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Benedict Cumberbatch Is Gay WWII Codebreaker Alan Turing In First Trailer For 'The Imitation Game' - VIDEO

Screenshot 2014-07-21 13.52.02

The first trailer for The Imitation Game, a historical drama focusing on Alan Turing, has dropped. Starring Benedict Cumberbatch as Turing and Game of Thrones’s Charles Dance as Alastair Denniston, the film follows the story of Turing’s recruitment into Britain’s Government Code and Cypher School during WWII to decrypt Nazi communicae. Often thought of as the “father of theoretical computer science and artificial intelligence,” Turing was responsible for many of the early examples of computer science, designing the Turing Machine, Automatic Computing Engine, and developing the very concept of the algorithm.

Turing, a gay man, was charged under England’s 20th century indecency laws after openly acknowledging his ongoing relationship with Arnold Murray. An early version of a screenplay for The Imitation Game came under fire from Turing biographer Andrew Hodge, whose Turing biography serves as the basis for much of The Imitation Game’s plot.

Hodges felt as if the film was in danger of downplaying Turing’s homosexuality and emphasizing his relationship with Joan Clarke. Clarke, portrayed in the film by Keira Knightley, was briefly engaged to Turing before Turing is said to have come out to her. Their relationship, says Hodges, worked “because he could talk to her as if she were really another man,” not because of any sort of genuine romantic interest. The trailer seems to make mention of Turing’s inability to feel for Clarke romantically but that may be the film’s sole mention of their relationship in those terms.

Watch the trailer for The Imitation Game AFTER THE JUMP...

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First Look: Benedict Cumberbatch as Gay WWII Codebreaker Alan Turing in 'The Imitation Game'

Cumberbatch

Entertainment Weekly has posted the first stills from The Imitation Game, which stars Benedict Cumberbatch as gay World War II codebreaker Alan Turing.

During World War II, Alan Turing, who is known as the father of modern computing, devised the Turing Bombe, a codebreaking device that was used to decipher the Nazi enigma codes, up to 3,000 messages per day. He was also gay, and two years after being convicted of "gross indecency" for being homosexual and sentenced to undergo hormone therapy, he killed himself with a cyanide-laced apple.

Also starring in the movie, which arrives in November, are Keira Knightly, Charles Dance, Matthew Goode, and Downton Abbey's Allen Leech.

EW has also posted some thoughts from Cumberbatch on the character.

One more shot, AFTER THE JUMP...

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Pet Shop Boys to Debut Musical Piece on Gay WWII Codebreaker Alan Turing

Pet shop boys

At an upcoming BBC concert this summer, The Pet Shop Boys will debut A Man from the Future - a new music project centered around gay World War II codebreaker Alan Turing.

Digital Spy reports:

Alan turingThe piece includes an orchestra, a choir, electronics and a narrator, and is based on the life and work of computer pioneer and code-breaker Alan Turing, who died 60 years ago but in December 2013 was granted a royal pardon for his conviction for homosexuality.

Pet Shop Boys have worked closely with Andrew Hodges, author of Alan Turing: The Enigma. The orchestrations for A Man from the Future are by Sven Helbig, who the duo also worked with on their ballet The Most Incredible Thing.

The duo said: "It is an honor for us to be invited to present some new music at The Proms and to celebrate Alan Turing 60 years after his death."

The opening night of BBC's Late Night Proms will take place at the Royal Albert Hall on July 23. 


Computer Genius Alan Turing's Morphogenesis Theory Proven Correct

Alan Turing Morphogenesis

Morphogenisis is the theory created by computer science genius and Nazi Enigma code breaker Alan Turing that the shaping of an organism by embryological processes of differentiation of cells, tissues, and organs and the development of organ systems according to the genetic “blueprint” of the potential organism and environmental conditions. That is, it's the process by which an organism develops its shape.

