay teen of all races and backgrounds living on the streets at the mercy of the police, fag bashers OF ALL AGES, and I do refer to little cretin in the video. Verbal homophobia can be just as hurtful and damaging as physical violence. And some of us here in the city DO spend quite a bit of time doing outreach on the front lines at places like the GMHC and The Osborne Association, helping those with HIV cope with homelessness, addiction, abuse, and incarceration. NOT throwing “Smart” cocktail party/fundraisers to absolve some bourgeois suburban straight’s liberal guilt or otherwise. appetite for No, the kid in the video didn’t deserve to be harmed physically and I’m sure you noticed the queen, although she made some poor choices, didn’t at any time threaten the kid with such. At worst, she engaged the little monster far longer than she should have.

    Please do not forget that if it wasn’t for those loud, obnoxious drag queens, there would not have been a Stonewall.

  22. banjiboi says

    Hmmmmm. I sense a difference not only of opinion, but most importantly, of perspective.

    Not everybody’s experience in the gay community is filled with nice, quiet tea parties on Saturday ‘afts followed by a quaint Sunday brunch to discuss fund raising with the “girls”. And as for fund raising, there are homeless gay teen of all races and backgrounds living on the streets at the mercy of the police, fag bashers OF ALL AGES, and I do refer to little cretin in the video. Verbal homophobia can be just as hurtful and damaging as physical violence. And some of us here in the city DO spend quite a bit of time doing outreach on the front lines at places like the GMHC and The Osborne Association, helping those with HIV cope with homelessness, addiction, abuse, and incarceration. NOT throwing “Smart” cocktail party/fundraisers to absolve some bourgeois suburban straight’s liberal guilt or otherwise. appetite for No, the kid in the video didn’t deserve to be harmed physically and I’m sure you noticed the queen, although she made some poor choices, didn’t at any time threaten the kid with such. At worst, she engaged the little monster far longer than she should have.

    Please do not forget that if it wasn’t for those loud, obnoxious drag queens, there would not have been a Stonewall.

  23. abracadaver says

    I take exception with Milkman’s assertion that the only people who would see these men as representative of the gay community are those who would be hostile to us, no matter what. I volunteer for a very worthwhile organization, GLENDA (Gay and Lesbian Neighborhood Development Association). Our motto is “Promoting Diversity Through Community Service.” We partner with other non-profit, primarily “str8″ organizations with the mission of not only improving the community at large for all people, but to raise the awareness of others who may not normally interact with LGBT folk.

    I can’t tell you through my years of experience I’ve been told, “Wow, I thought all gay guys were loud-mouthed drag queens” or “Gee, I thought all gay guys cruised public toilets and were generally disease ridden,” or even “Gosh, I didn’t realize lesbians could be so pretty!”

    People’s minds can be changed, for better or worse, good or ill. And I stand firm in my contention that the kind of behavior exhibited by the men in this video does our community absolutely no good, and actually promotes hatred and violence against LGBT people. Wear a dress all you want; I not only don’t care but applaud your individuality. But chasing down children and threatening old men is simply antisocial, inappropriate, and dare I say it, twistedly neurotic. Go to therapy “girls,” you’ll be doing yourselves and the rest of us a huge favor.

  24. abracadaver says

    And P.S. — I wasn’t raised in suburbia, having quaint “tea parties.” I worked my way there, against no small odds. I have been the victim of anti-gay violence and discrimination. My experience is no different, no less valid, and certainly no more “insulated” than yours.

  25. banjiboi says

    ABRACADAVER:

    Oh, cry me a river.

    If anything, having gone through what you have, one would think you’d have more compassion and understanding for those gays who do not have the opportunities which you enjoy right now. And I find your charity claims to be quite disingenuous, citing your obvious lack of concern for those who weren’t fortunate enough to escape to WhitePicketFenceLand

  26. Derrick from Philly says

    ABRACADAVER:

    How do you think feminine gay boys go from being meek, timid and passive pre-pubuscents to firey, loud, defensive queens?
    Often gay boys in highschool can be the worst enemies of feminine gay boys, “Look at that faggot” “Why does he have to be so obvious, I’m not like that.”

    Yeah, like I said, I wish I could be forgiving, and let go those bad memories caused by “mainstream” gay highschool classmates, but there are a lot of gay men who I just don’t like and never will–and they tend to be the gay men who believe that “normalcy” will make “gay” more acceptable to our society. Man, where the drag queens live…all the “normalcy” in the world aint gonna’ get a homo accepted.

