Comments

  1. soulbrotha says

    Why change the facts? If Dali said he rejected him, why not just make the film accurate? Could it be the story would be a complete snooze without adding a lie?

  2. Alex says

    I am SOOOOO excited for this!

    Lorca is my favorite writer ever. I would not be a writer myself had it not been for him. I hope this is better than when Andy Garcia played him in the atrocity that was The Disappearance of Federico Garcia Lorca.

    Soulbrotha, there really aren’t a lot of “facts” when it comes to Lorca’s sex life. It’s entirely plausible he and Dali had sex. What we DO know is there was an intense emotional bond between the two. A bond so strong that when Bunel came between them, Lorca entered a deep depression and fled to New York (where he wrote Poet in New York).

  3. soulbrotha says

    Alex, I understand what you’re saying. But one fact we do know is that Dali said himself that he rejected him. I don’t know much about Dali. Was he a pathological liar or something? Why wouldn’t his word be taken as fact?

  4. Mike in the Tundra says

    So much of Lorca’s life including his death is in dispute, there’s little wonder that there is confusion about his relationship with Dali as well.

  5. Mike in the Tundra says

    Actually, David there is a great deal of disagreement. I assume that someone wants to rewrite history, but I don’t know who is giving the correct answers. I’m old, but not so old that I was there to witness his death. Was he executed at The Fountain of Tears? Was he executed, because he was homosexual? Was he executed by having bullets fired into his anus?

    As for his affair with Dali, only Lorca and Dali know for certain. We’re not going to get much information from either one. Dali certainly seemed to be a big ‘ol mo, but he wouldn’t be the first big ol’ mo who never acted on his natural inclination.

  6. Crystal says

    I am curious to see the depth the actors can put into these characters. I know for certain they can pull it off from past works, but I am still extremely curious. Pattinson has proved himself to be quite a unique and skilled actor this past decade. I cannot wait to see future works.

  7. Mark says

    The relationship is purely speculation between both artists. Dali could not have sex due to being kicked in the groin by a mule in his early teenage years, although he did try. The woman that is rumoured to have had sex with Lorca while Dali acted as a voyeur was in fact the only woman Dali ever claimed to love but couldn’t love completely. Dali claimed to have been emotionally attracted to Lorca, but not physically attracted. It’s really sad that the writer of this movie is skipping on the facts and making a movie that discredits both artists.

  8. says

    I would almost guarantee the naysayers are basing their claim that Dali rejected Lorca based on the widely-circulating, sensationalistic quote Dali gave in a 1969 Spanish interview. It is important to note that, at the time, Dali was living under the last fascist dictator in Europe, a real sweetheart who was still ordering periodic “limpias de maricones” (“faggot purges”) in which thousands were “disappeared” just as Lorca had been. Dali could have been imprisoned simply for speaking Lorca’s name in public ( which was forbidden) let alone letting loose such a glorious monument of double-speak as he did. There are various translations floating around, but most go something like “He was a homosexual, as everyone knows, and madly in love with me. He tried to screw me twice, but I could not yield to him, because I am not a homosexual, and besides, it hurt. Still, I was quite flattered vis a vis prestige. He was a great poet, and so I felt obligated to offer him a piece of the Divine Dali’s ass.” Nothing happened, but “it hurt”? He was so “repulsed” they tried it twice? He’s straight as an arrow, but he felt “obligated to offer him a piece of the Divine Dali’s ass”?

    That’s got to be the most fabulous “denial” ever!

    However, the interesting part about the story depicted in Little Ashes is that it all comes either directly from Dali’s own mouth, or from their letters to one another. As I said, that fabulously scandalous quote gets widely tossed around as “proof” there was nothing between them, but Dali refuted himself on that rendition of the story several times to various close friends, who all report he claimed the desire was mutual, but it simply did hurt too much, so they had to quit before full penetration had occurred. And, most importantly of all, Dali summoned Lorca’s biographer Ian Gibson to his deathbed because he wanted totalk to him about his relationship with Lorca. He was barely able to communicate at the time, but he urgently tried to impress upon Gibson how deeply he had loved Lorca, how he believed they were “soulmates,” but that things had fallen apart between them because he was simply “too scared” of what a relationship like this would mean. So he ran away to Paris, Buñuel (the cross-dressing serial gay-basher) and Gala. He also repeated to him wtlith more detail an anecdote he’d mentioned in his autobiography, which is that after he and Lorca failed to consummate, they had decided Lorca would sleep with a female friend of theirs, Marguerita Manso, while Dali watched and masturbated, and Dali cited this as the beginning of his voyeurism.

    In terms of their letters to one another, it is also fair to note that Dali is by far the more brazen of the two, referring to Lorca as “my erotic beastling,” noting “the strict horoscopical correspondence between your thumb and your cock,” sending him florid, romantic valentine’s cards pledging his body, heart and soul for all eternity, and even sending a half-naked photo of himself posing in his studio.

    All this to say the story told in the film is as accurate as it can be, and the whole story comes straight from the mouth of the Great Denier himself. So, to anyone who’s done any research at all, there is no controversy over what happened — they loved each other, it was mutual, but Dali was literally too uptight for full consummation (at least according to the heterocentric model) to occur, and after that panic, Dali was too scared. So, he put on a mask and lived a lie, which is what most gay men did back then. Sad, but true.

  9. says

    i can’t wait for this.

    has anyone read the secret life of salvador dali? it certainly does not paint a pretty picture (pardon the pun) of dali, and, although it touches on it, it doesn’t go into as much detail about his relationship with lorca as this film looks like it will.

    awesome. looks good.

  10. says

    Surrealist-turned-catholic painter, Salvador Dali, has produced over 1,500 paintings in his career. Salvador Dali is considered as the greatest artist of the surrealist art movement and one of the greatest masters of art of the twentieth century. Salvador Dali Paintings are warmly welcomed by thousands of people. Top quality and handmade paintings are guaranteed!

Leave A Reply