‘Queer Eye’ Guys to Reunite for TV Special

Queereye

Bravo is planning a Queer Eye for the Straight Guy reunion to air next month, Variety reports:

Hosted by Andy Cohen, special will bring back together the “Fab Five”: food and wine connoisseur Ted Allen, grooming guru Kyan Douglas, design doctor Thom Filicia, fashion savant Carson Kressley and culture vulture Jai Rodriguez. The quintet will reflect on the series, reveal behind-the-scenes secrets and discuss how their lives have changed.

Comments

  1. says

    I definitely WON’T be watching this gay minstrel show. But I already gave up on Bravo years ago when it started brokering on stereotypical representations as part of their ratings cash-grab. I hold Bravo, Andy Cohen and their peers largely responsible for the dumbing down of America and the rise of the prevalent and trivial celebrity-obsessed culture that exists.

    Ick.

  2. says

    “stereotypical” people exist. as do archetypical ones 😀

    i think the anger we’re seeing is from the usual insecure homosexuals who are bitterly angry that those “stereotypical gays” don’t live with the constant fear and shame that cripples you boys every day of your sad@ss lives.

    oh well. yay for the special!

  3. Alex N says

    No thank you. They should stay wherever they are. @MRPINKY: “Gay Minstrel Show” sums it up exactly. It was an embarrassment, as is Andy Cohen. I preferred it when gay men were automatically thought to be smart, sensitive, sophisticated and cultivated. We are all now just plain stupid consumerist airheads like our straight peers.

  4. Alex N says

    Dear Little Kiwi,

    I am guessing you relate to the minstrel gay, which is entirely your prerogative. However, sharing an opinion does not necessitate instant knee-jerk hysteria from the minstrel. The minstrel would do best to take five minutes to breathe deeply and focus on the evening’s outfit, and then return to such a forum with a stronger sense of self, thus allowing for less impulsive reactivity.

  5. says

    Dear Alex N, you can’t blame happy gay men who may embody things that stupid people deem to be “stereotypical” for your own insecurities as a gay man.

    They’re enjoying life and don’t care what people think. It’s not their fault you don’t have the orbs and spine to do the same.

    *elegant curtsy*

  6. Michael Vilain says

    While I gave up on Bravo’s shows a long time ago, the first season of QE where they go the concept down was worth watching. And the spin offs with other casts in the UK was also interesting to see what a different designer would do with a space than Tom.

    Most of the hate here sounds like self-hate. Real men laugh when I say “ALL men are size queens”. Now eat your liver and vegetables. Yes, that’s right, I’m your Jewish momma.

  7. says

    and it’s not just those “who relate” who take no issue with, and are not threatened by, what you cowards are calling the “minstrel gay” – you’re just revealing our own insecurity.

    “oh Darn! THOSE kind of gays! they’re the ones i hate because they’re the ones that are being stereotypical and yet STILL have happy lives and live out loud and date and aren’t afraid of being visible!”

    yeah. keep complaining. from a place of anonymity. won’t make the Fab Five’s live worse, won’t make yours better 😀

  8. mikep says

    Geez…so much hate on here! I actually enjoyed the first couple of seasons of QE and might just tune in to see what they’ve been up too.
    As for all the haters on this site…you don’t have to watch if you don’t want too.

  9. says

    @MikeP – it’s textbook. gay men who hate being gay men and who live in fear of what people think about them take extreme issue with happy out and proud gay men who DON’T care what people think about them.

    oh well. 😀

  10. Matt27 says

    @Little Kiwi, that’s one theory. My reason is simply didn’t like the show. (I don’t hate being gay, don’t live in fear of other people’s opinions etc. Sorry.)

  11. says

    Good to know that one can have an opinion on these threads without being attacked for things that have nothing to do with one’s original comments. 😉

    But I’ll indulge you, Little Kiwi…

    I am a 49yo openly gay man of color (and an immigrant) who works in the music industry, primarily with hip-hop artists but also with some of the pop artists who get a lot of blog coverage here. I am: happy; proud of my accomplishments (personally, professionally); comfortable in my own skin; highly opinionated; relatively intelligent; appreciate the full spectrum of gay culture; and can camp it up with the best of them. I am not: self-hating; invisible; stupid; or a coward.

