Best gay blog. Towleroad Wins Award

Ohio Hub



04/19/2007


Ohio University Student Charged In Snapchat Sex Extortion Case

Ohiouniversity

An Ohio University student, Dorian Graham, has been charged in a case involving Snapchat and Instagram as a means for sexual extortion. Graham, according to a report from WOWK-TV, pretended to be a female in order to encourage a male student to send naked photos via Snapchat; afterward Graham posted the photos on Instagram for others to see. Graham then extorted the other male student to engage in sexual activity at the school's Athens, OH campus by refusing to take the photos off of Instagram unless he complied with Graham's demands. 

It is truly a case for the technological age, and one which sees Graham facing several felony charges, including extortion and sexual battery. 


Idaho Professor Believes State's Anti-Gay Marriage Laws Could Easily Be Overturned, Cites Ohio And Utah

DavidAdlerIn an opinion piece for the Idaho Statesmen, Boise State University public affairs professor David Adler (right) stressed the precedent-setting Utah and Ohio decisions regarding same-sex marriage as indications that Idaho's own anti-gay marriage laws could easily be struck down. The two cases marked the first time federal judges ruled on the same-sex marriage laws of specific states after the take-down of DOMA, and they are indicative of the growing de-legitimization of laws barring marriage, or its recognition in other states. If Adler's predictions are accurate, Idaho, which recently had a lawsuit filed in the federal court, could see gay marriage legalized sooner than expected. 

The Idaho Statesmen reports:

Judge Robert J. Shelby’s decision in the Utah case, which has a direct bearing on the Idaho Constitution, was significant to the national drive for same-sex marriage. It represents the first time a federal court has ruled on the constitutionality of state bans on gay marriage since the Supreme Court struck down DOMA. Judge Shelby held that state laws barring same-sex marriage violate the due process clause and the equal protection guarantees of the 14th Amendment.

The opinion in the Ohio case, delivered by Judge Timothy Black, is precedent-setting and speaks to Idaho law. While the ruling applies only to death certificates, Judge Black’s determination that “once you get married lawfully in one state, another state cannot summarily take your marriage away,” represents a stark challenge to Idaho’s refusal to recognize the lawful marriages of same-sex couples in other states.

Utah and Ohio will appeal these rulings, but their legal rationales for banning gay marriage, like Idaho’s, have lost their force in light of the landmark opinion in Windsor. Idaho’s exclusion of same-sex couples from marriage and its refusal to respect existing marriages undermines same-sex couples’ ability to pursue their goals and dreams, disadvantages them financially and denies what Kennedy called the “dignity and status of immense import.” 

Adler believes that Idaho's laws will not survive any scrutiny because they only serve to limit the rights of a minority and set them apart from the rest of the general public (rather than aiding any kind of governmental interest).


John Arthur, Terminally-Ill Man Who Challenged Ohio's Gay Marriage Ban, Has Died at 48

Arthur

John Arthur, who in July flew to Maryland with his partner of 20 years, Jim Obergfell, so that they could marry on the airport tarmac before Arthur's ALS, a progressive neurological disease that robs patients of their ability to walk, talk and eventually breathe, became too difficult, has died, Cincinatti.com reports.

Mr. Arthur was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in 2011, and his terminal illness played a prominent role in the couple’s decision to marry and in the ensuing legal battle. He and Obergefell had been a couple since 1992 but decided to marry after the U.S. Supreme Court’s June 26 decision striking down portions of the federal Defense of Marriage Act.

Following their marriage, they decided to file a lawsuit challenging Ohio's same-sex marriage ban.

A few days after their wedding the couple were contacted by civil-rights attorney Al Gerhardstein, who had been working on challenges to Ohio’s marriage ban. Several days later they filed a lawsuit in federal court in Cincinnati against the state and the city of Cincinnati, claiming that failure to recognize their marriage violated the equal protection clause of the U.S. Constitution, because Ohio recognized other marriages performed outside the state that Ohio itself banned, such as marriages between first cousins or minors.

