Comments

  1. Jack M says

    That’s really not a good idea. If someone with a bad heart experiences that and has a heart attack, or someone falls and hurts temselves as a result, the people responsible for the ad could be held liable. Good intentions, but it’s a lawsuit in the making.

  2. Eric says

    Those aren’t real people. It’s advertising people! There are very few agencies that can use non union talent. Almost every single ad you see with “real people” is fake. (though they are actual real people. not robots)

  3. AJ says

    When I was in High School we had an EMT come in and show slides to us in Driver’s Ed class. I have been so terrified to EVER drive drunk. I only did it once for a few blocks and I cried the whole time. Moral of the story: Accident victim slides = EFFECTIVE

  4. ratbastard says

    Maybe if they tightened up some of their liquor laws, there’d be less of a problem with alcohol induced crime problems. It’s a common site in England to see teens and young adults publicly drinking open containers of beer and it’s perfectly legal. A law was only fairly recently passed that bans drinking alcohol openly on the London Underground [subway]. But it still actually occurs and isn’t strongly enforced. Bars now have the right to be open 24/7 [not all of themselves avail themselves, but some do] serving alcohol. Liquor and beer can be brought pretty much 24hrs a day at supermarkets, 7 days a week.

  5. deisit says

    While what you are saying might be true, ratbastard, the difference with the US is that the vast majority of people in the UK, and especially in London use public transportation when going out, so there is less of a chance of drunk driving. I studied in the US for a while and it always amazed me how taboo drinking was, yet every weekend young underage students would still drink, hiding from their parents. Although I agree that stricter laws might be needed, I think its much better for everyone if people can drink in a pub or bar rather than hiding in a basement.

  6. UFFDA says

    This is an appalling idea. Since I, and most people, don’t drive when drinking I take offence at such a scatter-shot approach. Guilty of peeing doesn’t make you guilty of drunk driving.

  7. jakeinlove says

    I’m not sure if it would get the point across at all at the time of the incident as there is no association with driving or being behind the wheel. It just comes off as a freakish accident from behind the wall that unnecessarily scares the shite out of someone without explaining why.

  8. Charlie says

    This is what they showed me in school:

    This film was so notorious that it was banned. (They showed us “Boys Beware” too.)

    @JimmyPaul: “You know those men are actors. They’re actually washing their hands.” You gave me a good laugh.

  9. David Hearne says

    The real problem in the US is the notion that you either are or aren’t an alcoholic, that alcoholism is an illness that you magically contract or worse that it’s genetic.

    I spent years observing alcohol use and abuse by others and myself. Alcohol abuse is willful misconduct. It is not a disease and you are not a victim. If you like to drink to oblivion, then plan your evening as you would if you were talking LSD or some other drug with a long wearing off time. Make sure you have everything you need at home, or the means to go out via public transportation.

    In short, be an adult.

  10. SayTheTruth says

    Yeah. If someone happened to have a heart condition and suffers a cardiac arrest, will see how the message ends. No fan of this kind of immature stuff but I see how Americans love pranks and the like.

  11. alex says

    AJ: I was in SADD (Students Against Drunk Driving) in high school. Just before prom, we had an outdoor assembly that reenacted a drunk driving crash. The local police and fire department participated. We even had a smashed car. All the SADD members participated as actors. One of us was pronounced “dead” and taken away in a coroner’s van.

    It’s hard to determine how effective something like that is. But, seeing a classmate put into a body bag was pretty chilling.

  12. shawnthesheep says

    David Hearne,

    You can pull any opinion you want out of your ass, but if you want to state it as fact you really should have more to back it up than just your own observations. Researchers have indeed found genetic links that relate to both the prevalence and severity of alcoholism.

    I would tend to trust the experts conducting the The Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) over your anecdotal observations.

  13. ratbastard says

    @deisit,

    I see your points. I agree with you, except for the allowing drinking on the street. And it wouldn’t be a bad idea to limit the hours a person can buy liquor at stores. I’m all for freedom and am not a nanny statist like so many ‘progressives’ on here and in America, but do recognize the abuse liquor is a major source of societal problems and violence.

  14. ratbastard says

    @deisit,

    I see your points. I agree with you, except for the allowing drinking on the street. And it wouldn’t be a bad idea to limit the hours a person can buy liquor at stores. I’m all for freedom and am not a nanny statist like so many ‘progressives’ on here and in America, but do recognize the abuse liquor is a major source of societal problems and violence.

  15. ratbastard says

    @David Hearne,

    “The real problem in the US is the notion that you either are or aren’t an alcoholic, that alcoholism is an illness that you magically contract or worse that it’s genetic.”

    EXCELLENT POINTS.

    I’ve always been irritated by general attitudes on this subject. Even the casual phrase ‘Do you drink’ has underlining negative connotations. I suppose it’s because extremist evangelical Protestantism and equally prudish Calvinist based philosophy [which is just as likely to be ‘progressive’] has had such a powerful influence in American culture down through the centuries. I’m amused when I notice inside liquor stores how uptight so many people are when picking out and buying their booze. It’s like most people act embarrassed or a little ashamed. Except for wine. That’s not an issue since it’s considered cultured and sophisticated. Beer is considered low brow, hard liquor is what you drink to get drunk. This sums up the general attitudes towards alcohol in the U.S. among not everybody, but many.

  16. David Hearne says

    Shawnthesheep –

    Thanks for responding.

    Note that in the introduction to the collaborative whatever you reference, an early reference is to “funding”. Now you know why they have been doing it, you really would want to question their output in addition to their motive. Moreover, who are these people? Are they trying to convince themselves that they are or aren’t Alcoholics (capital A as in AA)?

    What sets alcohol apart from say, an eating disorder, is that eating is essential to living and consuming alcohol is not.

    So while there might be some genetic component to why some people like to get trashed, it’s little more than an excuse in the hands of “substance abuse counselors”.

    I have spend more time listening to the BS of alcoholics and drug abusers than I care to think about. They all belonged to clubs (AA and NA) which told them it wasn’t their fault, that they have a disease. It also told them that they could never consume alcohol, drugs, “mind altering substances” and in Northern California often caffeine and refined sugar and white flour. It said that if they didn’t think they were alcoholics, it was proof that they were alcoholics. If they went out into the world they would DIE! (or go to prison or a nut house). It said that if none of the dire predictions came true or appeared to be coming true then you were in denial. They said that if you go out and limit yourself in how many drinks you have (because nonalcoholics just magically stop at two one supposes) then you are doing “controlled drinking” which in their mind is not the same thing as showing self control.

    Spare me your BS. If you want to tiss away two hours a day at AA meetings in lieu of a life, wear yourself out. Just don’t try to sell other people your BS. The core principle of 12 Step is that God cures you. That would be the same God who thinks you are an abomination if you are gay.

  17. jamal49 says

    Gee, David Hearne, so how’s that white-knuckle sobriety workin out for ya?

    Sorry, dude, but alcoholism is a disease. It is genetic. It’s pretty much a scientific fact.

    Oh, wait. I forgot. You’re a conservative. So, um, facts really don’t mean much to somebody like you.

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