Comments

  1. ratbastard says

    What kind of conspiracy do they think exists? To all the adults on here: you and me have a pretty good idea of what went down. And why the federal justice department? I highly doubt this involves any traditional civil rights violation as we Americans tend to think of civil rights violations [discrimination against black folks]. There are whole counties in Mississippi with majority black populations, complete with their own corrupt black politicians. Same with towns and cities. Maybe a civil rights violation against a gay man. But I think this was a simple situation where something went terribly wrong. His manner of death suggests it was personal and involved extreme hate or anger.

    Families of people killed and murdered a lot of times refuse to deal with reality. They refuse to accept that their loved one was killed or murdered for mundane reasons. It’s sad.

  2. JDB says

    “Reeds friends have claimed he was defending himself from unwanted sexual advances.”

    So why, exactly, did that require him to be tortured to death, dragged, and burned?

    If memory serves, these are the sorts of injuries that were inflicted upon Matthew Shephard.

    The family (rightly) is outraged because there wounds don’t match with the story being given about his death by the alleged killer. They’re also likely outraged because flirting (i.e. “unwanted sexual advances”) isn’t cause for murder. I’m guessing the family believes this to be a homophobic attack by multiple persons, and since local prosecutors aren’t treating it as such, they have every right to appeal to the Justice Dept. under the hate crimes bill that was passed during Obama’s first term.

    And Rat, black people aren’t the only people with civil rights, nor do many Americans share your definition of “civil rights violations” as discrimination against black folks. As an “adult” on here, I’d like to hear what exactly you think I think went down. I guarantee you’ve got it wrong.

  3. says

    I agree with the family members…it just doesn’t add up. Even if Reed is charged with strangulation, he did much more than just strangulation…he beat and burned Marco, or at least desecrated the body after death (which if it’s not a crime, it should be). The federal government needs to get involved…

  4. says

    Fact is people the state can only charge someone with what is proven have they proven the man charged killed him yes why tho has not yet been proven. Plenty of crimes involve beatings, Burnings, and other torturous acts but are not hate crimes unless you can prove he had the intent to commit the crime based on the sexuality of the victim then its not a hate crime and sadly yes the idea that flerting occurred does matter as it makes the difference between 1st and 2nd degree murder if he did not plan on killing him before the flirting its 2nd degree murder which would be 20 to life minimum if either flirting did not occur or he killed him a considerably long time after the flirting occurred then its 1st degree which is either life not parole or death by injection.

  5. says

    Fact is people the state can only charge someone with what is proven have they proven the man charged killed him yes why tho has not yet been proven. Plenty of crimes involve beatings, Burnings, and other torturous acts but are not hate crimes unless you can prove he had the intent to commit the crime based on the sexuality of the victim then its not a hate crime and sadly yes the idea that flerting occurred does matter as it makes the difference between 1st and 2nd degree murder if he did not plan on killing him before the flirting its 2nd degree murder which would be 20 to life minimum if either flirting did not occur or he killed him a considerably long time after the flirting occurred then its 1st degree which is either life not parole or death by injection.

  6. ratbastard says

    Strangulation is a very intimate way of murdering someone. It’s generally a crime of passion, usually involving people who were intimate [not necessarily sexual, just very close] with each other, and felt some kind of betrayal , or split. Then, in Mr. McMillian’s case, there’s outrageous over-kill. It’s unlikely this was just some random crime, and very likely Mr. McMillian and his murder[s] knew each other, and were friendly. Just my 2 cents.

    What makes this crime so bad is the over-kill. Mr. McMillian wasn’t just shot in the head or quickly killed in some other fashion, he was tortured and his remains were brutalized.

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