Chris Culliver | Football (American) | News | San Francisco | Sports | Super Bowl

San Francisco 49er Chris Culliver Visits The Trevor Project as Follow-Up to Apology for Anti-Gay Remarks: PHOTO

Culliver

San Francisco 49er cornerback Chris Culliver, who made headlines in the days leading up to the Super Bowl when he told radio host Artie Lange that gays were not welcome in the locker room or the NFL, tweeted a photo this afternoon from the offices of The Trevor Project, the leading suicide resource and hotline for LGBTQ youth.

Wrote Culliver, who appears to be getting educated on the topic: "Great time at LGBTQ the Q is for (question)"

The visit is a follow-up on a promise Culliver made along with his apology, that he would be attending an educational training program at the organization to learn about the difficulties faced by youth who bear the brunt of anti-gay remarks, bullying, and rejection from society.

Said Culliver last month:

"As an African American male, I should know better. Hate and discrimination have a lasting effect, and words matter. I also have a responsibility to myself, and especially to my young fans to be a better role model. The kids who look up to me and other athletes are the future of our country, and our future deserves better than fear, hate and discrimination... I was wrong, and I want to learn how to make it right. That's why I reached out to an organization called The Trevor Project... No child should ever feel like they are less than anyone else, and God has put me through this storm so I can learn from my mistakes and help make sure no child has to feel that way, again."

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Comments

  1. I have heard him speak, and the above statement did not come from him. He is just trying to redeem himself for the media.

    Posted by: Jayson | Mar 4, 2013 7:06:40 PM


  2. Okay, that sounds like a real and sincere apology, beyond the crappy 'I'm sorry if your feelings were hurt' BS that most people try when they really step in it.

    I guess that makes me feel a little less guilty for thinking he's totally hot...

    Though I'll always quote Ronald Reagan on this and only this: Trust, but verify.

    Posted by: Ryan | Mar 4, 2013 7:08:41 PM


  3. Okay, that sounds like a real and sincere apology, beyond the crappy 'I'm sorry if your feelings were hurt' BS that most people try when they really step in it.

    I guess that makes me feel a little less guilty for thinking he's totally hot...

    Though I'll always quote Ronald Reagan on this and only this: Trust, but verify.

    Posted by: Ryan | Mar 4, 2013 7:08:43 PM


  4. Seems to be an apology written by the admin guy at the SF 49 ers. Fake.

    Posted by: rise | Mar 4, 2013 7:13:21 PM


  5. Seems to be an apology written by the admin guy at the SF 49 ers. Fake.

    Posted by: rise | Mar 4, 2013 7:13:23 PM


  6. God did not put you through a storm; you did.

    How much better things would be if he engaged his brain before opening his mouth.

    Now loudly say that gay footballers should come out and be properly treated and that a football locker room is no place for phobes.

    Make it work Chris.

    Posted by: JackFknTwist | Mar 4, 2013 7:14:06 PM


  7. Well, it's a greater act of contrition than the Catholic Church seems capable of.

    Posted by: Glenn I | Mar 4, 2013 7:41:07 PM


  8. this is more than most folks in similar situations have done.

    and here's the reality - a lot of homophobia is really homo-*ignorance*.

    cheers to his progression, and another in hopes it inspires similar progressions in others.

    Posted by: Little Kiwi | Mar 4, 2013 7:41:15 PM


  9. At least he's trying. Hopefully some good does come from this on his part.

    Posted by: Francis | Mar 4, 2013 7:44:23 PM


  10. Yes, he said something stupid and ignorant. Yes, someone probably helped him craft that apology.

    But kudos for him for having the balls to show up at the Trevor Project and at least make an effort. He could have just released the statement.

    If he wouldn't have gone, we would have criticized him for that too. Let's try to be a lil' optimistic.

    Posted by: jR | Mar 4, 2013 7:51:39 PM


  11. Everyone's apologies are always written by someone else...a PR agency, manager, etc. At least whoever wrote his finally got it right--i.e., no "*if* I offended someone" or "sorry to those I offended (and no one else?)". The apology takes responsibility for his wrongs. We can just hope that he really knows he was wrong and truly wants to make amends. I'm willing to give him the benefit of the doubt. Otherwise, what hope is there if we don't believe that people's opinions can evolve?

