Gay Man Attacked on NYC Subway; Onlookers Do Nothing

A 23-year-old gay man and his partner were attacked on the No.2 train in NYC on Monday night, the NY Daily News reports:

FrankellyUrena Morel Frankelly and his partner were on a southbound No. 2 train Monday night when a woman took a picture of them eating and her friend called them names.

“Why you taking a picture?” the victim asked.

“Feed you face, f—–" the suspect shouted back. Another woman with her chimed in, apparently asking the partner: “Why you with that f—–?”

Following the exchange, Frankelly was attacked (a man joined the two women) and repeatedly punched, the paper adds. Frankelly's eye was cut and swollen shut.

His partner said nobody came to their aid: “Everyone was watching — no one helped us. That was a very scary situation for us…Right now we’d just prefer to be alone.”

The NYPD has launched a hate crime investigation, the NY Post reports.

(image via NY Daily News)

Comments

  1. Chris in Irvine says

    I’m not sure if there are”different” types of people riding the subway but weren’t we “happy” about two days ago that in another NYC subway a gay man was cheered on when he confronted an anti-gay preacher?

    Obviously what people were cheering on then was that someone confronted the preacher to shut up, not because they were gay friendly. Or maybe some of them were, but this report above shows something different as nobody helped this couple or even took pictures of the perpetrators for the police report

  2. Stefan says

    Waiting for the inevitable troll post about how if the gay men were more manly they would have physically attacked their aggressors. Or how the partner should have intervened more. But none of us were there and we don’t know really that much about how this all played out. We simply know someone was beaten because he was gay. It’s really unfortunate. I hope the victim recovers.

  3. Fensox says

    @Chris, watch that video again, that “cheered” guy gets nothing accomplished, the other dude keeps preaching the entire time. He had zero effect.

    I want to know how late this was. Monday night holiday in the Bronx at like 1AM would be unsurprising.

  4. AlphaTom says

    The NY Post story reports that this happened at 6 p.m. and on the Upper West Side. Not sure how long the attack took place, but they were able to escape at 96th Street. I feel uncomfortable taking the subway very late, but this happened at 6 p.m. Granted it was a holiday, but it wasn’t like it was St. Patrick’s Day when the subway is full of rowdy drunks.

  5. Dan E says

    According to the article, a total of six people attacked him. I’m not sure what fantasy world everyone is living in wherein a lone vigilante throws himself (or herself) into the middle of a fight involving 8 people (if you include the victim and his boyfriend) on a crowded New York City subway, but I think everyone who wasn’t there should probably be a touch less judgmental about people not jumping into the fray to help….

  6. Mary says

    My Mom should have been there. She’d have definitely helped him out. As a NYC schoolteacher she was famous for breaking up fights with almost no thought to her own physical safety. Although she’s not especially pro-gay z(or anti-gay)her likely words to the attackers would be something like “You’re calling him a f_____? He’s TWICE the man you are!”

  7. For Whom the Bell Towles says

    Headline writer Andy Towle encourages gay subway riders to get involved in other peoples’ fracases; denies responsibility for ensuing deaths. Film at 11.

  8. MIke says

    I can only imagine how this comment section would read if this had happened on MARTA or somewhere else in the South. It’s telling how all of NYC doesn’t get lumped into a homophobic bucket. The reality is that this sort of thing happens in blue states & red states, in big cities, small towns and rural areas all across America.

  9. Mary says

    You have a point, “Bell.” But then how will people every learn not to pull crap like this if no one gets involved and stops them? It’s a hard call to make, I know. Several times when trying to break up fights, my Mom was kept safe by a bystander student breaking up the fight because he was afraid for HER safety rather than that of the two fighting students.

  10. 30 Years on the Subway, Zero Fights says

    …a woman took a picture of them eating and her friend called them names.

    “Why you taking a picture?” the victim asked.

