Comments

  1. Rich says

    Don’t forget the Katy Perry appearance. Also, they’re smartly producing segments ripe to go viral among adolescents and adults. They’ve simply made themselves relevant again. Good for them.

  2. GregV says

    I think this is really grasping at straws, and there is nothing at all new here.

    Sesame Street has had many gay guest stars playing not-necessarily-gay characters and/or never mentioning anything that would indicate that they were gay in real life (such as Lily Tomlin playing Edith Ann, Rosie O’Donnell, Ellen Degeneres, BD Wong, Melissa Etheridge) right from its earliest days to years before recent gay guests like Wanda Sykes showed up.

    Until Wanda Sykes says, “Hey, Big Bird, my wife sent you a present: a bird seed casserole,” I won’t see anything particularly novel.

    I like Will I Am. But Kermit the Frog sang this amazing song in 1969:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=51BQfPeSK8k

    I ask myself why this song brings a little mist to my eye to this day. I think it touches me because it takes me back to that time when what I understood from Kermit was (to paraphrase(: “When gay is all there is to be, it can make you wonder why, but why wonder why.”

  3. tim says

    is the idea of being nice and having an open heart or mind gay.

    is the idea – the intellectual idea – of play gay

    or is this a children’s show and we as adults need to get over our hangups about what looks “gay”

  4. SKB says

    They are grasping at straws.

    Um,”mo” in the way the tweet was refers to
    a hair style called a mohawk. (sadly most people today only know of the abomination called a Fauxhawk) How do you get from the OBVIOUS reference to the fact that Bert is outing himself?

  5. gregv says

    @SKB: I think Bert was making a double-entendre of “Mo”(hawk) and “Mo” from the Three Stooges (who had a unique, black tuft of hair that only filled in the top half of his head.
    I agree with you; the idea that he meant “(ho)mo” not only is a stretch, but would make no sense at all (does someone out there really think gay men are well known for odd tufts of hair patterned like an inverse of male pattern baldness?)

    The thing that bothers me about articles like this is that it creates a false public perception that TV is doing more than enough to feature gay people’s lives, when in reality, some of the imagined examples are so “coded” that any true, unambiguous gay visibility in those examples is completely nonexistent.

  6. jason says

    Don’t let the LA Times fold you into thinking that Sesame Street is gay-friendly. It isn’t.

    As for Will I Am being gay-friendly, give me a break. The Black Eyed Peas appear to be a sleazy homophobic group. They promoted Fergie as bisexual but the guys as strictly straight. It’s a homophobic double standard if ever there was one.

  7. says

    In South Africa, I’m pretty sure there’s an HIV positive muppet. I don’t necessarily think that being mindful of making children feel they can relate to their show is necessarily negative. *twirl*

  8. Tonic says

    Sesame Street is definitely gay friendly – though what we’re seeing more organic than intentional. One of the show’s lead writers for the past 20-something years is a lesbo and there are many gay puppeteers (or muppeteers), all of who have a gay ol’ time making the show.

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