Comments

  1. jack says

    we lost our REAL fierce advocate last night. one might hope that obama steps up, at least on health care, in recognition of all that kennedy did for his campaign and for the country.

  2. Randy says

    Maybe he didn’t moonwalk, but this is the man who should be honoured with tribute concerts and a movie this year.

    The world has lost a great man. His record is truly one against which all others will be measured, not just as a Senator, but as a human being.

  3. Dennis Carreiro says

    Rest in Peace, Teddy K. Tank you for your years of service to our country…but also to our community. Through it all you were a pillar of strength and a real human being, flawed and imperfect who just wanted to make the world a better place. You will be missed.

  4. says

    As a lifelong Mass. native, I’m absolutely distraught. I only hope we can honor his legacy by passing a comprehensive, meaningful (including a public option) health insurance reform bill. That was his life’s work. Anything less would be a disgrace to all that he’s done.

    Ted Kennedy’s always been fearless – indeed, a truly fierce advocate. Here’s hoping he can inspire the same fearlessness in the Democratic Party today.

  5. jimmyboyo says

    Lucifier

    I know! those bush boys, OY. But their family wasn’t into boot legging, they were nazis and traitors. Grandpa bush laundering and funneling money to the nazis. Grandpa Bush being part of that attempted coup to overthrow the US gov but for a loyal US general who turned stool pidgeon on the coup. It is sickening that the bush clan wasn’t shot for treason.

    Anyway; Teddy one of the first and loudest DEMs to speak out for gay rights

    almost 50 years of fighting for civil rights, health care, etc

  6. donsnyc says

    Thank you Sen. Ted Kennedy.

    The Civil Rights Act of 1964.
    The Voting Rights Act of 1965
    The Cobra Act of 1985. (Ever lost a job and still kept your health insurance for 18 months?)
    The Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990.
    The Family and Medical Leave Act in 1993.
    Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996.

    Rest in Peace. Sen. Ted Kennedy was the voice of the powerless.

  7. elcamino says

    He fought for social justice all his adult life.

    He played a major role in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act and the 1993 Family and Medical Leave Act. Kennedy was one of only 14 senators who voted against the 1996 Defense of Marriage of Act.

    During the attempt by conservatives to pass the 2004 Federal Marriage Amendment constitutionally banning same-sex marriage, Kennedy said from the Senate floor, “We all know what this issue is about. It’s not about how to protect the sanctity of marriage, or how to deal with activist judges.

    It’s about politics and an attempt to drive a wedge between one group of citizens and the rest of the country, solely for partisan advantage … The Constitution has never been used as a tool to entrench currently popular views at the expense of an unpopular minority – and it should not be used that way now.”

    It’s particularly sad that he’s passed just now, at the moment when the GOP are plumbing new depths of political demagoguery and inciting the far right toward ever more belligerent displays in the public square.

  8. Alex says

    Not to be picky, because I agree that we have lost a political giant and a great man…BUT, I think giving Ted Kennedy credit for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965 is a bit of a stretch. He certainly voted for them both, but he wrote neither. He pushed for a poll tax to be removed from the VRA, but that effort failed and he certainly didn’t author the legislation.

    JFK and LBJ are really to be credited for the passage of the Civil Rights Act. Let’s not rewrite history in light of the passing of a political legend.

  9. Freddy says

    Ted Kennedy was a gifted legislator, but exhibited shockingly low standards of personal behavior, even for a Kennedy. As far as I’m concerned, Chappaquiddick alone should have forever banished him from politics; it was only his name and the influence of his family that kept him in play (imagine if that terrible incident had happened twenty years later — he’d have been toast).

    The fewer family dynasties we have in American politics, the better. That means fewer Bushes and, yep, fewer Kennedys.

  10. donsnyc says

    Alex, a little google would do you good. The good senator had major role in the passage of the the Civil Rights Act of 1964 abd tge Voting Rights Act of 1965. He may have not written it but he certainly left his mark on it.

    source: http://www.cnn.com/2009/POLITICS/08/26/ted.kennedy.legacy/

    CNN: That legacy, in addition to popularity among fellow senators, might be the reason why he had major roles in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, the 1990 Americans With Disabilities Act, the 1993 Family and Medical Leave Act and the Kennedy-Hatch law of 1997.

    I could go on and cite more sources but I am not gonna do your work for you.

  11. anon says

    I’m a longtime advocate for term limits. The system must be designed so that no one is irreplaceable. The Kennedys were the direct cause of anti-nepotism laws for presidential staff (which entangled HRC too) just as FDR was directly the cause of presidential term limits. We need to tweak these to prevent wives running on the heels of their husbands (or vice versa) and sons running on the heels of their fathers/mothers. Ted’s death would appear to mark the end of the Kennedy “era” in American politics as I hope they don’t hand the job to his son now.