    An argument erupted, …

    STOP RIGHT THERE. I’ve seen it written here by others, but you’re taking your life in your hand when you talk to strangers on the subway in NY, particularly if they show signs of aggression. And when you read “An argument erupted…” there are a lot of details left out about who called whom what. I’m sorry that this young man got verbally abusedn and physically attacked, but there is not really enough information to determine whether he played a role in the escalation of the incident. Again, NEVER engage with aggressive strangers on the subway, because you never know when (continue reading)….

    “….and the two women, joined by three others plus a man, attacked Frankelly, police said. His partner tried to intervene, but the victim was repeatedly punched.

    The victim’s left eye was swollen shut, with a cut above the socket. He was treated at St. Luke’s Hospital. Frankelly’s partner tried to intervene, but the victim was repeatedly punched. His partner said, “Everyone was watching — no one helped us. That was a very scary situation for us.”

    He refused comment.

    “Everyone was watching — no one helped us. That was a very scary situation for us,” the partner said.

    AGAIN, I’m really, truly sorry that the young man was physically injured, but I don’t think that I would have waded into a fight to try to save him from his own fresh (or foul) mouth.

    I have seen people get punched on a subway train for accidentally brushing up against another person, and have been other people get stabbed for reacting aggressively. The subway is not a place to be showing your machísmo, unless you’re looking for trouble.

    You wanna take my picture on the subway, go right ahead. I’m ready for my closeup. But I’m not going to get involved in a fight because some kid doesn’t know how to stay out of trouble.

  11. Gregoire says

    I wouldn’t have jumped in. I would gotten myself killed and would have made the situation worse. It’s that simple. However I would have tried every effort to get the attention of the subway operator. There’s only so much a person can do.

  12. ratbastard says

    I’m glad the guy and his partner/friend are OK. Folks…it’s train going to and from the South Bronx and Harlem. You just ‘look’ at somebody the ‘wrong’ way, and they’ll be a fight. You accidently bump into somebody or smile, they’ll be a fight. Chicks are just as bad if not worse than dudes.

  13. ratbastard says

    @GREGOIRE,

    A an engineer on a #2 isn’t going to do jack sh*t, and I don’t blame him/her. Lucky if they call in a fight to transit police. Lucky more-so if police are near-by and respond quickly.

  14. Bill says

    @Mike: People only ignore your comment because they don’t have a witty response to it. You’re so right. Anytime this happens outside of other people’s bubbles, they dismiss it as sh*t Southerners do, or the cost of living in a hick state. Aside from a couple thinly veiled racists, when this happens in their own back yard, people are quick to change how they respond. If it happened in Atlanta, it would be because that’s how everyone in the South behaves. In NY, it’s a certain train in a certain ‘hood, and everyone offers up advice about subway etiquette. The ignorance is astounding.

  15. 30 Years on the Subway, Zero Fights says

    @BillyMike:

    I’ve never seen a person attacked on the subway for being gay. But I’ve seen a few fights break out because of stupidity. That’s the difference (for a gay man) in the South Bronx and East Texas, getting attacked for being stupid versus getting attacked for being gay. That and the lack of subways.

  16. Francis says

    The answer is, that there needs to be security on every train in NYC. NYC has long had this “protect your own blood” type mentality when it comes to these subway situations. You’re expected to protect yourself and handle your own business. But no-one should be forced into situations like this.

    I’m not going to blame the victim here, but he should have known better. You’re taking a train route where violence is a regular occurrence between passengers. You cannot engage with these types of savages. Take the photo, don’t get too defensive, ignore them as much as you can afterward, and make sure you take photos of the thugs and call police afterward.

    Train rides in the Northeast (NYC, Philly, Baltimore, etc.) are rough business. Because there are so many different cultures cramped together and not all of these cultures get along. Be smart and know your surroundings. But these incidents will definitely be cut down dramatically if security were placed on these trains!

    My heart goes out to Urena. I hope he fully recovers physically and especially mentally.

  17. ratbastard says

    @Bill,

    I always attempt to defend others like the south as a region and white southerners when I think they’re unfairly stigmatized. But in this case, what I posted is the truth and my observations of subway etiquette in certain areas [‘hoods if you want to use that word] is to the point and spot-on. The possibilities for unpleasant, even dangerous situations occurring differs dramatically on average,depending on your immediate environment, your fellow passengers, the ‘hoods’ you’re traveling through,to, or from,etc.

