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Theatre News: Mitchell Extends in 'Hedwig,' 'Falsettos' and 'Allegiance' Coming to Broadway

Jcm hedwig

> John Cameron Mitchell has extended his stint as the star of Hedwig and the Angry Inch at the Belasco Theatre through April 26. However, due to a knee injury he sustained during a performance on February 7, the actor, who co-created the musical with Stephen Trask and originated the title role Off Broadway, is taking a weeklong hiatus from the show to recover. Michael C. Hall, who played Hedwig earlier in the production’s run, will return to the role from February 17 through 21, after which Mitchell is expected to return. 

George_takei_0> George Takei will star in the forthcoming Broadway production of Allegiance, a musical about Japanese Americans during World War II inspired by the actor’s own experiences in internment camps. With music and lyrics by Jay Kuo and book by Marc Acito, the musical first premiered in 2012 at the Old Globe Theatre in San Diego under the direction of Stafford Arima. The show is scheduled to begin previews on Broadway in October 2015 with an opening night set for November 8. Arima returns to direct, further casting and the theatre have yet to be announced. 

> A revival of the 1992 musical Falsettos, with music and lyrics by William Finn (The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee) and book by Mr. Finn and James Lapine (Into the Woods) is aiming for Broadway in the spring of 2016, producer Jordan Roth announced last week. A combination of two one-act musicals by Finn originally produced Off Broadway, the show tells the story of a man who leaves his family to be with another man. Lapine will return to direct, as he did the original production, which was nominated for seven Tony Awards and won for Best Book and Best Original Score.

(Mitchell: Joan Marcus)


Theatre News: Anne Hathaway Off-Broadway, Jim Parsons to Play God, and Bradley Cooper in London

Anne-hathaway

> Anne Hathaway and director Julie Taymor are teaming up Off-Broadway at the Public Theater this spring for Grounded, a new play by George Brant. The solo show, which was previously produced in New York by Page 73 Productions and at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival prior to that, is about a pregnant fighter pilot assigned to operate a remote-controlled drone from her suburban home. Previews begin April 7 for an official opening on April 23.

Jim-parsons> Jim Parsons will star as the title character in An Act of God, a new comedy arriving on Broadway this spring at Studio 54, producer Jeffrey Finn announced last week. David Javerbaum, a former head writer and executive producer on The Daily Show With John Stewart, penned the 90-minute satire based on his own 2011 book The Last Testament: A Memoir by God. Directed by Joe Mantello, the show will begin previews May 5 and open on May 28.

> The Heart of Robin Hood, a play by David Farr that was headed for the Marquis Theatre on Broadway next month, will extend its run in Toronto and postpone its arrival in New York, producer David Mirvish revealed last week. Billed as an imaginative and acrobatic retelling of the classic Robin Hood story with original music performed by Parsonsfield, the show is directed by Gísli Örn Gardarsson’s and was previously staged at the American Repertory Theatre. Future Broadway plans have not been announced.

Bradley cooper

> The current Broadway revival of The Elephant Man starring Bradley Cooper, Patricia Clarkson and Alessandro Nivola, will transfer to London’s Theatre Royal Haymarket to begin performances on May 19, producer James L. Nederlander announced last week. Directed by Scott Ellis, the revival will continue its limited engagement at the Booth Theatre through February 21, where it has broken box office records since opening this fall.


Tony Danza Opens in ‘Honeymoon in Vegas’ on Broadway: REVIEW

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BY NAVEEN KUMAR

Honeymoon in Vegas, a new musical comedy that opened on Broadway January 15 at the Nederlander Theatre, feels much like an extended trip to its title city: fun, shameless and even a bit thrilling at first, but by mid-stay you may find yourself feeling restless, tinged with regret and just a little bit used.

Honeymoon1Based on the 1992 film starring Nicholas Cage and Sarah Jessica Parker, the musical was written for the stage by the movie’s writer and director Andrew Bergman (also known for comedy classics Blazing Saddles and Soapdish), with a characteristically clever and lovely score by Jason Robert Brown (The Bridges of Madison County and The Last Five Years).

By turns dirty and family friendly, the show tells the story of everyman Jack (Rob McClure) and his girlfriend Betsy (Brynn O’Malley), who has all her ducks in a row but no ring on her finger. Standing between them and the altar is Jack’s dead mom, Bea (Nancy Opel), who forced a deathbed promise on her son: that he’d never wed, because no one could ever love him as much as she does. Despite the curse, Jack bites the bullet and flies Betsy from Brooklyn to Sin City to get hitched. Mayhem ensues when Vegas vet and high roller Tommy (Tony Danza) eyes Betsy and hatches a plan to snatch her away (she’s a ringer for his dead wife).