Until now, morphogenesis was just a theory, but scientists at Brandeis University and the University of Pittsburgh have released their findings from a study that confirm Turing's theory. Using computational tools to analyze rings of synthetic cell-like structures, Drs. Seth Fraden and G. Bard Ermentrout saw not only all six of Turing's predicted patterns play out, but an additional seventh pattern that Turing hadn't predicted. The results could explain biological phenomena such as the pigmentation of seashells to the shapes of flowers and leaves and even the geometric structures seen in drug-induced hallucinations. 

You can read a paper on the research over at the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.

During World War II, Alan Turing, who is known as the father of modern computing, devised the Turing Bombe, a codebreaking device that was used to decipher the Nazi enigma codes, up to 3,000 messages per day. He was also gay, and two years after being convicted of "gross indecency" for being homosexual and sentenced to undergo hormone therapy, he killed himself with a cyanide-laced apple.


Was Alan Turing Murdered By British Security Services?

Although Alan Turing — the famous British World War II codebreaker who helped thwart the Nazis and was later prosecuted for being gay — recently received a royal pardon for "gross indecency," British gay activist Peter Tatchell wants an inquiry into Turing's death, as he suspects that Turing may have been murdered by British security services rather than committed suicide as previously thought.

TurningAfter what Tatchell calls a "perfunctory and inadequate" inquest of Turing's death, Turing's cause of death was reportedly self-poisoning through ingestion of a cyanide-laced apple.

However, Tatchell says that during the homophobic and xenophobic political atmosphere of the 1950s "the security services would have been very fearful that Turing [and his gay life were] vulnerable to blackmail and anxious that he might pass information [regarding his 'expert knowledge of code breaking, advanced mathematics and computer science'] to the Soviets."

Tatchell adds that, "Although there is no evidence that Turing was murdered by state agents, the fact that this possibility has never been investigated is a major failing... A new inquiry is long overdue, even if only to dispel any doubts about the true cause of his death.”

Turing's punishment for "gross indecency" was to undergo chemical castration to diminish his sex drive — a hormone therapy that rendered him impotent and caused him to develop breasts. Nevertheless, Express.co.uk reports, "There was nothing in Turing’s final days to suggest he was in despair. He had left a note on his office desk the Friday before he died reminding himself of tasks to be done after the weekend."

Turing has experienced a recent resurgence in popularity. In addition to the royal pardon, the famed cryptoanalyst has also received a statue of himself in Paddington, London; an upcoming movie about his life as well as a petition to get him on the £10 note.


First Look: Benedict Cumberbatch as Gay Codebreaker Alan Turing in 'The Imitation Game'

Cumberbatch

In the wake of Alan Turing's royal pardon this week from the British government for his conviction for "gross indecency", Black Bear Pictures has released the first image of Benedict Cumberbatch as Turing in the forthcoming biopic The Imitation Game, The Wrap reports:

Cumberbatch stars as codebreaker and mathematician Turing, who was prosecuted for being homosexual and eventually committed suicide via cyanide poisoning.

Keira Knightley co-stars alongside Matthew Goode, Mark Strong and Charles Dance. Morten Tyldum (“Headhunters”) directed from Graham Moore’s script, which topped the 2011 Black List.

In addition to producers Teddy Schwarzman, Nora Grossman and Ido Ostrowsky, the project boasts a top notch below-the-line team including Oscar-winning editor William Goldenberg (“Argo”), composer Clint Mansell (“Black Swan”), cinematographer Oscar Faura (“The Impossible”) and production designer Maria Djurkovic (“Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy”).

Said Justice Secretary Chris Grayling, announcing the pardon: "Dr Alan Turing was an exceptional man with a brilliant mind. His brilliance was put into practice at Bletchley Park during the second world war, where he was pivotal to breaking the Enigma code, helping to end the war and save thousands of lives. His later life was overshadowed by his conviction for homosexual activity, a sentence we would now consider unjust and discriminatory and which has now been repealed. Dr Turing deserves to be remembered and recognised for his fantastic contribution to the war effort and his legacy to science. A pardon from the Queen is a fitting tribute to an exceptional man."


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