  18. ratbastard says

    @Francis,

    It’s impossible to place armed police on all trains and buses. People in especially certain neighborhoods just need to be very aware of their environment and people around them and be ready for anything. Not a pleasant way to live day in and day out, but until the sub-culture of some people [I’m not singling out a specific ‘race’ so don’t get your panties in a bunch] and of some ‘hoods’ changes for the better, this is the way it is.

    @30 years on the subway,zero fights,

    You’ve led a charmed life. I agree fights are actually rare, but they do happens, and I’ve certainly witnessed them. I’ve also witnessed so-called homophobic or anti-gay behavior directed at usually guys who’re stereo-typically gay looking and acting.

  19. Francis says

    Um, the facts of the situation are, this type of violence is pretty unique to NYC and other Northeast cities, where there are generally young, out-of-control youth who are ready to pick a fight with anyone on train rides. To say this is representative of NYC as a whole is completely ridiculous. NYC has a low hate crime rate in comparison to the percentage of gays within the city, and in fact, one of the lowest percentages among big cities.

    This is about homophobia, of course, but then again, most gay men don’t get attacked on train rides in NYC. Anyone who knows NYC knows exactly what this is about.

  20. Francis says

    Um, the facts of the situation are, this type of violence is pretty unique to NYC and other Northeast cities, where there are generally young, out-of-control youth who are ready to pick a fight with anyone on train rides. To say this is representative of NYC as a whole is completely ridiculous. NYC has a low hate crime rate in comparison to the percentage of gays within the city, and in fact, one of the lowest percentages among big cities.

    This is about homophobia, of course, but then again, most gay men don’t get attacked on train rides in NYC. Anyone who knows NYC knows exactly what this is about.

  21. 30 Years on the Subway, Zero Fights says

    @RatBastard: Re ‘hoods, an anecdote, not a contradiction. The last fight I saw on the subway was about 5 years ago, a northbound 6-Train, 77th and Lex, a winter Sunday afternoon, smack in the middle of one of the wealthiest zip codes in the US. A crowded train. Suddenly a loud crack, the sound of fist meeting skull. And the entire car was like one of those nature shows showing a huge school of fish swimming together and then suddenly changing direction. The train car cleared in about 5 seconds, and left the station empty. No one intervened, no one stuck around to get involved. Obviously, a northbound 6-train is what it is. But a fight can happen anywhere. Sometimes discretion is the better part of valor, and you go on to fight the fight another day.

    And for what it’s worth, I grew up in East Texas, and have lived my adult life in Manhattan. While I might feel safer overall in East Texas, in my experience there’s a lot less chance of being attacked for being gay in Manhattan than in some dueling banjos podunk backwater. Like you said, it’s a matter of knowing your surroundings.

  22. Francis says

    Rat, I don’t think it’s impossible to have just one security guard on trains, at least the stations where crime exists more readily. It will take away from the force on the streets but there are areas in NYC that don’t need as much police protection. There are some that do. It’s an expense worth taking. These persons don’t even have to be police, just trained security. Trained guards. That is *the* only way these incidents will stop occurring.

  23. Bill says

    @Ratbastard: I understand what you’re saying. My point was how the narrative changes, based on the bubble. Outside of NYC, the comments are dismissive, and offensive to an entire region of people. Inside NYC, it’s easy for those same people to break the situation down, instead of shrugging it off as a way of life. I don’t expect people who don’t leave their bubble to understand, but I seem to be unable to make the effort anyway.

  24. Duration & Convexity says

    I agree with Jordan. This site, more than any other gay blog, has a ‘blame the gay’ mentality in almost every thread. I mean, a hetero bigot could literally blow up a gay bar and say “die in hell f*gs” and I swear somehow, many of you would turn it into a “well, if they gays wouldn’t go to bars, these things wouldn’t happen”
    I think towleroad is a lost cause personally, and the many posters who left couples with the trolls who invaded proves how other gay blogs are far more stimulating and reasonable to frequent.