  12. jimmyboyo says

    freddy

    and Laura bush’s killinmg her boyfriend + shrubs cocain past= should have nixed shrub from gaining office

    reagan rapping a woman should have nixed him

    Huckabee’s son hanging a dog and throwing stones at it while it choked to death should have nixed the huckster

    romney’s driving hundreds of miles on the interstate with a dog in a cage on the roof of his car should have nixed him since the majority of america cares more about pets than they do their fellow men and consider cruelty to animal laws sacrosanct

    need I go on ?

  13. Derrick from Philly says

    Freddy:

    how many of us have such high standards of personal behavior when we are in our teens, twenties, and thirties? It takes many people a while to find purpose in life–especially finding the purpose to fight for justice for other folks. That became Ted Kennedy’s purpose, his goal: government as protector for the most vulnerable in this country.

    I’ll miss you, Senator Kennedy.

  14. John says

    On the whole, Senator Kennedy’s actions throughout the years has saved many more lives than it has harmed. He was a major player in the passage of civil rights legislation in this country. He authored the sanctions against the racist apartheid regime in South Africa. He was instrumental in the passage of the Ryan White CARE Act, the Americans With Disabilities Act, Voting Rights Act, and COBRA.

    Does that excuse Chappaquiddick?

    Kennedy himself has said it does not. But he has also done much more for this country than Larry Craig, Mark Foley, or Jim McGreevey. These are politicians who are defined by their scandals rather than by their accomplishments. If there is a “double standard” at work here, it is because Ted Kennedy has earned it.

  15. jimmyboyo says

    crispy

    LOL

    Ok, webster’s spells it

    raping

    reagan raping a woman who confirmed the account multiple times in interviews and only took offense at it being called date-rape, since she said it happened so quickly there was no time for the date part

    Anyway; yeah…..my poosts are full of typos and spelling mistakes

    😛

  16. nic says

    “Camelot, located no where in particular, can be anywhere.”

    mexicans and blacks will be weeping (profoundly), as will the working poor, the gays, the uninsured and under-insured, and the downtrodden; as well as feminists and all sorts of liberals who believe in justice. we have lost the staunchest ally any of us could have hoped for.

    this is almost like when i lost my dad. i knew it was coming, but i was just not emotionally prepared for it. teddy, you fought the good fight; selfless until the end. go now, teddy, join your brothers and sisters in the everlasting camelot. may god speed. you did not go gentle into that good night.

    “Don’t let it be forgot
    That once there was a spot,
    For one brief, shining moment
    That was known as Camelot.”

  17. Dback says

    True story: I’ve had “Bobby” sitting on my DVR queue for almost a year, and for some reason I was reluctant to watch it–almost as if I was daring the universe or something. I finally watched it Monday night, and this happened 24 hours later. Tragic. And barely a week after the Shriver funeral, too.

    When I turned on Fox last night, the first thing I saw and heard was a reporter discussing the William Kennedy Smith rape trial, and testimony that Ted Kennedy was wandering around the party where the rape occurred drunk and pantless. “Fair and balanced” my ass.

  18. A different Andy says

    Mixed feelings about that family.

    I feel that he did a hatchett job on Hillary. He claimed to support “change” but had no problem when his own family ran for office repeatedly and the fact he served for decades. How is that change? So why is it okay for him, but not for Hillary?

    Also – when he drove into the water with that woman…accidents happen. I get that. But not calling the cops for 10 hours? Really, really bad choice.

    Also – it is easy to be liberal and support affirmative action and low income housing and all that when you live in a priviledged compound in Hyannis.

    I also once read he blocked a wind farm on Cape Cod despite claiming to be pro-environment. But I am not sure if that is true or not.

    Still- I will agree it is the end of an era, and he did give a lot of service to his country.

  19. Stan says

    Although I think the Kennedys are a good family all in all, I tend to agree with “A Different Andy”. These people are supremely rich and priviledged, yet we act like they sacrificed and risked it all for the poor. They didn’t. They had absolutely nothing to lose by giving back, and in my own humble opinion, nothing less should be expected from people who have so much more than others. Yes, they did good work, but I think they should have done no less, given how much they have. I also am a little turned off by how some of these so-called “saviours” always want to change the rules whenever they are concerned. Caroline Kennedy thinking she can just step in and be a senator simply because she was a Kennedy rubbed many the wrong way, and even Teddy thinking the rules in MA should be changed to pick his replacement, also reaked of elitism.

    Yes, they are a good family, but I simply won’t raise them to sainthood for things they had a moral obligation to do and which cost them so little.

  20. nic says

    “cost them little to do so” wtf? his brothers were assassinated for doing their duty, for cripes sake.

    i like to use the analogy of yapping, wiener dogs nipping at good people’s heels. never has this analogy been more applicable than in STAN’s, A DIFFERENT ANDY’s, and “ANON”s case.

    but, what i find most despicable is someone posting garbage under “ANON”. go away coward.

  21. says

    Appropriate that Anon lists the Kennedys and FDR as politicians who brought about term limits. Ted Kennedy (far more than his brothers) and FDR worked tirelessly on behalf of the little guy – often at the expense of corrupt, vested interests. They helped the powerless and infuriated the powerful – to the extent that when those representing the powerful regained power, the passed crap like the 22nd Amendment. Thank God there hadn’t been term limits in 1940. The idea of Wenldel Wilkie or Jim Farley (the likely Democratic candidate) boggles the mind.

