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Robbie Rogers Talks New Book, Coming Out, MLS Cup Win - VIDEO

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Robbie Rogers, the first openly gay man to compete in a major North American sports league, has opened up about his journey to becoming an out-and-proud pro soccer player.

Speaking with Blaine Stewart for News Channel 3, Rogers discusses his candid memoir “Coming Out To Play”, coming out in his 20s, his big win in the MLS Cup and becoming a role model for LGBT youth.

In October, it was announced ABC closed a deal for a new sitcom called "Men In Shorts," based on Robbie's life.

Watch the interview, AFTER THE JUMP...

Continue reading "Robbie Rogers Talks New Book, Coming Out, MLS Cup Win - VIDEO" »


Gay Canadian Figure Skater, Olympic Silver Medalist Eric Radford Is Pushing A Perfect 10

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Canadian figure skater Eric Radford (above) seriously considered coming out publicly prior to the Sochi Olympics. 

But ultimately Radford decided he didn't want to be a poster child at an event where gay rights were sure to be a hot-button issue — or worse, risk scrutiny from Russian authorities looking to enforce the country's anti-gay law. 

Radford.Eric4"My concern was that I would be known as 'the gay athlete' if I came out at the Olympics, rather than Eric the medalling figure skater who happens to be gay," Radford tells OutSports. "And I felt uncomfortable with that title."

Whether you agree with it or not, Radford's decision appears to have paid off. Focused on the competition and not media hype over his sexuality, he helped the Canadian team earn a silver medal in Sochi.

Now, as he and his figure skating partner, Meagan Duhamel (right), continue to enjoy remarkable success, Radford decided the time was right. According to OutSports, he becomes the first elite figure skater to come out at the height of his career. 

Radford and Duhamel are three-time defending Canadian pairs champions — and they won bronze at the World Championships in 2013 and 2014. Now, they're setting their sights on the 2018 Olympics in South Korea — Radford even got a tattoo on his chest as a symbol of his dedication to that goal. 

In the OutSports interview, Radford recalls how he was teased mercilessly as a child, not only because figure skating was considered a "gay" sport but because he had a lisp. But being gay in figure skating pairs also has its advantages, Radford says:

"A lot of pairs end up dating one another. It can become risky because your on-ice training can be affected by your off-ice relationship. If you have a fight at home, it makes that training difficult. I used to joke around that I'm the ultimate pair-boy. I never had to worry about developing an off-ice relationship."

Although he just came out publicly, Radford says many in the figure skating community already knew. He and his boyfriend have been together four years, and they're raising a daughter together.  

Read Radford's full interview with OutSports here.

Watch videos of Radford completing a performance despite a broken nose in 2011 and taking the ice bucket challenge with his boyfriend earlier this year, AFTER THE JUMP ...  

 

Veteran Major League Baseball Umpire Dale Scott Comes Out as Gay

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Dale Scott, a Major League Baseball umpire for the last 29 seasons, came out of the closet in the "quietest way possible" this month in an issue of the subscription-only Referee magazine, Outsports reports.

Astonishingly, Scott is "the first Major League Baseball umpire to publicly say he is gay while active (and the first out active male official in the NBA, NHL, NFL or MLB)."

ScottScott's coming out was a photo of him and his partner of 28-years Michael Rausch aboard a plane traveling to the season opener between the Diamondbacks and the Dodgers, Outsports adds:

[Writer Peter] Jackel talked to friends of Scott's who grew up with him in Eugene, Ore., but nothing was written about his private life since he became an umpire. Prior to publication, the magazine's editor, Jeff Stern, wanted some non-game photos and that's when Scott made a decision to reveal a part of himself previously hidden from the public.

After consulting with his partner, Michael Rausch, Scott decided to send the photo below of the two of them...

"My thought process was," Scott told Outsports in his first interview on the subject, "is that there's a story about my career and how I got started in umpiring and they're talking to people I have known since junior high and it didn't seem right to have a whole story and pictures without a picture of Mike and I, someone who's been with me through this entire process. We met the October after my first year in the big leagues.

"Obviously, when I sent that picture to Jeff, I knew exactly what it meant. In a small way, this was opening that door in a publication that wasn't going to be circulated nationwide. It could be picked up, but it's not Time magazine. I made that decision to go ahead and do it because I felt it was the right thing to do.

Scott said the photo would not be a surprise to the MLB organization or the umpire staff and said he's not seeking attention for his story, though he may get it. The story is appearing on ESPN and other sports outlets.

Scott was able to add Rausch as his domestic partner in his contract with the umpire's union in 2010 (the two have been legally married since 2013) and says that people began offering his support after that, noting how baseball has changed:

"The first 10 years of my Major League umpire career, I would have been horrified if a story had come out that I was gay," he said. "But guys unprovoked started to approach me and say, 'I just want you to know that I would walk on the field with you any day, you're a great guy, a great umpire and I couldn't care less about your personal life.' Basically what they were saying without me provoking it was 'I know and I don't care.' That meant a lot to me because it surprised me since I had not brought it up. At first I was uncomfortable because I had spent my whole life hiding that fact from people even though I wasn't hiding it from myself or my friends."

Scott has worked three World Series, three All-Star Games, two no-hitters and numerous playoff games, according to OS. He adds:

"People scream at me because I'm an umpire. The last thing I want is people screaming at me because I'm gay. I'm an umpire who happens to be gay. I'm not trying to be some gay person who happens to be an umpire."

