AIDS/HIV | Uganda | Yoweri Museveni

Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni Signs Law Criminalizing HIV Transmission

MuseveniUgandan President Yoweri Museveni has officially criminalized the transmission of HIV, a move that many public health experts worry could ultimately exacerbate Uganda’s well documented struggles with the virus. Similar to law that sometimes appear here in the U.S. Uganda’s new HIV Prevention and AIDS Control Bill targets those individuals who willfully expose others to the virus without their knowledge. In theory provisions like these would encourage people to exercise safer sex practices. Unfortunately, that is seldom the case. Rather than fostering openness about one’s HIV status, the criminalization of HIV has been proven to be ineffective and ultimately harmful.

The circumstances under which the mandate made its way through the Ugandan legal systems are dubious at best. The law, which surfaced earlier this week, is dated to have have officially been signed in late July, closely following the nullification of Uganda’s Anti-Homosexuality Act.

The AHA’s passing was invalidated after legal review revealed that the Ugandan Parliament did not have the quorum of its members necessary to turn the homophobic legislation into law. President Museveni has insisted that the law, which is being reintroduced the Parliament, will be gentler towards adults consensually engaging in homosexual acts. Those found in violation of the original AHA could be sentenced to life in prison but, Museveni says, the revised law focuses solely on the protection of children.

Read the full text of Uganda's law criminalizing the transmission of HIV AFTER THE JUMP...

HIV and AIDS Prevention and Control Bill 2009

 

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Comments

  1. Yes, criminalizing HIV transmission sounds good but in practice it drives the risky behaviors that favor the spread of HIV into the shadows, risking the marginalized segments of society and in the end driving infection rates up, just as Russia is experiencing a boom in HIV infections after making being gay a crime.

    Posted by: bkmn | Aug 22, 2014 8:58:18 AM


  2. These people must be stupider than they look

    Posted by: Will | Aug 22, 2014 9:13:06 AM


  3. Shall we also make drunk driving legal?! I mean, it's willfully exposing the public to a death risk, but if they're willing to get on the roads it's a risk they're taking! Alcoholism is a disease, and this anti drunk driving stigmatism is just horrible. Everyone should be allowed to endanger others! Everything should be legal!

    Posted by: Carmelo | Aug 22, 2014 9:42:09 AM


  4. Gift givers of the world unite! Visit breedingzone.com for meeting times. Nothing beats poking holes in condoms and pozzing a nice negative ass! That's what this article is promoting, no?

    Posted by: Carmelo | Aug 22, 2014 9:46:29 AM


  5. Gift givers of the world unite! Visit breedingzone.com for meeting times. Nothing beats poking holes in condoms and pozzing a nice negative ass! That's what this article is promoting, no?

    Posted by: Carmelo | Aug 22, 2014 9:46:30 AM


  6. Can you explain how knowingly killing someone is the same as being gay? It's like you're doing Scott Lively's work for him!

    Posted by: me | Aug 22, 2014 10:04:10 AM


  7. What a Stone Age culture!

    Posted by: Jack M | Aug 22, 2014 10:08:25 AM


  8. And we keep sending them money.

    Posted by: Mike Ryan | Aug 22, 2014 10:52:05 AM


  9. This is real hardcore stupidity, and it is mortal. Many Ugandans will die because of this shamelessly ignorant president.

    Posted by: Roman Bolliger | Aug 22, 2014 1:50:16 PM


  10. You commenters realize that there are states in the U.S. that have the same laws that criminalize transmission of HIV? These laws have been on the books for decades.

    Remember, white American evangelicals went to Uganda started the anti-gay push that resulted anti-gay hysteria.

    Posted by: Marshall | Aug 22, 2014 2:00:20 PM


  11. I read through the massive report on HIV issued by WHO earlier this year. I didn't see any evidence that laws like this result in increased transmission. I think that is a line of BS that certain activists created as a way to justify doing nothing about people who knowingly or recklessly expose others.

    We need to punish people who have decided that they simply don't care about others and that they are going to get their nut regardless of the consequences to others. There is a guy in Missouri who is awaiting trial on charges that he exposed up to 300 men without telling them about his status. When asked why he didn't disclose, he said it was because he "feared rejection." He and others like him need to be put in fear of prison so that they are incentivized to do the right thing and disclose.

    Posted by: Thomas | Aug 22, 2014 2:59:29 PM


  12. @CHARLES PULLIAM-MOORE: "The AHA’s passing was invalidated after legal review revealed that the Ugandan Parliament did not have the quorum of its members necessary to turn the homophobic legislation into law."

    The lack of quorum wasn't revealed by legal review, it was well known at the time of the bill's passage and was a subject of dispute between the Parliament and Museveni. Towleroad reported on this in January:
    http://www.towleroad.com/2014/01/ugandan-president-blocks-anti-homosexuality-bill-calls-gays-abnormal.html

    Posted by: JJ | Aug 22, 2014 3:07:40 PM


  13. Is it just me, or does anyone else feel a bit fed up with the link between gay people and HIV? HIV has nothing to do with sexuality, it's related to actions people partake in. I'd rather gay charities and news feeds prioritised their focus and funds into preventing anti-gay bullying, than feeding the gay aids stereotype.

    Posted by: john | Aug 23, 2014 9:12:42 AM


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