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Robbie Rogers Says Not a Single Gay Player Has Reached Out to Him

Rogers

LA Galaxy player Robbie Rogers, who came out of the closet earlier this year, says no gay players have reached out to him, the BBC reports:

"I haven't received a letter or text or anything from one footballer that wants to talk about these issues," he said.

He thinks that is because players are too scared to do so.

"I've received phone calls and I've spoken with all my friends here in the UK and around the world that have supported me, but I haven't had one message from a [gay] footballer," he told BBC Newsnight. "It reminds me of the fear that I had - you remember that atmosphere and how it made you feel. It just shows there's a huge problem. What do you do to change that, do you try to support them to create an environment that would support them to come out and they would feel comfortable in? It's really tough."

(photo - Rogers (left) with boyfriend Greg Berlanti and the Pres., via Instagram)

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Comments

  1. There's also a chance that there just aren't many other gay players. And other gay players might see how visible Rogers is and don't want that for themselves.

    Posted by: Paul R | Dec 19, 2013 11:41:27 AM


  2. Maybe there just aren't any others (which I doubt).

    And I doubt the ones that exist would be "scared" to contact another gay player--after all, I am sure he would not "out" them if they did not want to be out...

    No, I suspect that, as I have suggested before, most more masculine gay men simply do not want to associate themselves with what "gay" has become--among activists and in the media--defined, as it is now, by the culture of effeminacy and "gender-non-conformity" and the anti-masculinity mindset they represent, which is anathema to the masculine values that almost all male competitive athletes, regardless of sexual orientation, hold dear.

    And who honestly can blame them?

    Posted by: Rick | Dec 19, 2013 11:44:05 AM


  3. I hope Robbie knows that as an out gay footballer he is an inspiration and role model to lots of still closeted gay boys, especially those in sports. I love that picture of a beaming President with Robbie and his boyfriend Greg. Mr. Obama you're the best.

    Posted by: andrew | Dec 19, 2013 11:45:03 AM


  4. It takes time. Not everyone has the strength and courage to lead and be a vanguard. To those who do, I tip my hat.

    Posted by: Little Kiwi | Dec 19, 2013 11:51:58 AM


  5. btw - as long as "effeminate gays" keep self-hating gays permanently closeted and their hatred confined to anonymously-written internet comments, then those girls are doing just fiiine ;-) keep it up, betches :D

    Posted by: Little Kiwi | Dec 19, 2013 11:55:42 AM


  6. Actually, Rick, I'm pretty sure that most masculine athletes--gay or otherwise--are smart enough to know that they define themselves.

    Unlike you, they aren't frightened of being defined by society. That's solely your hangup.

    Posted by: crispy | Dec 19, 2013 12:18:28 PM


  7. "Actually, Rick, I'm pretty sure that most masculine athletes--gay or otherwise--are smart enough to know that they define themselves.

    Unlike you, they aren't frightened of being defined by society. That's solely your hangup."

    Read the stories of any of the few prominent athletes that have come out and one thing that jumps out at you is that they felt that there was a conflict between geing gay on the one hand.....and being an athlete on the other. Wade Davis, who now heads up the "You Can Play" project, did not even want to appraoch any gay groups because he thought that, being a football player, he would get a hostile reaction from them (because so many of these activist types despise sports in general and football in particular, a reflection of the fact that they fear masculinity and the values associated with it).

    The fact is that the masculine values and male bonding that sports stress--especially team sports--are horrifying to effeminate gay men and have accordingly been rejected by them.

    You may have misunderstood my point. I don't think masculine gay men who are athletes are not comfortable with themselves, necessarily--I think for the most part they are or they could not have gone into an activity where they are sure to encounter a lot of homophobia.....No, I simply think their values system is at odds with the values system that most gay activists have....and they therefore want nothing to do with them

    Th

    Posted by: Rick | Dec 19, 2013 12:30:48 PM


  8. "When queens collide"....

    Posted by: Ankerich | Dec 19, 2013 12:31:58 PM


  9. Statistically, it's basically impossible that there aren't any other gay players... so that's just silly talk.

    There are likely a fair number of gay players in the MLS alone.