Read the full piece here and the Referee article here.

(inset image Referee magazine)


Minnesota Newspapers Publish Misleading, Transphobic Ads From Anti-LGBT Hate Group

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Minnesota's largest daily newspaper is doubling down on its decision to publish misleading, fear-mongering, transphobic ads opposing a policy that would allow high school students to participate in athletics according to their gender identity.

But The Star-Tribune of Minneapolis isn't alone. Also publishing the latest ad from the anti-LGBT Minnesota Child Protection League on Sunday were The St. Cloud Times and The Duluth News Tribune, according to Media Matters

The ad states:

"THE END OF GIRLS' SPORTS? Her dreams of a scholarship shattered, your 14-year-old daughter just lost her position on an all-girl team to a male ... and now she may have to shower with him. Are you willing to let that happen?"

The ad calls on people to contact Minnesota State High School League board members, who are set to consider the policy Thursday. 

Back in September, LGBT advocates slammed The Star Tribune for publishing a similar ad from the Minnesota Child Protection League opposing the policy, which was originally set to be voted on in October: 

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According to the LGBT Sports Coalition, 15 states have adopted policies similar to the one proposed in Minnesota, with no reported problems related to trans athletic participation:  

"By running the ad again, the Star Tribune has once again contributed to a negative stereotype at the same time as it has potentially put trans youth in danger by fostering a demonstrably untrue accusation. Editorial decisions matter. Research has shown that LGBT teens and young adults are at greater risk for depression and bullying, and that bullying is a contributing factor in many suicides. By accepting and publishing this kind of advertisement, the Star Tribune has empowered the untrue expectation that one minority group -- transgender children, no less -- are a threat to their classmates.

"Worse yet, the Star Tribune already knew that the content of the ad was deliberately misinformative about trans youth while advocating discrimination, because editors at the Star Tribune have already discussed the first ad (run by the same local hate group in September) with local and national LGBT organizations after they ran the first ad in September. The Star Tribune already knew that the content of the new ad also misrepresented trans lives and endangered trans youth -- and elected to run it again anyway."

The Star Tribune is also taking heat on Twitter, including from NBC Sports writer Aaron Gleeman: 

Representatives from The Star Tribune, which editorialized in favor of the trans-inclusive policy in October, haven't commented on the latest ad. In September, the newspaper's vice president of marketing and public relations told Minneapolis City Pages: "The ad in question met all the requirements of our ad policy. Not much I can tell you about it beyond that."

But it appears that for many, that explanation isn't cutting it. While the advertising director of The Duluth News Tribune told Media Matters it's a question of free speech, some are calling on subscribers to make their own statement: 


Openly Gay Australian Athlete Simon Dunn Will Turn You Into a Bobsled Fan in No Time: PHOTOS

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Australian Bobsledder Simon Dunn recently announced he's gay and is the first person in the sport to come out reports Same Same.

Currently Dunn's role on the Aussie team is brakemen for fellow teammate Lucas Mata who was the brakemen for Heathe Spence at the Sochi Olympics. Dunn also plays rugby for the Sydney Convicts, and says it was an easy crossover sport into bobsledding as training for both of them require similar exercises.

Dunn2Said Dunn:

"I was approached by a member of the Australian team through my rugby club in Calgary. Rugby is an easy crossover sport to bobsleigh, as the training is similar and the main idea is to run hard and fast.

"My years playing rugby for the Sydney Convicts in Sydney definitely helped my conditioning to be ready for the sport."

Dunn competed in the North America Cup in Utah this month, competing against other teams from around the world; many of them past olympians. Dunn is competing in upcoming competitions in Calgary, Lake Placid and Park City.

Dunn is also quite active on Instagram, posting some sexy shots of him playing rugby, showing off his guns and numerous shirtless pictures. Need further convincing on whether to follow him or not? He's also single, posts pictures of himself with puppies and is apparently great with children. Maybe it's the season, but it looks like winter athletes really know how to turn up the heat

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Two more shots, AFTER THE JUMP...

Continue reading "Openly Gay Australian Athlete Simon Dunn Will Turn You Into a Bobsled Fan in No Time: PHOTOS " »


Uganda Awarded 2017 World Cross Country Championships Despite Fears Of Harsh New Anti-Gay Law - VIDEO

MuseveniDespite its severe anti-gay laws, Uganda has become the latest country to be awarded a major sporting event, reports Pink News.

Uganda last year passed a draconian anti-gay law which was eventually deemed to be unconstitutional. However, the African nation is expected to introduce an even more severe version of the law as a “Christmas gift” to the nation.

Uganda beat Bahrain - another no-go zone for gay people - to host the 2017 IAFF World Cross Country Championships.

It is expected that 700 athletes and hundreds of journalists will attend the event on March 23, 2017.

Of the decision to award the event to Uganda, sports minister Charles Bakkabulindi said:

“[President Yoweri Museveni] is passionate about athletics. He does not only receive all athletes whenever they shine but has gone a step further to give them a monthly stipend to motivate them. Not even football players get that." IAFF

The sporting world is making a habit of awarding international events to anti-gay nations of late. The 2017 and 2022 soccer World Cup has been awarded to Russia and Qatar respectively, despite both countries having controversial anti-gay laws.

Watch a report on Uganda's bid for the 2017 event, AFTER THE JUMP...

Continue reading "Uganda Awarded 2017 World Cross Country Championships Despite Fears Of Harsh New Anti-Gay Law - VIDEO" »


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