Honeymoon3The musical’s ‘90s-New York brand of comedy works in its favor (off-beat yet on the nose), particularly in Brown’s playful lyrics (what rhymes better with fiancé than Jay Z and Beyoncé?). Danza naturally finds himself in his element here, and exudes the comfortable charm that became his small screen signature in shows like Taxi and Who’s the Boss. He has a smooth, mellow croon that does well with softer, Sinatra-like numbers, though he stands on shakier ground when asked to deliver more forceful tunes. McClure (Tony nominated for Chaplin: The Musical) and O’Malley pair well together and make nice work of Brown’s score and the show’s humor.

Anyone who wondered how a woman who looks like Sarah Jessica Parker could wind up torn between Nick Cage and James Caan will perhaps have less to ponder here: We are, by now, well used to male-fantasy narratives in which the schlub ends up with the knockout (plus, Danza’s not looking too shabby and McClure didn’t quite crawl from the gutter, either).

Honeymoon4But unfortunately and to its detriment, Bergman’s stage adaptation is uncomfortably (and bizarrely) heavy on both masculine neuroses and blatant misogyny. The story’s mommy issues are writ large (scaled up significantly from the movie), and its women are either dead nags (like mom), desperate to wed and procreate (Betsy), or else they’re showgirls, airheads or hookers. A tasteless number during the characters’ sojourn in Hawaii finds a hypersexualized, overtly stereotyped Polynesian whore vigorously seducing the schlub on boss’ orders.

Vegas is a town of obvious, low-hanging thrills and sensory pleasures, catered, more often than not, to male desire. Bergman and Brown’s musical has plenty of both, mixed in with moments of broad appeal. But the longer this trip goes on, the more glaring it becomes just whose honeymoon this is—and that he might be in need of a diaper change.

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Follow Naveen Kumar on Twitter: @Mr_NaveenKumar (photos: joan marcus)


Theatre News: JHud to Star in ‘The Color Purple,’ Plus John Cameron Mitchell, Vanessa Hudgens and Chita Rivera on Broadway

Jennifer-hudson

> Jennifer Hudson will make her Broadway debut in The Color Purple this fall, producers announced this week. Based on Alice Walker’s novel of the same name, the musical, with book by Marsha Norman, music and lyrics by Brenda Russell, Allee Willis and Stephen Bray, originally premiered on Broadway in 2005 and ran for over two years. The new, pared-down revival directed by John Doyle transfers after a critically acclaimed run at London’s Menier Chocolate Factory in 2013, and will be produced on Broadway by the show’s original team of Scott Sanders, Roy Furman and Oprah Winfrey.

JCM2> John Cameron Mitchell begins his eight-week run as Hedwig in Hedwig and the Angry Inch on Broadway at the Belasco Theatre on January 21. Mitchell, who penned the musical with Stephen Trask, created the title role Off Broadway in 1998 and starred the cult-favorite 2001 film, which he also adapted and directed. Check out our in-depth conversation with Mitchell about returning to the role of Hedwig here.

> Idina Menzel’s star-vehicle musical If/Then has announced a closing date of March 22 at the Richard Rodgers Theatre. Produced by David Stone (Wicked), directed by Michael Greif (Grey Gardens, Next to Normal), with music by Tom Kitt and book and lyrics by Brian Yorkey (Pulitzer winners for Next to Normal), the show opened last march and will have run for just over a year on Broadway.

Vanessa-hudgens-768> The Broadway-bound revival of Gigi, starring Vanessa Hudgens in the title role, will land at the Neil Simon theatre for previews beginning March 19 and an opening night of April 8, producers announced this week. Last seen on Broadway in 1974, the musical, with book and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner and music by Frederick Loewe, is adapted from the 1958 movie of the same name and based on the 1994 novella by Colette. The new production directed by Eric Schaeffer features a revised book adaptation by Heidi Thomas and is currently in performances at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C.

> Two-time Tony Award winner Chita Rivera will return to Broadway in The Visit, a musical by songwriters John Kander and Fred Ebb (Cabaret, Chicago) with book by Terrence McNally, at the Lyceum Theatre this spring. The musical, which was previously produced at the Goodman Theatre in Chicago in 2001 and Williamstown Theatre Festival last summer, will also be directed by John Doyle (Sweeney Todd, Company). Previews for the musical based on the satirical play by Friedrich Dürrenmatt as adapted by Maurice Valency begin March 26 for an opening night of April 23; Tony winner Roger Rees co-stars.