    Let's do that math. 20 teams with about 30 players each equates to about 600 players. In actuality, it's higher than that, but we'll use the 600 as a nice round number.

    Given that 5% is a good, conservative number of how many gay people there are in the population as a whole, there should at least be 30 gay players in the MLB proportionately.

    Even if we halve that percent though -- and maybe surmise that a lot of really good soccer players never made it to the MLB because of discrimination or fear -- it would be 15 players.

    Personally, I don't really buy that. I think there's as many good arguments to suggest a higher rate of gay players in soccer than the population at large, at least in the US. Any gay athlete growing up may have seen it as a 'safer choice' than the "macho" Big 4 sports, as well as the fact that there are a lot of soccer teams that can be played away from one's school teams, which isn't generally the case for football, baseball or hockey.

    Then there's the fact that there's a high percentage of latino players who play soccer, which is statistically one of the most LGBT friendly ethnicities in the US.

    Whatever the number of gay players in the MLS is, though, it's not 1. It's considerably more than that -- and that doesn't take into account any of the thousands and thousands of players who play soccer professionally or semi-professionally around the world.

    Posted by: Ryan | Dec 19, 2013 12:34:28 PM


  10. I am glad he's out, but coming out is an invidual choice and even though he is a good example, for other gay players the time is not suitable.

    Posted by: Matt27 | Dec 19, 2013 12:35:58 PM


  11. If you're over 25 or so and you're still not out - something is wrong with you - I can empathize but it's weird. I'm just theorizing but it's those types of guys who usually turn into big time whores (MSMs) spreading diseases OR they become really anti-gay and pretend they're not gay and do all the damage.

    Posted by: Me? I'mALWAYSRIGHT | Dec 19, 2013 12:46:25 PM


  12. Of course, there are many more gay players than Robbie Rogers, but it will be only the younger players who will come out. The older more established players will remain in the closet while actively playing. It will take a younger player who grew up in a "Will and Grace" world to find the courage to stand up and say "This is who I am". Never easy to do, but it is not surprising that the other gay players are not rushing to come out.

    Posted by: Howard B | Dec 19, 2013 12:56:43 PM


  13. @ Rick is in the closet

    Posted by: Kim | Dec 19, 2013 1:28:06 PM


  14. He has a massive ego to think people will go to him just because he came out. Guys will come out when they are ready and not because other gay guys brow beat them by saying it is their responsibility to future generations.

    Posted by: Perry | Dec 19, 2013 1:53:37 PM


  15. Rick: God, you are stupid beyond belief.

    There are plenty of gay players, even Angela Merkel talked about protections if a german soccer player decided to come out.

    The problem in soccer are not other players, a lot of them are gay friendly (of course there are exceptions), the problem is if you have an homophobic coach he can destroy your career. And some of the directives are conservative.

    And of course, there are a part of the hooligans that are linked to far right movements like neonazis.

    So it's not easy to come out. Being received with an ovations like Robbie was when he started to play with LA Galaxy, it will be difficult to get in europe or sout america where soccer is the main sport

    Posted by: jjose712 | Dec 19, 2013 1:54:22 PM


  16. @ Rick; Still addicted to trolling, eh? Do your palms start getting sweaty when you visit this site on any given day?

    Never found any offline friends to occupy more of your time? Still seeing your filth all over the place here indicating you still have no worthy purpose for living.

    I have suggestion for you;
    Become a follower of that self-loathing loser Jack Malebranche and declare yourself an Androphile. You can become 'blood brothers' with someone and finally END THE MADNESS of your trolling.

    GET OUT of our communities already; you don't belong here. You're just coming accross as someone hopelessly addicted to trolling and can't help yourself to stop. It's not healthy for you, Rick.