    Don’t get me wrong, I admire many “traditionally masculine” gay men. But if they are secure in their masculinity, they don’t feel a need to “put down” us sissies and drag queens. And you DON’T have to worry about us trying to mess with your gay dingdongs either. We tend to like rough trade…not violent, just rough–like that Beckham boy.

  27. abracadaver' says

    My compassion is reserved for those who, like me (and I assume, like you) came from disadvantage and refused to let it beat them. My understanding is reserved for those with true bravery, the kind that doesn’t lament a lack of opportunity, or worse, expect it to be handed to them, but go out and make their own opportunities. You’ll notice that if you read my posts carefully that I’m not “crying” for anyone, including myself. I’m pointing out, and will continue to point, and will refuse to be silenced by apologists like yourself, that the only way to change the world is to get off of your dead a*s, up on your dying feet, and BECOME the change that you want to see in the world. If you want tolerance and respect, give tolerance and respect. If you want opportunity, create it. If you want to live your life as a demoralized, angry, maladjusted malcontent, then accept and embrace your choice and quit blaming others.

  28. Derrick from Philly says

    Wow, I really f—-ked up “prepubescent” LOL sorry. Bethca’ most drag queens can spell better than MOI.

    Hell, JIMMYBOYO can spell better than me. Hope you had a great birthday celebration last Sunday, JIMMY.

  29. abracadaver says

    DERRICK:

    What is it about refraining from vulgarity and threats of physical violence (“Lil mutha fuckah, I’ll beat yo AZZ!!!) and engaging in civil discourse (the “a faggot is a bundle of sticks” comment is the one example this disturbed man actually posited), and refusing to be a victim by making yourself more of a victim, that qualifies as “normalcy”? Sorry you were excluded in your youth. So was I. I was “too smart, too pretty and too ‘artsy’ to be anythign but a fag” as my classmates so delicately put it. Now its time for you to cry me a river. Get over it, we’re grown men. The only destiny or fate in this world is that which you create for yourself.

    Contrary to popular belief, experiences don’t shape our outlook; our outlook shapes our experiences. You will see and experience exactly what you expect to in this world. Your comment that you “never will” like us “normal” gay men proves that point.

  30. banjiboi says

    @ ABRACADAVER

    Ohhhh. I get it now. You must live in a log cabin in WhitePicketFenceLand….

    I see no reason to engage you further. Your tiny mind is set. However, I will leave you with this: I find it rather ironic that you live in an environment which at times fosters the most vicious, and heinous types of homophobia. Verbal and otherwise. I should hope that you will not experience anything so unfortunate.

    Have A Lovely Day.

  31. Derrick from Philly says

    Like I said, gay men can a feminine gay males worst enemies. You did speak one truth, ABRACADAVER: that I don’t expect any better…from gay or straight men.

  32. abracadaver says

    BANJI:

    You have no idea where I live. You have no idea what my political affiliaton is. You have no idea what kind of environment I come from, nor what kind of environment I now inhabit. If putting my faith in the tradtional values of hard work, personal responsibility, and an insistence upon civility and decency being the reference point of our society qualifies me as having a “tiny mind,” then so be it. The slings and arrows you resort to because you don’t know how to intelligently counter my position with your own does not define me. If I allowed every person who tried to stop me from doing and saying exactly what I think is right to succeed, I wouldn’t be where I am today. And where that is is somewhere very far from where I came from.

    I hope you make it out of your self-imposed prison one day and join the rest of us in building a better world instead of demanding apologies and sympathies from a nameless, faceless group “out there” who are hellbent on “keeping you down.” The day that you no longer need to define yourself in relation to those who would verbally or physically abuse you, or allow their behavior to justify and condone disgusting behavior such as that exhibited by the men in the video we were (originally) discussing, is the day that the world gains one more person willing to stand up and be change instead of waiting and whining for it to happen.

  33. abracadaver says

    DERRICK: I’m genuinely saddened that you feel the way you do, about gay and straight men. You’re either a very sensitive soul, had some really gruesome experiences rooted primarily in misogyny, or both. Either way, if I could somehow help you see past it and move “into the light,” so to speak, I hope you know that I would.

  34. banjiboi says

    ABRA

    I believe I did counter your position in an intelligent manner, bitchiness aside. Sorry, but I tend to get that way some time. As for the assumptions about your political position and environment, based on my experiences with people and by reading your comments, that’s what you sound like to me. That’s my opinion. And nothing you said before or after has convinced me otherwise.