    My opinion stands on Queer Eye, Bravo, Andy Cohen, the dumbing down of our culture. And i choose to not participate in the “culture” perpetuated by it/them… Agree. Disagree. I don’t really care, sweetheart.

  12. says

    Pinky, how nice that your porno blog is almost entirely white dudes, too 😀

    helpful hint: confident secure gay man don’t say any of the nonsense you rambled on about.

    are you on your blog? i didn’t see any 49yo non-white dudes on it 😀

  13. anon says

    I hope it’s not going to be a sad little clip show. The only one that really did any TV afterwards was Ted. Thom got a few commercials out of it. Carson’s reality TV show got canceled. Jai and Kyan didn’t have enough personality to do anything on their own.

  14. Joel V says

    @Matt27, probably to due with the show’s tenth anniversary.

    For all it’s campiness, I really enjoyed the show and appreciate the role it played in increasing visibility and acceptance of GLBT people. I’m looking forward to the reunion.

  15. says

    you complain about “stereotypes” with zero understanding of the reality that something being deemed “stereotypical” does not in any way mean it’s inherently negative.

    as for your “non-anonymity” – you’re 49yo “openly gay man of color” who provided us all with his NSFW mostly-white-dudes porno blog.

    ok sugarpie 😉

  16. Jerry says

    My take is a little different, being that Andy Cohen was more or less directly responsible for cancelling Queer Eye to begin with; this is just a way for Cohen to grab more airtime for himself with a reunion special that wasn’t exactly in high demand featuring five guys who have been more or less idle in the popular awareness since the show was cancelled.

    Cohen has been famewhoring it since well before he ever got his mug in front of the cameras. He’s a slightly upmarket Perez Hilton, for lack of a better analogy.

  17. TX Crew says

    Sassy, flamboyant gays aren’t going anywhere in the gay community. LoL machismo gays will never be the only face of the community. Feminine gay men will always be a staple. Don’t like it? Oh well. I hear NOM has some job openings :)

  18. USC Trojans Fan says

    Mr. Pinky, you work for the hip hop industry and feel you have room to belittle ‘gay culture’? Not surprising. After all, your industry is revolved around bashing otehrsbut taking little accountability. Before you step on a platform and make sweeping generalizations about gay culture (amazing gay culture at that) let’s examine YOUR hip hop culture, shall we? the same one that causes gay kids to take loaded guns and blow their own brains out, but because of political correctness society overlooks the blatant homophobia in 99% of hip hop. Misogyny. And fem bashing. Hip hop culture is centered around an unrealistic ideal of machismo masculinity where men have to be a caricature of what a “man” is and anyone who doesn’t fit that is belittled. OF COURSE you’d take issue with queer eye and other elements of flamboyant in your face gay culture. THAT’S YOUR PROBLEM. Not ours.

  19. Alfonso says

    @ USC Trojans Fan… preach it.
    the irony of someone working in the hip hop field schooling gay people on why we shouldn’t like what we like, when so much of hip hop is devoted to flashing monetary pocessions, womans body parts and a fixation with thuggery. but that’s all Mr. Pink knows and he views fabulous gays as a threat to him and his circle.

  20. R.J says

    I love them and always appreciated their fun, kind, ad charming approaching in helping people. I relate to all these en and am always proud to see unapologetically out gay men on t.v.

  21. Duration & Convexity says

    Pageant culture is celebrated by many young woman with 2 million competing a year nationally. Hip hop culture of various ethnic minorities is celebrated as a fabric of the some of the youth, and various segments of different cultures is accepted for what it is, but “fab culture” of our gay community has to constantly be challenged. Skrew that. I’m a stylist, fabulous, love the queer guys show, and generally love the portion of our community that is indeed fabulous. I won’t ever apologize for that or change. This world is a diverse one. Consume it hating others for being different than you and *you’ll* be the one aging yourself.

