Comments

  1. sleepy bear says

    i think the rural areas of america are just hypersensitive about glbt issues.

    they see the roaring avalanche of our civil rights coming towards them and they just don’t know how to fight it anymore because we have or are very close to the critical mass of support where it is inevitable we will win.

  2. NightowlBC says

    Sleepy Bear: You are so right. These are the death throws of a group of people in a panic as they see “their way of life” disappearing before their eyes.

  3. says

    This is the best publicity ever, stir up the controversy, people will come just out of curiosity.

    Homophobia runs deep from Spokane through the silver belt of Idaho and on into western Montana.

  4. mcNnyc says

    You NOT? “… promoting or celebrating from an institutional standpoint”!?
    That is BS and a cowardly thing to say mr. Executive artistic director. Jonathan Larson did not give his life to this work to not promoting or celebrating the life of these people.
    Cop out.
    I know you may need to be pc in that part of the woods that might take away your funding but that was a lame statement.
    Coward.

  5. says

    It doesn’t matter what you think of the play . Artistic freedom is the issue. Medical privacy is the issue.

    The Artistic Director should get up on the stage, as WB Yeats did , and face down the bigots , if necessary.

    “Players and painted stage took all my love,
    And not the things that they were emblems of “.

  6. Josh says

    I agree with MCNNYC–well stated! The guy had the opportunity to talk about Rent’s positive messages (that have nothing to do with promiscuity, but everything to do with hope and self-determination). Instead he says we are not promoting it from an institutional standpoint. After that interview, you almost think they WILL cave and close the show.

  7. J.R. says

    @ Truthiness. Oh yes, the show is just so aweful. That’s why it won Best Musical, ran for 12 years, toured for even more years, won the Pulitzer Prize, reinvigorated what a musical can & should be, and has a countless base of fans whose lives are forever changed by it’s message.

  8. David Gigler says

    Just to defend Spokane : Bent, Falsetto’s and Strangers on Earth were all produced in Spokane in the mid-nineties to sold out houses and no protests. It really is a North Idaho thing.

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