    And furthermore, my main issue with your statements was that you they seemed to lack COMPASSION despite your claims to be a charitable person, and your blatant clutching of the proverbial pearls. Perhaps that struck a chord. I said nothing about you “keeping me down”. Please, don’t flatter yourself. As for my “self-imposed prison” that is your opinion. I also never demanded that you apologize for anything. Unless you’d like to for some reason. Your beliefs and values are very valid. I just happen to disagree with them.

    I hope that clarifies things a bit.

  35. Derrick from Philly says

    Hey, KENO:

    I agree 120% with BANJIBOI… and about 35% with ABRACADAVER (his sincerity is what I respect– wanting people to overcome rough beginings and not giving into victimhood–that’s the part I believe ABRACADAVER is sincere about).

    Still, for me it’s 120% for BANJIBOI to 35% for ABRACADAVER–we’ll fight it out in Pennsylvania with the drag queen vote.

  36. abracadaver says

    Wow. Just when I think I’m a good speaker, someone says something that causes me to question my ability to clearly posit a statement.

    I’ve reread my previous post and can’t see where I suggested that I, personally, was “keeping you down.” (For the record, I don’t need to flatter myself…other men do it for me. LOL) I’m also not sure where it says that I feel you are asking for an apology from me, personally. Allow me a moment to set the record straight and say that it was not my intention. Perhaps your reading comprehension needs a bit of exercise.

    That being said, in response to your statement, “…[b]ased on my experiences with people and by reading your comments, that’s what you sound like to me. That’s my opinion. And nothing you said before or after has convinced me otherwise”, I reiterate the following statement that I made earlier; not because I wish to be redundant, but because its important and its been my experience that most people just don’t “get it” the first time:

    “Contrary to popular belief, experiences don’t shape our outlook; our outlook shapes our experiences. You will see and experience exactly what you expect to in this world.”

    That’s all.

  37. abracadaver says

    Darn, now I feel that I’m just being verbose, but I really do need to say just one more thing.

    BANJI and I obviously have different ideas of what compassion is. An example: most people see a homeless man begging for money and, out of “compassion,” give what they can. When I see a homeless man, I give him a bus ticket and pre-printed directions to local homeless shelters that I carry in my pocket at all times. Knowing what I do of the plight of the homeless, I know that most would spend any money collected on drugs or alcohol, not food or housing. By giving a homeless person money, one is not being compassionate, they are enabling addiction and the cycle of homelessness.

    If I don’t sound like a compassionate person to you, perhaps you should rethink what compassion really is. To me, its helping others stand on their own two feet, not carrying them on your back.

  38. abracadaver says

    Irrelevant. I wouldn’t want my positions to even be considered by someone who bases theirs (knee-jerk reactions?) exclusively on membership in any particular group or geography, perceived or actual.

  39. banjiboi says

    ABRA

    First of all, I don’t want to negate any of the positive things you might do to help others. I don’t think it’s appropriate to get into a pissing contest over the level of one’s commitment to charitable causes. It’s rather gauche really, and it discourages others and sullies the very idea of giving. Regretfully, I crossed that line.

    I do, however take offense when I detect any note of moral superiority when it comes to these matters. I got that sense from your comments. If you feel that I’m mistaken, I can accept that and simply agree to disagree, and live and let live.

    We are all in this together to some degree, regardless of our differences in opinion, right?

    Olive branch?

  40. banjiboi says

    ABRA

    First of all, I don’t want to negate any of the positive things you might do to help others. I don’t think it’s appropriate to get into a pissing contest over the level of one’s commitment to charitable causes. It’s rather gauche really, and it discourages others and sullies the very idea of giving. Regretfully, I crossed that line.

    I do, however take offense when I detect any note of moral superiority when it comes to these matters. I got that sense from your comments. If you feel that I’m mistaken, I can accept that and simply agree to disagree, and live and let live.

    We are all in this together to some degree, regardless of our differences in opinion, right?

    Olive branch?

  41. abracadaver says

    Thanks for your post, BANJI. No olive branch is necessary; you must understand (and perhaps forgive) that I make my living in the law, and debate comes naturally to me. What others consider to be bickering or arguing, I see as healthy and the free exchange of ideas. Unless, of course, it devolves into name-calling or pithy put-downs, at which point the exercise is pointless.

    Thanks for engaging me this afternoon. Its been a pleasure.

