Human Rights Campaign Hub




New York Giants Hire Anti-Gay NOM Spokesperson David Tyree as Director of Player Development

Tyree

Towleroad readers will know former New York Giant David Tyree from a series of posts back in 2011 in when he became a spokesperson for the National Organization for Marriage (NOM).

GiantsHe has now been hired by the Giants as the director of player development.

Said Tyree in a video for NOM in 2011:

“Marriage is the only relationship that actually mirrors a relationship with God — it’s very unique in that way...If they pass this gay marriage bill...what I know will happen if this does comes forth is this will be the beginning of our country sliding toward...anarchy...That will be the moment our society loses its grip with what is right...I don't believe that truth is subjective...If you redefine [marriage...it changes the perception of what is good, what is right, and what is just..."

Tyree later went on to say that he would trade a Super Bowl win to stop gays from marrying and expressed concern for his kids:

 "I don't want my kids to think homosexuals are normal."

Tyree is also an advocate for gay conversion therapy, NJ.com reports:

His more divisive views -- like somebody can change their sexual identity through therapy --- came to light via a series of Twitter messages from 2011 first reported by NJ.com.

"I'll never be a former black," Tyree tweeted in June 2011. "I have met former homosexuals. That's the truth."

The tweets -- along with his crusade for years against gay marriage -- drew a strong rebuke Tuesday by the Human Rights Campaign, both in a response to an inquiry from NJ.com and in a press release Tuesday evening.

“When did Tyree decide to be straight?” asked Human Rights Campaign President Chad Griffin in a news release. “The idea that someone can change their sexual orientation or gender identity is ludicrous, and the New York Giants are risking their credibility by hiring someone who publicly advocates this junk science. His opposition to basic legal equality aside, David Tyree’s proselytizing of such dangerous practices goes against the positive work the Giants organization has done in recent years.

The Giants said in a statement that Tyree "was expressing his personal view, and that is not the view of the Giants organization."

Watch Tyree's video for NOM and an ESPN report on the hiring and backlash, AFTER THE JUMP...

Continue reading "New York Giants Hire Anti-Gay NOM Spokesperson David Tyree as Director of Player Development" »


Demi Lovato Releases Video Supporting Marriage Equality: WATCH

Lovato

Pop star Demi Lovato, who recently appeared at both NYC and L.A. Pride, revealed that her grandfather was gay at a Logo Trailblazers event, and released a music video with an LGBT rights message, appears in a new video from HRC's Americans for Marriage Equality Campaign.

Says Lovato in the clip: “I believe that love comes in all different shapes, sizes and colors. So whether you’re LGBT or straight, your love is valid, beautiful and an incredible gift. So let’s protect love and strengthen the institution of marriage by allowing loving, caring and committed same-sex couples to legally marry.”

Watch, AFTER THE JUMP...

Continue reading "Demi Lovato Releases Video Supporting Marriage Equality: WATCH" »


HRC's Chad Griffin Says Congress Must Narrow ENDA's Religious Exemption and Pass Full LGBT Civil Rights Bill

Human Rights Campaign President Chad Griffin on Wednesday called on Congress to narrow the religious exemption in the Employment Non-Discrimination Act one day after several other top LGBT rights groups including the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force and the ACLU pulled their support of the bill.

GriffinHRC had come under criticism for standing by the bill. Said Griffin in today's statement, posted at Buzzfeed:

The Human Rights Campaign supports the Employment Non-Discrimination Act for a very simple reason. It will guarantee millions of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in all 50 states explicit, reliable protections from discrimination in the workplace. We call on our allies in Congress to improve this bill’s overly broad religious exemption. A strong ENDA is worth fighting for because we cannot ignore the urgent need of countless LGBT people who do not have the luxury of waiting for these protections.

...We cannot and will not ignore the imperative of this moment. As long as this Congress is in session, we will fight for ENDA — with a narrowed religious exemption — because these workplace protections will change millions of lives for the better. But this movement has a responsibility to also chart a course for the future.

Griffin also stated the need for a full LGBT civil rights bill:

But regardless of whether or not ENDA passes in this session of Congress, it is time for the LGBT movement to throw its weight behind a fully comprehensive LGBT civil rights bill. A bill that, at long last, would bar discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity in all core civil rights categories — including housing, public accommodations, credit, education and, if ENDA fails to pass, in employment. This is a visionary idea that Congresswoman Bella Abzug brought to Congress in 1974. Its time has come.


As ACLU, GLAD, Lambda Legal, NCLR, and Transgender Law Center Pull Support for ENDA, HRC Holds On

Following this morning's statement that the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force (NGLTF) dropped their support for ENDA, four more major LGBT rights organizations have followed suit.