  25. USC Trojans Fan says

    I feel like Ratbastard/Rick make 99% of the comments on here. Anyone else get that impression?

    That this story somehow turned into a “gay guy had it coming for talking back to the people harassing him for being gay” is one of those ‘only on towleroad’ moments. Brought to you by Rick/Ratbastard.

  26. ratbastard says

    @DURATION & CONVEXITY,

    There’s a lot of trolling on TR, and no, I’m not one of them. I wouldn’t take most of the more outrageous posts at face value, my friend.

    As far as ‘hate’ crimes are concerned, truth is unfortunately many are faked. It’s the boy who cried wolf syndrome. Most people don’t like being scammed multiple times.

  27. Livin' For the City says

    @Duration: That kind of hyperbole really adds nuance to the site. And instead of blaming the victim, you’re blaming the smart ones.

    None of us wants to see a young gay couple be harrassed and attacked. And all of us want to see the people who did it arrested and charged and punished.

    But as a practical matter, it cannot be repeated too often that you have to: 1) know your surroundings; and 2) pick your battles. Let the ghetto rats flap their gums. It’s not worth getting knifed just to flex our rainbow pride a little. It’s all about risk assessment.

    Fighting unjust laws is one thing. Fighting a psychotic hoochie mama is quite another.

  28. ratbastard says

    @USC TROJANS FAN,

    You are sadly wrong,my friend. And I have no idea who Rick is. Rick is not me, i.e. ratbastard.

    I’ve responded multiple time s on this thread because it’s a subject matter I’m very familiar with.

  29. Bamaman says

    In the stories where gay men are beat up and didn’t react, the comments all say how gay men are weak and how pathetic it is the gay people didn’t defend themselves.
    In a story about a gay person standing up and speaking up for himself, and defending himself, the comments all say how the gay man is stupid for defending himself.
    Fascinating stuff y’all. I mean the trolls aren’t even trying to be consistent. Just basically throwing any spin out there that will ultimately put the gay individual in the blame seat.

  30. Duration & Convexity says

    @ Bamaman
    Praise you for being so dang observant and pointing out what some of us attempted to above! it’s also why I think towleroad is going to shambles while other gay sites are thriving. The no login deal enables people to post with multiple handles and creates this atmosphere where the gay party is somehow always at fault.

  31. Duration & Convexity says

    @Ratbastard (perfect screename btw. Very fitting)
    that no matter how gruesome the attack, your reaction to every anti gay attack is to always throw out your canned meme about “well, many anti gay attacks are fake” proves how old, bitter, jaded, and self hating you are. I mean consider your life. You’re up there in age, and your daily kicks are of coming on a gay site and actively ATTEMPTING to play devil’s advocate in every story, while dismissing notions of homophobia. THAT’S your life. LoL, and not only in real life, but in virtual world, you don’t have any friends or allies of sorts. Don’t you ever sit back and go…I’m going to die soon; this is pathetic.
    A majority of us feel sorry for you. That you don’t feel sorry for yourself is the narrative of your posts.

  32. Towle Troll says

    It’s stupid to say that “Rick” speaks for everyone on the site. I see a lot of people confronting and opposing his idiocy.

    And if you actually read the comments, nobody’s blaming anyone. But it seems like people who have maybe lived a little longer, and maybe have a little more actual experience understand.

    Comment above talked about ‘risk assessment’, and that’s dead on. Risk assesment and risk/reward assesment.

    Standing up for yourself isn’t the same thing as mouthing off foolishly in a dangerous situation. We have to be honest with ourselves about this.

  33. ratbastard says

    DURATION & CONVEXITY is the Toronto troll who goes by Lil’ Kiwi and one thousand other names. If I’m wrong, he/she is doing an excellent imitation. One of Lil’ K’s classic techniques to to be very nasty and personal in his attacks He also uses the word ‘y’all’ very often. Apparently he thinks this will enthrall him to typical Americans, though ‘y’all’ is a regional southern ism.