(Hudson: Anthony Mandler Courtesy of RCA, Hudgens: Matthew Murphy via People)


Jake Gyllenhaal and Ruth Wilson Open in ‘Constellations’ on Broadway: REVIEW

Con1

BY NAVEEN KUMAR

If you’re short on reasons to love Ruth Wilson (Golden Globe winner for The Affair) or Jake Gyllenhaal (leading man of your dreams since the days of Donnie Darko), their magnetic performances in Nick Payne’s engrossing new play Constellations, which opened on Broadway last night at Manhattan Theatre Club’s Friedman Theatre, prove they’re as formidably talented as they are beautiful, onstage as onscreen. (Yes, it seems some people really can have it all.)

Con2Payne’s drama, which arrives in New York after a critically acclaimed production at London’s Royal Court Theatre and West End transfer in 2012, delivers on its cosmic title—with a love story that is, quite literally, “timeless.” Set in what the program deems “The Multiverse,” the play’s romance unfolds in a world of infinite—or at least multiple—possibilities. The theory Payne explores, which may be familiar to sci-fi fans and wide-eyed physicists alike (Wilson’s character is among the latter), allows for the existence of parallel universes and eschews the notion of linear time. (Don’t worry: The show runs a swift 70 minutes.)  

Con5In this case, that means our two stars (get it?) together on a black stage, surrounded by white orbs (a striking scenic design by Tom Scutt), performing variations on a series of scenes that combine to form a multi-dimensional love story. What if he’d been married when they first met? What if she’d been less withholding on their first date? From minor shifts in mood to more divergent twists in plot, the repeated variations create a sort of rich, imaginative portrait of love in a world of possibilities.   

Under deft direction by Michael Longhurst, Gyllenhaal and Wilson bring fierce yet effortless dedication to every moment, shifting abruptly from one scene to the next with precision and grace. The overall affect is, at first, playful and engaging—the play’s opening line, posed by Wilson’s character: “Do you know why it’s impossible to lick the tips of your elbows?” (They both eventually proceed to try.) And as details of the story gradually become clear, Payne’s play turns increasingly thought provoking and ultimately quite moving.

Con3As Marianne, Wilson (whose London stage credits include starring opposite Rachel Weisz in A Streetcar Named Desire and Jude Law in Anna Christie, both at the Donmar Warehouse) balances goofy charisma with a palpable emotional depth. Gyllenhaal (who made his American stage debut Off Broadway in Payne’s If There Is I Haven’t Found It Yet) brings a more understated, hapless charm to the quieter Roland.

Payne’s play, whose conceptual daring owes much to ground-laying works by Caryl Churchill (Top Girls, A Number), may leave some audiences scratching their heads. But, whether the drama’s metaphysical questions interest you or not, these celestial bodies are well worth stargazing at. 

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Follow Naveen Kumar on Twitter: @Mr_NaveenKumar (photos: joan marcus)


Theatre News: Sienna Miller to Join ‘Cabaret,’ Plus ‘The Last Ship’, ‘Disgraced’ and ‘The Flick’

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> Emma Stone will extend her stint as Sally Bowles in Cabaret at Studio 54 for two additional weeks through February 15, and Sienna Miller will take over the role for the musical’s final six weeks of performances through March 29, Roundabout Theatre Company announced this week. The current Broadway revival starring Alan Cumming, which opened in March 2014, is a remounting of Roundabout’s Tony-winning 1998 production, in which Cumming also starred opposite Natasha Richardson.

Sting> Sting’s musical The Last Ship, about a struggling shipyard on the British coast, will close January 24 at the Neil Simon Theatre, producers announced on Monday. The show, featuring an original score by Sting, book by Tony-winners John Logan (Red) and Brian Yorkey (Next to Normal) and direction by Joe Mantello (Wicked), opened in October to mixed reviews and has struggled to stay afloat. Sting stepped into a featured role for six weeks beginning December 9 in hopes of igniting audience interest in the show. But despite a surge at the box office during his run, a sharp drop-off in advance ticket sales after his scheduled exit prompted the producers’ decision to shutter the new musical after just four months.   

> Ayad Akhtar’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play Disgraced will play its final performance at the Lyceum Theatre on March 1, producers announced this week. Directed by Kimberly Senior and starring Hari Dhillon, Gretchen Mol, Josh Radnor and Karen Pittman, the explosive drama exploring faith, race, art and politics transferred to Broadway in October after an acclaimed run Off Broadway at Lincoln Center in 2012.  

Flick051rSc> Annie Baker’s The Flick, another Pulitzer Prize winner, will come back to the New York stage this spring at the Barrow Street Theatre. Originally produced by Playwrights Horizons in 2013, the play about a hapless trio of indie Cineplex employees returns for a commercial Off-Broadway run produced by Scott Rudin. The original creative team, including the full cast and director Sam Gold will remount the production. 

(photos: Richard Phibbs via Entertainment Weekly, Joan Marcus)


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