    Go on fab 5! Can’t wait for the reunion.

  22. Duration & Convexity says

    Pageant culture is celebrated by many young woman with 2 million competing a year nationally. Hip hop culture of various ethnic minorities is celebrated as a fabric of the some of the youth, and various segments of different cultures is accepted for what it is, but “fab culture” of our gay community has to constantly be challenged. Skrew that. I’m a stylist, fabulous, love the queer guys show, and generally love the portion of our community that is indeed fabulous. I won’t ever apologize for that or change. This world is a diverse one. Consume it hating others for being different than you and *you’ll* be the one aging yourself.

    Go on fab 5! Can’t wait for the reunion.

  23. DREW says

    Mr. Pinky:

    When you classify those of us who are fashionistas, effeminate, and not masculine as irrelevant stereotypes that you infer the community need to distance itself from; then no, you are by no means aware of the full spectrum of LGBT, much less appreciative of it. We’re not stereotypes. We’re human. Who exist. And won’t be a fringe isolation to appease you. We may not put on some straight acting pony show in public that you may be accustomed to, but we’re no less worthy of being represented on television when so many different types of people of all backgrounds are consistently displayed on mass media.

    I, and clearly a few others above, identify with some of the Queer eye programming. Gay flamboyance isn’t a myth. For some of us it’s inherent and part of what brings us joy in life, and we’re entitled to see that displayed in mainstream outlets just as you and your hip hop artists get to constantly see images of your like minded peers on mainstream outlets. You seem to think you’re closed minded views are far more noble than they are. You’re referencing people, not things.

  24. Observer says

    Wow. So many judgmental gays. And in all likelihood the hyper masculine crowd who wants to shun and shame any segment of gay culture that is camp.

    Queer eye was an incredibly positive, uplifting, touching show. Bravo’s facebook is constantly drowned with messages by people demanding they put the show back on the air because it actually did have a great deal of substance behind the humor. The guys helped terminally ill people who wrote them to get a makeover for their spouse. Or children whose parents couldn’t afford a new wardrobe. Or helping save couples and their romantic interests in one another. It always ended with an uplifting message of love, unity and smiles. Some people have a knee jerk reaction to judge any part of gay programs that dare not have a scruffy, rugby playing bear. And it’s that same type of ignorance that antigay people clinch to when demanding we change our ways and be like everyone else.

  25. m says

    why do people always get into this stupid debate over who is ok with being gay and who isn’t? or who is better than who? does anyone really care? and if someone is really ok with their out proud gay self why the need to bash anyone else who might have problems?

  26. Austin says

    Love this show and how they were gay, proud, and iconic at the time. Loved everything it represented and still represents. Many of them see on t.v all the time still.

  27. bostonbeat says

    these guys were quite funny and i found them all to be rather sweet and did not come off as pretentious. what they were doing was a big deal at that time…

  28. Mage says

    It may look a little dated now, but this was a ground-breaking, bleeding edge show in its day. If you didn’t like it, you’re certainly entitled to your opinion. But bad-mouthing the men who did it is kind of a cheap shot.

  29. GB says

    The show was cringe worthy. Kyan went on to become the definition of narcissism. If Carson showed up on a show, it was like someone’s idea of gay charity. Thom seemed to suffer as the ugly big sister. The other two vanished into David Bromstad land.

  30. Gee says

    This was a time when gays were feeling on the fringes of straight acceptance. Shows like this (Queer Eye, Queer As Folk) attempted to explain gayness to the masses. And now homosexual evolution, has warped and twisted itself into replicate heterosexuality. It seems miraculous, if not for the spike in violence against the “queers”

  31. Gee says

    This was a time when gays were feeling on the fringes of straight acceptance. Shows like this (Queer Eye, Queer As Folk) attempted to explain gayness to the masses. And now homosexual evolution, has warped and twisted itself into replicate heterosexuality. It seems miraculous, if not for the spike in violence against the “queers”

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