Comments

  1. jomicur says

    It hardly makes any difference. Both parties’ platforms are PR documents, nothing more. They are not binding on the candidates in any way, either during the campaign or once they’re in office. It would be a very nice gesture, but no more than that.

  2. BABH says

    “Who makes the decision on putting this in the democratic platform? Is this is voted on? If so who votes on it?”

    In a presidential election year, the decision is made by the National Convention. The delegates to the National Convention all have a vote on the platform. They consist of these folks:
    http://2012.democratic-convention.org/Delegates.php

    If you want to run for election as a convention delegate someday, get involved with your local Democratic Party.

  3. Michelle says

    Our Los Angeles Mayor, Villaraigosa is a major supporter of equal rights. We need to thank him for that. I had the opportunity to personally tell him a few kinds words for being supportive of us and he told me that it meant a lot to him. He said it means a great deal to have LGBT couples and people approach him and say that because it shows his work is making a difference. ALWAYS be sure to thank our allies…whether it’s an email or kindly in person. It makes a huge impression.

  4. MFinBH says

    Sorry, but our mayor is perhaps the worst possible spokesman on the subject of marriage, unless he is simply a model of why straight men have no business legislating anyone else’s marriage (having made such a public botch of his own)!

  5. sugarrhill says

    When are some Gays goign to get it through their thick skulls that marriage equlity isn’t about perfect unions but about equality? So what Villaragosa didn’t have a perfect union? Marriage equality is about access to the same rights afford to our straight counterparts.

  6. just_a_guy says

    Bravo. The Democrats will win on/with this issue. It might not be right away, but it is the only way a truly sane, informed politician can come down on this issue with good faith.

  7. jack says

    I think it is bad strategy. The democrats already have the support of those who favor full equality for LGBT folks. However, there are many centrists who haven’t yet come around to support the idea of gay marriage. Don’t push them too far, too fast. It might just cause them to turn to the right. The most important thing in 2012 is to hold the White House, increase the number of dems in the Senate and retake the House. After that lots of progress can be made. Lose the White House and we are in for a long dry spell. This advice comes from a guy who contributed to and voted for Pres McGovern. Remember him? Of course not. The great majority of Americans saw him and his platform as way to liberal and voted Republica.

  8. MFINBH says

    @Sugarrhill: To be clear,this gay hasn’t got a thick skull, but rather recognizes that the political calculus is bad. The right will shred him as a bad example of a marriage proponent. Everyone here in L.A. knows he’s always been pro-LGBT rights, but on the national stage,his marital history will be used against him, and by proxy,against his position on this issue.

    His scandal was nightly news for a year in L.A., and it is precisely why he withdrew his gubernatorial run. He could better help by working for ENDA and leaving DOMA repeal to someone else. It’s politics.

Leave A Reply