  34. Duration & Convexity says

    But…Psst~ gotta be honest rat bastard, knowing how gays, gay rights, the gay community, gay movements is something you really resent and stresses you out kinda sorta makes me happy knowing you expose yourself to that stress every single day and hour on here. Stress is scientifically proven to cause cancer. And some people sheer existence on our planet is a cancer. Just sayin’

  35. You gotta be kidding says

    Anyone who has written off TrollRoad as a lost cause is welcome to visit Joe My God.

    It’s nothing but unicorns and bunnies and princess sparkle ponies all day over there.

  36. Firestorm says

    It’s funny that some people will clap their hands in applause for us, but they won’t actually lift a finger to help us when in need.

    Kitty Genovese is spinning in her grave right now.

  37. Rich says

    Thanks, Firestorm for the Kitty Genovese reference. I’m a native New Yorker and the dark side of not minding our neighbors’ business is that we tend not to get involved. I daresay we’re hardwired that way.

    I don’t recall if eating on the New York subways is explicitly prohibited, but it does represent a threat to the grooming standards of nearby passengers. If instead of using the f___ word, the aggressors had gone for the n____ word (or the motherf word), we wouldn’t be discussing the incident in this blog.

  38. Derrick says

    The whole “know your surroundings, don’t start stuff with people” sounds a lot like that “women wouldn’t get raped if they didn’t go out alone or at night” arguments. Violence is never the answer and I think the victim getting upset that some complete stranger was taking a picture of them is totally justified. The attack that followed was not.

  39. Me says

    Strangers may not have stepped in, but I am sure for that most it had nothing to do with the fact the victim was gay. Every public transit rider tries to steer clear of the frequent nonsense that occurs. Yes, at some point, people should step in, and I suspect a lot of people were internally freaking out about what to do, but to throw yourself into a group of 6 people committing an assault? That takes an exceptional person.

  40. ratbastard says

    Much of what is commonly accepted about what happened with Kitty Genovese is actually urban myth. In fact, many people did call police contrary to popular belief. And this poor woman, Ms. Genovese, was an occasional prostitute and commotion at her place apparently wasn’t uncommon.

    http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/fulfillment-any-age/201112/the-top-10-psychology-myths

    I agree with Derrick, it’s absolutely rude to snap a pic of someone blatantly or not. And, yes, I’d be BS like most people. That said, it doesn’t surprise me under the circumstances that it escalated. Those [censored B-word] were itching for a fight.

  41. Details says

    Why exactly should strangers have stepped in? Because they were gay? It sounds like there was some kind of argument that both sides participated in…and then it escalated. Not for nothin’ but many people (gays included) think they can “say” anything to you…have as nasty a tone as they want and you have to just suck it up and “deal”. Hate to say it, but you have no idea what went down on that train or what exchange went down….all I’m sayin’…

  42. Rawn says

    @Francis “Train rides in the Northeast (NYC, Philly, Baltimore, etc.) are rough business.”

    I’ve been riding those trains for over 25 years, (to and from the Bronx on the 2 as well), and I have no idea why all your posts make it sound like you take your life in your hands riding them.

    Something obviously frightened you, but you need to get over it and stop scaring other people.

  43. Wet Dog says

    Reading through these comments, it’s pretty easy to see that some people get it. And some don’t.

    A subway car is no place to assert your identity. A subway car is about getting from here to there, preferably without getting the $hit beat out of you. And the reality, the muthuh-fuggin’ REALITY is that a subway car is a pretty easy place to get the $hit beat out of you for a whole lot of reasons, including but not limited to being conspicuously homosexual.

    I remember being on a crowded subway car in winter one time when it had been raining, and the smell of wet wool was thick. These two women got on the car in a foul mood, and started making faces and complaining about the smell. The one standing beside me said something to the effect that “These white people make me SICK, getting on here smelling like wet dogs!” My coat was damp, I’m white enough, and in all likelihood she was talking about me. Was this the time to give here a lecture on racial tolerance and good manners? Was it the time for me to get in her face about my right to wear wet wool in peace? Was it worth escalating the situation in the name of civility? Or was it wiser to try to create a little space, ignore the comments, overlook the insult, and get home safely. I chose the latter and never looked back.