Mr. Arthur’s terminal illness allowed the case to move more quickly through the court. It also allowed Gerhardstein to argue that the couple would face “irreparable harm” if Mr. Arthur was listed as single on his death certificate. Additionally, Mr. Arthur’s family plot at Spring Grove Cemetery is limited to direct descendants and their spouses, so the question of recognizing their marriage also was likely to influence where he was buried and whether his partner could someday be buried next to him.

In July, Federal Judge Timothy Black issued a temporary order requiring that Arthur be listed as married on his death certificate and Obergefell be named his surviving spouse.

Arthur was 48 years old. Our thoughts go out to Jim Obergfell, and their friends and family, and we thank Arthur for his courage.

Watch the inspiring story of their wedding (autoplay), AFTER THE JUMP...

Continue reading "John Arthur, Terminally-Ill Man Who Challenged Ohio's Gay Marriage Ban, Has Died at 48" »


Ohio Lawmaker Plans Bill to Ban Gay 'Conversion Therapy' for Minors

A Democratic lawmaker in Ohio says she plans to follow California and New Jersey and ban conversion therapy for minors, the Dispatch reports:

Tavares“If they are already questioning their sexuality, we don’t want them to think there is something wrong with them that needs to be fixed,” Sen. Charleta Tavares said.

California banned sexual-orientation therapy last year for anyone younger than 18. In August, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, a Republican, signed a similar law. Tavares said her bill more closely mirrors the New Jersey law, leaving penalties up to professional licensing boards.

She said it is an issue that she and her Democratic colleagues thought they needed to be more proactive in addressing, noting the higher rates of suicide among gays. She said she does not know whether so-called conversion therapy is used much in Ohio, but she said that even if it’s rare, the bill still sends a message.

“We don’t want to do any harm to a child,” she said.

A similar bill has also been introduced in Pennsylvania by gay Rep. Brian Sims.


Ohio Gay Marriage Lawsuit Expanded to Include All Similarly Situated Couples

Arthur

Federal Judge Timothy Black, who is facing the threat of impeachment from conservative Republican lawmakers in Ohio, yesterday expanded a lawsuit challenging Ohio's ban on same-sex marriage, the AP reports:

A lawsuit seeking to have the marriages of two gay couples recognized on death certificates has been expanded to include all similarly situated couples in Ohio, despite a statewide gay marriage ban. Attorneys are asking a federal judge to require Ohio's health department to order all funeral directors and coroners in the state to list gay clients as married if they were legally wed in other states. Judge Timothy Black approved a request to expand the lawsuit Wednesday.

John Arthur and Jim Obergefell originally filed the suit after chartering a plane to Maryland where they were married on the airport tarmac. Arthur is terminally-ill with ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease.

Earlier this week, Ohio state Rep. John Becker threatened Black with impeachment for "malfeasance and abuse of power" and is calling on Rep. Brad Wenstrup (R-OH) to start the proceedings.


How Will Cleveland Leverage Hate Crimes and Gay Games to Brand Itself an LGBT-Friendly City? — VIDEO

Nobbe

Leaders in Cleveland's LGBT community talk to the Northwest Ohio Media Group about how recent hate crimes at the city's Cocktails Lounge and the upcoming Gay Games in 2014 are an opportunity to raise awareness about how LGBT are disenfranchised in the state and lift Cleveland's reputation as an LGBT-friendly city.

Watch, AFTER THE JUMP...

Cleveland.com adds:

The Diversity Center of Northeast Ohio has developed a four-hour training to give to businesses that wish to be a sponsor of the games or a certified vendor.

Peggy Zone Fisher, the group's president and CEO, said the training would examine companies' policies and procedures and rate them on how LGBT friendly the business is.

"We're not going to rewrite their handbook," she said.

Fisher, pointing out that it's not against the law in Ohio for employers to fire employees for being gay, said the training is a way to use the Gay Games as a spring board to make Cleveland more LGBT friendly long term.

"The sustainability piece of this training is going to be getting those protections in place in the policies and procedures of the companies," she said.

Public attention to the hate crimes has also brought light to what LGBT leaders see as another omission in the law - one that Ohio Rep. Nickie Antonio plans to address.

Continue reading "How Will Cleveland Leverage Hate Crimes and Gay Games to Brand Itself an LGBT-Friendly City? — VIDEO" »


Trending



Towleroad - Blogged