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Brazilian President Rousseff Pulls Distribution of Anti-Homophobia Kits to Schools

Under pressure from evangelical groups, Brazil's president Dilma Rousseff has pulled the distribution of kits meant to combat homophobia to schools, the BBC reports:

Rousseff A government spokesman said President Rousseff had viewed the material personally and decided to suspend its distribution.

"She didn't like what she saw," Gilberto Carvalho said.

He said President Rousseff was unhappy with the footage and believed it did not offer an objective picture of homosexuality. The "anti-homophobia kits", as they are known in Brazil, were about to be rolled out by Brazil's ministry of health and the ministry of education. Several members of Brazil's chamber of deputies with strong evangelic Christian beliefs said the sex education packs encouraged homosexual behaviour.

LGBT advocates are angry and demanding she reverse her decision.

In March, during a visit to the country by President Obama, he and Rousseff announced a "special rapporteur" for LGBT rights as part of an ongoing commitment between the U.S. and Brazil.

Under a section labeled "Democracy, Human Rights, Racial Equality and Social Inclusion," the leaders recognized the need to promote respect for the human rights of LGBT people.

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Comments

  1. "Objective view" on homosexuality. Meaning, we failed to teach kids that actually, homosexuality is wrong. Sorry that we implied otherwise.

    Complete cave, and completely showing that Brazilian leadership are not unconditionally against homophobia. How horrible to throw LGBT citizens under the bus in this way. But in a country as dominated societally by Catholic beliefs as Brazil is, it's not surprise whatsoever.

    Supposedly the conservatives in Brazil were threatening to halt all government action until the anti-homophobia was "reviewed" by them and accepted. When the suspension is lifted expected an extremely watered down message.

    Posted by: Francis | May 26, 2011 9:37:41 AM


  2. They were offensively calling it the "gay kit", not anti-homophobia. And I hate to say but I think it was the right decision. From the little of what was shown of the videos they had no direction and I think they would only create more doubts and more hate.

    Posted by: Syrax | May 26, 2011 10:03:59 AM


  3. I'm brazilian and I think it's not a bad thing what happened.
    I'm very frustrated, like everyone else, of course.

    But still, this discussion was one step ahead.

    While some parts of the world are discussing about death penalty for gays, or laws that teachers cannot say anything about homossexuality in class, i think the government forced a diferent level of discussion.

    I saw the video and they were very radical. Maybe it was a good idea to reformulate. Make something more educational and less explicit.

    at least the discussion was everywhere. and that was a good thing. More visibility is always better.

    The fight continuous...

    Posted by: Daniel | May 26, 2011 1:39:09 PM


  4. Well, at least the suspension is said to be temporary to explore the best way to institute this anti-homophobia program. Hopefully it's done with the strong message that being anti-gay is wrong, no wavering or cross messaging. And it is good that the discussion is out there and the government at least did make a strong stand against homophobia. Now they have to cross the finishing line.

    Posted by: Francis | May 26, 2011 1:45:36 PM


  5. I've seen straight television, movies, and porn that's out their and I'm not even tempted to be straight. Propaganda, yeah, right.

    Posted by: Ray | May 26, 2011 2:30:49 PM


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