Wisconsin Hub




Seventh Circuit Puts Wisconsin Gay Marriages on Hold Until Supreme Court Action

The Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals has put a stay on its ruling earlier this month overturning Wisconsin's gay marriage ban until the Supreme Court weighs in on the matter, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports:

WisconsinThe 7th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals blocked its own order in the Wisconsin case two days after it blocked its order in a similar case out of Indiana. Those moves by the 7th Circuit were widely expected because of an earlier ruling by the Supreme Court that showed a majority of justices want the marriage bans around the country to remain in place while they consider whether to hear one of the lawsuits against those bans.

Last week, state Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen asked the U.S. Supreme Court to restore Wisconsin's gay marriage ban, arguing that the case that began in Madison offers the justices the best vehicle for resolving the historic question of whether bans on same-sex unions violate the U.S. Constitution.

The 7th Circuit said Wednesday that it would let that Supreme Court appeal play out.

"The stay will terminate automatically if the certiorari petition (to the Supreme Court) is denied or will terminate upon the judgment of the Supreme Court if the certiorari petition is granted," the 7th Circuit's one-page order reads.

Last week, plaintiffs in the Indiana and Wisconsin gay marriage cases urged the Supreme Court to review challenges to their states' gay marriage bans.

The court has announced it will consider those petitions in a private meeting September 29. 


Republican Jacob Dorsey Drops Out Of Race For Wisconsin Assembly Following More Homophobic, Racist Comments

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Jacob Dorsey, the 19-year-old Republican candidate for Wisconsin State Assembly, has dropped out of the race after racist and homophobic comments he had made on Twitter and YouTube surfaced, reports LGBTQ Nation.

On Monday we reported that Dorsey was facing a backlash following a tweet sent last December that contained a homophobic slur.

The tweet, which has since been deleted, read: Acob dorsey yourtube comment1

“10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals rejects #Utah’s request to stop same-sex marriages.” fags need 2 leave my favorite state alone.”

In a statement, Dorsey had apologised for the tweet and said “I regret using unacceptable and hurtful language on social media last year. I am a staunch supporter of traditional marriage, but the language I used is not in keeping with my character, family values and Christian upbringing.”

However, yesterday NOManiacs, a group that exposes hate speech, reported that Dorsey had posted further racist and homophobic comments on YouTube. The comments were posted to Dorsey’s since deleted “jdorsey1995″ YouTube channel, the same account name he used for Twitter and Instagram.

Dorsey - a former intern with Citizens for Decency who has been endorsed by Pro-Life Wisconsin and Wisconsin Right To Life - yesterday told the The Janesville Gazette that he had “decided to withdraw from the race due to insensitive remarks that have surfaced from years past. This race has been extremely hard on my family and myself.” Acob dorsey yourtube comment2

On Dorsey's resignation, NOManiacs said:

"We hope Jacob Dorsey truly regrets his posts. America needs leaders at all levels who champion diversity and are committed to represent all. Dorsey was not yet that person."


19-Year-Old Wisconsin Assembly GOP Nominee Faces Backlash For Anti-Gay Tweet

Jacob dorsey

Jacob Dorsey, the Republican candidate for Wisconsin State Assembly in the 44th District, is facing a backlash following a tweet sent last December that contained a homophobic slur, reports Channel 3000.

TweetThe tweet, which has since been deleted, read:

“10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals rejects #Utah’s request to stop same-sex marriages.” fags need 2 leave my favorite state alone.”

In a statement, Dorsey apologised for the tweet and said “I regret using unacceptable and hurtful language on social media last year.

I am a staunch supporter of traditional marriage, but the language I used is not in keeping with my character, family values and Christian upbringing.”

Dorsey, a former intern with Citizens for Decency who has been endorsed by Pro-Life Wisconsin and Wisconsin Right To Life, lists on Facebook a Ronald Reagan quote as his favourite: "Government's first duty is to protect the people, not run their lives."

A number of voters have since taken to Twitter to suggest that Dorsey's apology is less than sincere.


24,000 Transgender People May Be Ineligible To Vote In November Due to Voter ID- VIDEO

Voting laws transgender people

Strict voter ID laws in ten states could create barriers to voting and lead to possible disenfranchisement for more than 24,000 transgender voters this November, reports LGBTQ Nation.

