National Organization for Marriage’s Political Advocacy Arm Ended 2012 With a $2.7 Million Deficit

GallagherYesterday, we reported that the Human Rights Campaign had filed a complaint with the IRS to compel the National Organization for Marriage to publicly release financial documents related to its political advocacy spending in 2012. With the reports now published and viewable on their site as a result of the complaint, it appears NOM may have been hiding the information because of the revelation that the organization found itself more than $2.7 million in the red as a result of its political advocacy arm's spending. You'll recall 2012 being a disappointing year for gay marriage opponents, with pro-equality victories in four of the five same-sex marriage ballot measures by year's end. Buzzfeed breaks down more of the reports' findings:

The organization raised nearly $14.5 million in contributions, with the bulk of it – more than $9.4 million – going to the political advocacy arm. The advocacy arm also reported receiving more than $1.6 million in reimbursement of expenses.

Although the names of the donors are redacted, the largest donor to NOM was a person who gave the organization's political advocacy arm more than $2.6 million. Another donor gave $1.9 million to the political advocacy arm, while a third game $1.5 million.

The second largest donor to the organization gave $2 million to the educational arm, while another gave a little more than $1 million. 

The political advocacy arm – a 501(c)(4) organization – reported more than $13 million in expenses, with the education arm – a 501(c)(3) organization – reporting a little less than $3.5 million in expenses.

The organization contributed more than $1 million to the ballot referendum campaigns in Maryland and Washington, as well as to the campaign for a marriage amendment in Minnesota. The organization gave more than $1 million to the "NOM ME Fund," presumably its contribution to fighting the Maine marriage equality initiative.

NOM's sole 2012 ballot victory occurred in May, when North Carolina voters approved a constitutional amendment banning gay marriage.