    Equating the ‘know your surroundings’ advice with the blaming the victim is a false and foolish argument. No one here here would agree that a woman DESERVES to be raped because of the way she’s dressed. But trying to identify factors that put her in danger and avoid a horrible recurrence is not blaming her.

    In the same vein, no one thinks that a person deserves to be mugged because they’re listening to their iPod. And advising them that doing so puts them at risk is not blaming them.

    Same with subway divas. Nobody argues that this young man and his boyfriend deserved to be accosted or attacked. But getting into a verbal altercation with a gang of women who are itching for a fight is dangerous. If you have to fight to protect yourself, then fight. But do everything you can to prevent things from getting to that point. Even if I don’t want to see him get injured, it doesn’t sound at all like this guy did everything he could to avoid confrontation. I hope he never faces that situation again.

    No one wants to see a young gay person get injured, or God forbid killed. Be Proud, but be smart. Or at least a little smarter. That’s all.

  44. David Hearne says

    Chris – Perhaps the people cheering in the other video were simply trying to egg on a fight.

    Stefan – If they had been armed, it wouldn’t matter how “manly” they were.

  45. David Hearne says

    Alpha –

    I have seen similar attacks on public transit in San Francisco. My boyfriend went to defend the gay guy being hit, and the apes in the back said, “You can’t hit him, he’s a minor.” Seriously. BF collared the “minor” and the guy jumped out the rear window when the bus stopped.

  46. David Hearne says

    Wet Dog –

    And the point of law abiding people being armed is that criminals should never know whether you are or aren’t armed. Trust me that this would not happen on a bus around here. Florida has 18 million people and 1 million concealed carry permits. So a criminal has a 1 in 18 chance of attacking someone who will kill him.

  47. Wet Dog says

    @David Hearne: Save your Tea Party nonsense for someone else. Your handgun would be worthless with a knife stuck in your jugular vein.

    This situation didn’t call for a gun. Just a little more common sense and a little bit thicker skin.

  48. David Hearne says

    @ Wet Dog

    You talk like a fool. This was exactly the scenario in which a gun was called for. This situation was the law of the jungle. Contrary to what they might have taught you in public school, you have a right to say anything you want and it doesn’t give someone else the right to shut you up simply because they are bigger, crazier, or more experienced in gorilla behavior than you are.

  49. David Hearne says

    GEB – You might as well we talking to a wall as to challenge some of the followers around here. If a gay person is killed in Montgomery, it’s typical. If it happens ten times as often in NYC or SF it’s an anomaly.

    The simple fact is that whether you are talking about Atlanta, Houston, or Orlando and whether you are talking about race, ethnicity, or orientation Southerners simple don’t experience the level of overt hostility and just plain bad manners that you see in northern cities.

  50. Rodney Wollam says

    To me, it sounds like the two women knew the guy they assaulted. The use of the word “THAT” to his partner (of all people, him being gay as well) suggests not a hate crime, but a simple assault.

  51. Francis says

    Rawn—-it’s because many rides at night are very much dangerous and incidents like this happen regularly against innocent people. That’s just how it is. It doesn’t mean it’s a death sentence, but it’s dangerous.

    This thread has predictably degraded into crap, but I will say, I agree with both sides of the “don’t blame him vs be aware of your surroundings” conversation. Like I said earlier, you have to know your surroundings and know the people you’re dealing with. If you feel under threat like this when there are more than a handful of people involved, the worst thing to do is confront the situation head on because that’s escalating a manner you likely can’t control.

    With that being said, it certainly isn’t Urena’s fault for getting upset at his photo being taken and he being harassed. He did what most people would do. If someone was snapping my photo without my permission I’d probably do the same thing. It’s not his fault in the slightest. It takes a whole lot to not react in such a way. Ultimately, savages will be savages.