    Posted by: seeya | Dec 19, 2013 3:10:22 PM


  17. People need to stop picking on Rick here he has a point! The image of the gay man in society is still the effeminate queen! There are NOT a lot of positive masculine images of gay men. There are tons of gay men in the MLS and YES I do believe they fear coming out. Why do people think it is so easy to come out? And the poster who said something is wrong with an individual who comes out before they turn 25 is a MORON! Gay men probably worry about their families or friends. Don't people realize coming out doesn't just AFFECT the individual it also AFFECTS the people AROUND the individual. Maybe gay male athletes are closeted because they worry how coming out to the world can affect their families? Or maybe these guys worry about losing endorsements or maybe they worry about being treated differently by teammates or coaches?

    LOOK, what happened to Justin Fashanu, he came out and his coach and brother treated him like GARBAGE! Don't forget Justin committed suicide at age 37 he couldn't handle the pain of being gay.

    So, for all the gay rights activists on this forum BACK OFF!

    Posted by: Jake | Dec 19, 2013 3:31:46 PM


  18. People need to stop picking on Rick here he has a point! The image of the gay man in society is still the effeminate queen! There are NOT a lot of positive masculine images of gay men. There are tons of gay men in the MLS and YES I do believe they fear coming out. Why do people think it is so easy to come out? And the poster who said something is wrong with an individual who comes out before they turn 25 is a MORON! Gay men probably worry about their families or friends. Don't people realize coming out doesn't just AFFECT the individual it also AFFECTS the people AROUND the individual. Maybe gay male athletes are closeted because they worry how coming out to the world can affect their families? Or maybe these guys worry about losing endorsements or maybe they worry about being treated differently by teammates or coaches?

    LOOK, what happened to Justin Fashanu, he came out and his coach and brother treated him like GARBAGE! Don't forget Justin committed suicide at age 37 he couldn't handle the pain of being gay.

    So, for all the gay rights activists on this forum BACK OFF!

    Posted by: Jake | Dec 19, 2013 3:31:47 PM


  19. People need to stop picking on Rick here he has a point! The image of the gay man in society is still the effeminate queen! There are NOT a lot of positive masculine images of gay men. There are tons of gay men in the MLS and YES I do believe they fear coming out. Why do people think it is so easy to come out? And the poster who said something is wrong with an individual who comes out before they turn 25 is a MORON! Gay men probably worry about their families or friends. Don't people realize coming out doesn't just AFFECT the individual it also AFFECTS the people AROUND the individual. Maybe gay male athletes are closeted because they worry how coming out to the world can affect their families? Or maybe these guys worry about losing endorsements or maybe they worry about being treated differently by teammates or coaches?

    LOOK, what happened to Justin Fashanu, he came out and his coach and brother treated him like GARBAGE! Don't forget Justin committed suicide at age 37 he couldn't handle the pain of being gay.

    So, for all the gay rights activists on this forum BACK OFF!

    Posted by: Jake | Dec 19, 2013 3:31:47 PM


  20. Justin Fashanu was nearly 20 years ago... and BRITISH! How does that have any significance on Major League Soccer players in the United States?

    Try being less stupid, Jake.

    Posted by: crispy | Dec 19, 2013 3:42:17 PM


  21. @ "People need to stop picking on Rick..."

    We will if just leave us effeminate queens the f.ck alone. Nobody's bothering him.

    Posted by: Derrick from Philly | Dec 19, 2013 3:43:28 PM


  22. Jake is a sockpuppet of Rick's.

    Posted by: TheZoo | Dec 19, 2013 3:54:19 PM


  23. Sockpuppet Jake should post the same thing multiple times to make sure EVERYONE sees they're a sockpuppet.

    Posted by: Shazam | Dec 19, 2013 4:00:08 PM


  24. No, for the 100th time, people need to learn to ignore trolls. But so many of you seem utterly incapable of doing so.

    Posted by: Paul R | Dec 19, 2013 4:29:10 PM


  25. An adorable gay couple openly embraced by the President. Look at those smiles! What event was this?

    Robbie, do you really believe in your heart that you're the only gay footballer? Have you seriously not seen those 'Robbie Rogers effect' .gifs?

    Posted by: SERIOUSLY | Dec 19, 2013 5:03:38 PM


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