  22. richard says

    a list of various positive works in a challenging history — much like observing the manner by which advocacy and activism has been belittled in certain cases by the disruption of cheap technology. someone who stands up — rather than stalks. and the limitations that are embraced while a few do work beyond hate-based grants — it’s a list that’s praiseworthy beyond the irony of braille for visual sculptures with no other signage.

  23. jimmyboyo says

    Anon

    type in “Laura Bush killed boyfriend” and get thousand of hits

    The best of course is SNOPES which debunks myths and posts facts

    http://www.snopes.com/politics/bush/laura.asp

    There is a public police report, she was 17 at the time

    Reagan raped actress Selene Walters

    It was first reported in kitty kelly book, yeah I know = crap….BUT Selene Walters went on and was interviewed by all news outlets and corobarted what Kitty Kelly wrote except she took offense at Kitty kelly calling it “date-rape” She said it happened too quickly to for the “date” part

  24. CKNJ says

    …to all those writing nasty shit about someone that served his country well, what the fuck have YOU dumb pricks done lately that even BEGINS to match up to the service that this man dedicated his life to? Everyone makes mistakes in their lives, and this man owned up to his… and endured vitriol from a mindless string of conservative zombies. Braindead fools like (the aptly named) Lucifer, and the other haters here, are just miserable maggots feeding off the dead carcass of conservative hatism against someone that championed the cause of the downtrodden and less fortunate.

    To a self-confessed imperfect (aren’t we all?), but brilliant politician: THANK you for your service to our community… we could do with more advocates like you on our side.

    R.I.P.

  25. Stan says

    Nobody is diminishing the contributions of the Kennedy family. My point is that if you are born into one of the most powerful and wealthy families in the history of the country, then you might be in a far better position to help the less fortunate without having to really sacrifice your own status.

    It might be corny, but there is some truth to the saying “to whom much is given…blah blah”.

  26. jimmyboyo says

    Oh an on chapaquidic

    Not an excuse, but the evidence points to an accident on a bridge that had no railings, was 1 lane, old and rickety….at night with a DRUNK out of his mind Kenedy on way to the beach to have beach sex with a staffer. He swam to shore and passed out drunk….10 hours later waking sober on the shore it was reported

    The mistakes

    1- drunk and driving
    2- going to have unmarried sex with a staffer on the beach

    3- the cover up denying alcohol , denying relationship, denying on way to beach to have sex and claimed going in opposite direction to ferry

    In the end it is the cover up, though drinking and driving isn’t cool….and sadly a woman lost her life

    He didn’t kill her with intent

    It was an accident

  27. nic says

    SUGARHILL,

    YES! we might ask, “what did the other privileged family (the bushes) do?” while the kennedys were lighting candles, the bushes were blowing them out. then, they cursed the darkness.

    history will be unkind to them.

  28. says

    “My point is that if you are born into one of the most powerful and wealthy families in the history of the country, then you might be in a far better position to help the less fortunate without having to really sacrifice your own status.”

    A couple of them sacrificed more than their status. They sacrificed their lives. Think of all the highly privileged people who do nothing to help those less privileged than themselves. Ted Kennedy spent much of his long political life empathizing with and effectively helping people unlike himself. You can’t say that about too many people in power. His professional accomplishments don’t erase his personal failings, but neither do his personal failings erase–as some here have suggested–his professional accomplishments, which are considerable and lasting.

  29. Bill Perdue says

    Since 1945 the classic liberal equation of government has been Guns n’ Butter. Education and housing for Korea. Medicare and voting rights for genocide in Vietnam. Genocide in Iraq for the minimum wage.

    Robert and Ted Kennedy were on the butter side of the equation, a latter day version of Tiberius and Gaius Gracchus. The Kennedys and Gracchi both wanted to balance the needs of an expanding imperial state with bread and circuses.

    That equation was shattered last fall by the current economic severe economic decline, caused by Clinton programs for NAFTA, deregulation of predatory lenders and draconian cuts in welfare and social services which passed with overwhelming bipartisan Democrat and Republican support.

    The national consensus was replaced by a polarization that ripped through the social fabric, shredding it. Centrism as a policy and the two centrist parties, the Democrats and Republicans may be fatally wounded. (Let’s hope so.)

    Intractable and growing unemployment, an unparalleled, choking economic deficit caused by Democrat programs like the export of union jobs, welfare for the rich, union busting and austerity for working people combined with Obama’s escalation of unwinnable wars for oil make it for improbable, unless things change drastically, that the days of guns and butter will return.

  30. mike says

    Dear Lucifier: kiss my queer ass.

    This death hurts both personally and politically. There has been no greater friend to the LGBT community than Sen. Edward Kennedy. We have lost a great man–a flawed man, to be sure, but one of the greatest of Americans. God bless him.

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