MapAccording to the study “The Potential Impact of Voter Identification Laws on Transgender Voters in the 2014 General Election,” about 84,000 transgender people across the ten strict photo ID states are estimated to be eligible to vote. The 24,000 transgender voters who may face barriers to voting reside in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Mississippi, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Wisconsin.

In order for these 24,000 voting-eligible transgender people to obtain the updated photo IDs required to vote in the November 2014 general election, they must comply with the requirements for updating their state-issued or federally-issued IDs.

The study’s author Jody L. Herman, Ph.D, said:

“Some voters may not have the means or the ability to present the required voter identification for a variety of reasons, such as poverty, disability, or religious objection.

Transgender people have unique barriers to obtaining accurate IDs needed to vote.

As these ten states begin planning for their fall elections, educating poll workers is crucial in order to ensure that transgender voters in their states have fair access to the ballot.”

Watch the 2012 National Center for Transgender Equality's "Voting While Trans" campaign video, AFTER THE JUMP...

Continue reading "24,000 Transgender People May Be Ineligible To Vote In November Due to Voter ID- VIDEO" »


SCOTUS To Consider Hearing Gay Marriage Cases From 5 States on Sept. 29

SUPREMEThe Supreme Court has announced it will consider seven petitions from five states--Utah, Oklahoma, Virginia, Indiana and Wisconsinon--on whether those states' same-sex marriage bans are unconstitutional. The Court, currently on hiatus, will discuss the cases in a private meeting on September 29, its first conference of the year. Same-sex couples along with representatives of the states barring them from marrying have been petitioning the Court to review their cases and provide legal clarity on the question of marriage equality. USA Today reports:

By scheduling all for consideration simultaneously, the justices gave equal footing to the Indiana and Wisconsin cases just decided last week by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit. The 10th and 4th Circuits previously ruled in the other cases.

The court could agree to hear one or more cases this winter; deny them all, or delay its decision for a while.

In all five states, federal district and appellate judges have agreed that state bans on same-sex marriage should be struck down as unconstitutional. But those decisions are on hold pending the Supreme Court's review.

As The Wall Street Journal points out, the Supreme Court could have more cases headed its way very soon. Many are focsued on 4 pending cases before the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals, a court some legal analysts suspect is more likely than others to uphold marriage bans: "If that happens, it’s a virtual certainty that the Supreme Court would step in and resolve the disagreement."


Indiana and Wisconsin Ask Supreme Court To Review Challenges to Gay Marriage Bans, Plaintiffs Agree

6a00d8341c730253ef01a73e0b48f0970d-250wiAttorneys General from Indiana and Wisconsin filed petitions with the Supreme Court Tuesday, asking the Court to hear each state’s defense of their respective gay marriage bans that were both struck down by the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals. Notably, the 3 panel judge on the 7th Circuit ruled unanimously in favor of equality and against the bans—the first time such a decision was unanimous. The decision was written by Judge Richard Posner, whose pithy quips garnered media attention after he gutted the anti-equality arguments put forth by Indiana and Wisconsin. Now, the Supreme Court will have a chance to review Posner’s ruling. Chris Geidner from BuzzFeed reports:

6a00d8341c730253ef01a3fcd57649970b-250wiThe petitions are the sixth and seventh petitions seeking a writ of certiorari, which is the technical way the Supreme Court announces that it is taking a case.

Indiana presents a somewhat different case in practical terms — although it has not, thus far, made a difference in the legal analysis — in that the state has no constitutional ban on such marriages. It only has a state law banning them.

Quickly after the states filed their petitions, and as expected, the plaintiffs responded to the two states’ petitions, similarly urging the Supreme Court to grant the writs of certiorari:

6a00d8341c730253ef01a511ee26c6970c-200wiLambda Legal and the ACLU, representing the couples in the Indiana case, responded to Indiana’s certiorari petition, stating that the same-sex couples they represent “agree that the Court should grant review in this case because the issue is of fundamental importance to [the couples] and the country as a whole.”

The ACLU, representing the couples in the Wisconsin case, responded to Wisconsin’s petition on Tuesday as well.

Among the arguments put forth by both Indiana and Wisconsin, the most absurd assertion may have been that put forth by Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoller who, as Joe.My.God points out, argues,

"The court does not, and cannot, justify the assertion that Indiana’s definition of marriage targets homosexuals. The statue itself makes no mention of sexual orientation, and as the case record in this case amply demonstrates, homosexuals often do marry members of the opposite sex in Indiana.”


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