    Rodney, I was thinking the same thing, but it’s still a hate crime given the nature of the crime. It’s interesting they didn’t attack Urena’s partner but then again, that very well could be because it was Urena who spoke up and not his partner. In any case, it’s a hate crime and these thugs need to be captured. Hopefully some of the witnesses on the train with Urena will give statements.

  52. Francis says

    Rawn—-it’s because many rides at night are very much dangerous and incidents like this happen regularly against innocent people. That’s just how it is. It doesn’t mean it’s a death sentence, but it’s dangerous.

    This thread has predictably degraded into crap, but I will say, I agree with both sides of the “don’t blame him vs be aware of your surroundings” conversation. Like I said earlier, you have to know your surroundings and know the people you’re dealing with. If you feel under threat like this when there are more than a handful of people involved, the worst thing to do is confront the situation head on because that’s escalating a manner you likely can’t control.

    With that being said, it certainly isn’t Urena’s fault for getting upset at his photo being taken and he being harassed. He did what most people would do. If someone was snapping my photo without my permission I’d probably do the same thing. It’s not his fault in the slightest. It takes a whole lot to not react in such a way. Ultimately, savages will be savages.

    Rodney, I was thinking the same thing, but it’s still a hate crime given the nature of the crime. It’s interesting they didn’t attack Urena’s partner but then again, that very well could be because it was Urena who spoke up and not his partner. In any case, it’s a hate crime and these thugs need to be captured. Hopefully some of the witnesses on the train with Urena will give statements.

  53. DannyEastVillage says

    The #2 comes down through some of the most, uh, socially backward parts of the Bronx. I’m sorry to say that–but it’s true. I worked up there for years and know the territory. It’s largely West Indian folks. And as we know, in the main, West Indian people are unwilling to be our friends yet–at least, not publicly.

  54. Rodney Wollam says

    Addendum @ Francis
    If the women attacked him because he they just personally disliked him or because he talked back to them, that’s not a hate crime, even if he happens to be gay. If they attacked him for solely being gay, why did they leave his partner alone? The first is assault. The second is a hate crime.

    Finally, if they attacked him for all of the above reasons, I have no idea what the charge would be.

  55. Wet Dog says

    @David: “Contrary to what they might have taught you in public school, you have a right to say anything you want and it doesn’t give someone else the right to shut you up simply because they are bigger, crazier, or more experienced in gorilla behavior than you are.”

    How old are you? Seriously…how old? 19?

    Being in the right doesn’t keep you alive, or even necessarily safe. Plenty of dead pedestrians in crosswalks as evidence of that.

    I’d much rather be smart and alive than right and dead.

  56. Billy Crytical says

    Black women are very angry they have dark skin, afro-textured hair, and African facial features instead of European features. They are ready to boil over any minute for any reason.

  57. andrew says

    @Ratbastard: You have slandered the name of Kitty Genovese murdered in 1964 by a mutant named Moseley, who remains in prison to this day and hopefully he will die in prison. Kitty Genovese was no prostitute as you slander. She was a lesbian earning her living as a bar manager. She was returning home to the apartment she shared with her partner at about 3:00 AM when stabbed to death by the mutant Moseley. There are conflicting stories about how many people were aware of her attack and did nothing. The bottom line is that no one came to her aid. That behavior is now called the Genovese Syndrome.

  58. tiko says

    I can understand why some people wouldn’t want to get involved in a multi-person brawl but someone could have either discreetly snapped a picture of the perp. from their cell phone for police or pressed the emergency call button to alert the driver. Instead, people look away and want no part. I ride the subways every day in Boston and rode the subways every day in NY for many years and have had a few people threaten me with violence over the years. And – each time, people just looked away. No one wanted to get involved. Irrelevant or not the truth is that ALL of the aggressive people that wanted to F me up because I accidently bumped into them or whatever were young black men. More bad S*** goes down when you are riding on subway cars that go through crap neighborhoods. It sucks but true. I’m at the point where I will just either move to a place where I can walk to work or drive in from the suburbs unless they get transit police on all the cars.

Leave A Reply