    Posted by: CHAD | Mar 4, 2013 7:55:19 PM


  12. It doesn't matter so much if he sincerely changes his point of view. I imagine those kinds of changes take quite a long time. At least his story has set an example about what is okay and what is not okay, and I think that will be more meaningful to gay youth.

    As a teenager I remember a classmate saying that "f*gs were dirty" in a class discussion about AIDS, and his apology to the class meant less than the fact that he was made to give one.

    Posted by: Thomas | Mar 4, 2013 8:26:47 PM


  13. This means nothing to me. Se all know how he really feels. Fake.

    Posted by: Stephen | Mar 4, 2013 9:07:18 PM


  14. The commentators are overlook one very, very significant point here. The narrative isn't this picture...the narrative in this story is how truly effective it is when our community becomes galvanized and combats homophobia. How when we challenge, and call out, then educate homophobic view points is how we truly create a mental shift.

    15 years ago, this man's comments would have gone overlooked. 15 years ago, some 70% of Americans were against full LGBT equal rights. Today, homophobia by public figures is addressed, challenged, and those public figures responsible are requested to evaluate their homophobia. And today, a majority of Americans are for full LGBT rights/marriage. Those things go hand in hand......and they matter.

    Don't ever let yourself forget that.

    Posted by: Scott Johansen | Mar 4, 2013 9:17:02 PM


  15. @ Scott Johansen

    Preach! well said and that basically summed it up.

    Posted by: Marcus-ATL | Mar 4, 2013 9:18:03 PM


  16. Scott Johansen-
    I agree. And I remember there were a few trolls on here who were saying it's silly to be mad at him for his comments because they won't make a difference. When in reality, speaking up and speaking our for our respect goes hand in hand with attaining our rights. When people are forced to confront their bigotry; they go inward, and get exposure. All demographics have realized that, and today, the gay community asks those who battle with homophobia to confront their prejudice. But it starts with calling the prson out. Not being complacent and kicking rocks.

    Posted by: L.C | Mar 4, 2013 9:21:06 PM


  17. what he said...

    Posted by: bandanajack | Mar 4, 2013 9:22:52 PM


  18. I know from my own family that when you hold homophobes accountable, they are more motivated to change their tune. If they see you're genuinly concerned over their hurtful comments, and ask them to stop, and then explain why you think they should not be so narrow minded----they'll usually get it, and really evolve. I know this from my own cousins, and even older uncles. It's when they have no one to correct their bigotry where it gets complicated. I think each and every one of us gays, lesbians, bisexuals have an opportunity to help the minds of those around us grow.

    Posted by: Okie Lion | Mar 4, 2013 9:23:30 PM


  19. I'm glad to see him do this, regardless of his private motivations. We've made progress whether he's doing this because it's genuine or because he'll get in trouble for not doing it.

    Posted by: Seattle Mike | Mar 4, 2013 9:25:13 PM


  20. I've read a bit about Chris Culliver. I think he made stupid comments he doesn't actually believe and that we should welcome his contrition and, ultimately, forgive him.

    Posted by: matt | Mar 4, 2013 9:26:11 PM


  21. I've read a bit about Chris Culliver. I think he made stupid comments he doesn't actually believe and that we should welcome his contrition and, ultimately, forgive him.

    Posted by: matt | Mar 4, 2013 9:26:40 PM


  22. This is huge. PR or not, I can't imagine that he stays with his previous attitudes after visiting Trevor Project. And the fact that people have to do something like this is pretty amazing. Even 5 years ago this would have never happened. Too bad countries outside the USA (like Poland or Russia) don't have strong pro-gay lobbying groups to make people like Lech Welesa see their errors.

    Posted by: zeddy | Mar 4, 2013 9:46:31 PM


  23. If someone else wrote the apology so what??
    Do any of you think celebrities, politicians write their own speeches, apologies??? well, they don't. ps. There's no Santa either.

    Posted by: Karma | Mar 4, 2013 10:15:59 PM


  24. It doesn't matter who wrote the words. He said them. It is the official statement - the public statement that chips away at misguided legacies. It's a process. There is no magic pill that is going to come along and poof! - make the remaining 50% of our own neighbors think "Oh, they aren't perverted dog f**kers afterall". For so many of you, what would be good enough?? Why should they bother to apologize at all?

    Posted by: dixichuk | Mar 4, 2013 10:22:27 PM


  25. I don't believe a word his publicist wrote for him.

    Posted by: B-rod | Mar 4, 2013 10:27:40 PM


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