Via the ACLU: Aclu

The American Civil Liberties Union today announced that it is withdrawing its support for the Employment Non-Discrimination Act in a statement also signed by Gay & Lesbian Advocates & Defenders, Lambda Legal, the National Center for Lesbian Rights, and Transgender Law Center. The ACLU objects to a provision in the bill that would allow religiously affiliated employers to continue to discriminate based on sexual orientation and gender identity.

"Federal legislation to protect LGBT people from workplace discrimination is way beyond overdue, but Congress has no place giving religiously affiliated employers a license to discriminate against LGBT workers," said Laura W. Murphy, director of the ACLU's Washington Legislative Office. "We can no longer support a bill that treats LGBT discrimination as different and somehow more legitimate than other forms of discrimination."

President Obama has announced his intention to sign an executive order that would ban discrimination against LGBT people employed by federal contractors. The ACLU opposes any inclusion of a discrimination exemption in this executive order.

Read their statement HERE.

Meanwhile, the Human Rights Campaign continues to support the troubling, flawed piece of legislation.

Said HRC Vice President Fred Sainz in an email: "HRC supports ENDA because it will provide essential workplace protections to millions of LGBT people."

In related news, 45 LGBT groups have written a letter to President Obama asking him to ensure that the executive order he has promised to sign barring anti-LGBT discrimination by federal contractors "not contain any exemption beyond what is provided by the Constitution and Title VII."


Bisexual Asylum Seeker Avoids Deportation To Jamaica - VIDEO

Oraisha edwards

Orashia Edwards, a bisexual Jamaican man who says he faces danger in his native country because of his sexuality, learned on Tuesday that he will not be deported from the U.K.

Homophobia remains a major issue in Jamaican society.

The case for a judicial review of Home Secretary Theresa May's decision was thrown out by a judge in Leeds.

In his written judgement, Judge Clive Heaton QC said that Edwards was being dishonest about his sexuality.

According to Pink News, Edwards has been living in the U.K. for four years along with the rest of his family. He has a one-year-old daughter. Mr Edwards has not been in Jamaica for 14 years.

Speaking to the BBC after the verdict, Edwards said:

"This is my home, I feel safe here, my family and friends are here. I can't go back to Jamaica."

In a press release, activist organization Leeds For Change, which has claimed Home Office decisions behind asylum are prejudiced against LGBT applicants, said it “won’t stop fighting for Orashia to stay here in Leeds with us, his family and the LGBT community. An application to the European Court of Human Rights on behalf of Orashia will be issued shortly.”

All claims of bias in asylum applications have been denied by the government.

Edwards learned Tuesday that he will now not be deported from the U.K. A spokesperson from the Home Office refused to comment on the change in its decision.

Edwards is today in court submitting new evidence.

Watch State Of Limbo, a short documentary about the Edwards case, and a follow-up interview prior to the hearing, AFTER THE JUMP...

Continue reading "Bisexual Asylum Seeker Avoids Deportation To Jamaica - VIDEO" »


Mongolian Government Plans Reform To Combat Hate Crimes

Mongolian flag

The Mongolian government is set to introduce a number of reforms to address the prevention of hate crimes in the country.

In 2012, the National Human Rights Commission reported that almost 80 percent of Mongolians surveyed who self-identified as LGBT had experienced some form of human rights abuse in the previous three years.

Hate crimes in Mongolia received international attention in 2011 when nationalist groups were responsible for numerous attacks against the country’s LGBTI and foreign migrant communities.

Speaking to Al Jazeera following the February 2014 rape of a gay man by homophobic nationalists, a civil rights activist who asked the news outlet to not be named, said:

“We are not sure whether later [the victim] was murdered - or whether he killed himself.”

Police had at first refused to register the sexual assault as a hate crime as male-to-male rape is not considered a crime in Mongolia.

Announced in May, the proposed reforms include a review of the provision for anti-discrimination in the country's criminal code. The Ministry of Justice has removed specific hate-oriented provisions from the draft law.  According to Anaraa Nyamdorj, executive director of Mongolia’s LGBT Centre, more generalized references to “discrimination” will mean that Mongolia “could very well be one of the first countries in the world to criminalize the very concept of discrimination almost entirely.”

Anaraa also recognises that the more generalized proposed law could be seen as a threat to free speech:

"It runs the risk of being seen in a negative light - people can't even say what they want to because then it will be considered discrimination. Then if it's discrimination, it's a crime, so I can't even fully express myself."

According to Bataa Bayaraa, head of the Mongolian National Human Rights Commission's Complaints and Inquiry Division, the law is likely to be passed following substantive amendments.

However, for Anaraa new anti-discrimination laws cannot come soon enough.  

"We cannot wait for these constitutional amendments to be passed. We need to take whatever we can ... and run with it. Right now, lives are being affected irreversibly."


Trending



Towleroad - Blogged