  42. banjiboi says

    ABRA

    I know what you mean about engaging in debate! I am a former wild child from the streets who’s never backed down from a challenge, so I can sort of identify with you. And I most certainly can identify with the subjects of this post!

    signing off.

  43. Marc says

    Hey listen up, these queens can scream and yell and taunt and cuss back as much as they want.

    I do not have to like or respect it. That is my right.

    I was one of those meek teens that was taunted everyday too. So I can understand the anger I suppose?
    It seems like a bit over-the-top for a fat man sitting hurling slurs and a 12 year old.

    For christ’s sake, if it was me i wouldn’t have any time in my day for either of them.

    I side with the queens of course, but I do feel embarassed by it still and think it’s waaaaaaaaaay outta hand.

    So? Don’t let my opinion piss you off, yours didn’t piss me off.
    M.

  44. Bobby says

    UNTIL HOMOPHOBIA WITHIN OUR COMMUNITY STOPS WE CAN’T EXPECT IT TO STOP OUTSIDE OUR COMMUNITY.

    Accept your gay brothers and sisters and your brothers who are sisters and your sisters who are brothers. It’s our diversity that makes us amazing, unstoppable and beautiful.

  45. nic says

    i have watched vids and read stories about 2 or 3 gay men being hassled or brutalized by ONE straight sociopathic male. why is that? meanwhile, these queens fought back and they proved their titles and earned my respect.

    as much as i hate confrontation, no straight asshole is going to make me cower. if gay men refuse to fight back in the face of humiliation and brutality, then they deserve what they get. there is a time for negotiation, and there is a time for baseball bats.

  46. dw314 says

    HEH HEH! I have often said you don’t want to fuck with drag queens. They have to deal with abuse everytime they walk out the door. if they don’t defend themselves who will? Personally I’d rather cheer on a pissed off queen than sit around listening to some Abercrombie and Fitch wearing Weho/Chelsea fag talk about how it reflects badly on “normal” gay men. Oh brother, why don’t you just take off your shirts, drop some G and go on with your adopted black baby, circuit party fraud of a lifestyle. At least these crazy bitches are being true to themselves. I think that all that wacked out makeup at least shows some artistic creativity. It’s not a Kelly Clarkson remix but it is art. And the one with the mace looks better than 70% of the girls the average straight guy will ever get.

    As a gay black man I have been on the shitty end of the uptight gay stick many times. I have watched as my whitewashed brothers avoided talking to me because they were afraid their gymbros would notice they were black (and I’m a light skinned well spoken black man). I see the same thing here from people who are shocked and appalled at this behavior. Well, get gay bashed one night and see if you don’t wish either of the embarrasments was there to help you.

    One more thing, in regards to foul language etc., ARE YOU FUCKING KIDDING ME? You don’ try to reason with someone fucking with you on public transportation in some “now look here fella” talk! You tell that muthafucka that you are about to kick his shit up his nose! When you see a bobcat out on a trail (I’m going to assume you’re “hiking” not doing that bush diving you uptight types do while your boyfriend is at home on manhunt) you don’t say “nice kitty”. You stand up big and make threatening noises and let pussy galore know who is in charge. Otherwise you’re on the news with your boyfriend wondering what you were doing in the park when you were supposed to be at Target.

    Bitch Please.

  47. says

    It’s the classic case of the Challengers vs the Bargainers.

    It’s common among oppressed groups and activist communities. Think Greenpeace vs Sierra Club; ACT UP vs HRC; Black Panthers vs NAACP.

    Both are useful and effective strategies, up to a point. Neither will ever be completely successful on its own, and, unfortunately, each distrusts and often undermines the other.

    If Abracadaver is OK with being a petting-zoo curiosity in order to expose sheltered straights to a “normal” gay person, that’s a worthwhile thing for him to do.

    If a drag queen (or a leather bear, or a big ol’ dyke, or whoever) wants to tell off a bigot, that’s worthwhile too.

    Me, I’m a pretty “normal” person, whatever that is. Some people can tell right away that I’m gay, but then sometimes I get hit on by straight girls. Usually it doesn’t come up at all in casual, public situations. I’m lucky to live in a very liberal city.

    But I *will not* be called a fag by anyone who uses the word in a hateful way. Even kids who don’t necessarily use it to mean that they think I’m actually homosexual but just use it because it’s the worst insult they know — I absolutely will not tolerate being treated that way. Sometimes I’m able to deal with it calmly, sometimes I yell back. Different situations call for different tactics, and I won’t feel sorry about it later either way.

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