Mindblowing Photos: Space Shuttle And Hubble Transiting the Sun

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Some absolutely stunning and unique photos by amateur astonomer Thierry Legault, who photographed the Space Shuttle Atlantis and the Hubble Telescope side-by-side as they transited the sun. The shot of Atlantis and Hubble was captured just minutes before the grapple of Hubble by Atlantis on May 13.

Large stunning photos here.

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Gizmodo reports: "Shot just after launch, the image shows the faraway scene as viewed
through a Takahashi TOA-130 refractor telescope (focal length 2200mm)
and a Baader solar prism, which gives the Sun its muted look. Strapped
to the back of the telescope, the 5D was set to ISO 100 and a 1/8000
shutter speed, the camera's extreme low and high settings, respectively
[Edit: woops, the Mk II actually does ISO 50]. Legault used the free online Celestial Observer tool to calculate the best time to shoot from his location. "

Shuttletransit

Comments

  1. says

    DEAR SCIENTITIAN:

    The term “geek” used to be derogatory, but in our digital age people seem to be claiming it as a badge of honor … espcially “computer geeks.”

    That having been said, here are some of my favorite astronomy bookmarks:

    http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy
    (Astronomy Phil Plait is very Gay-friendly.)

    http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html

    http://ciclops.org

    http://www.spaceweather.com

    http://www.universetoday.com

  2. Disgusted American says

    as a person who loves the idea of space/space travel/and a Trekkie…..I find this fasinating! But I dont understand how they got the reflection on the sun? im stumped/?? also – answer me this…how come when they show the astronauts space-walking u never see te gazillion stars? It always looks like they are against Black Velvet.

  3. Bryan says

    Count me in, too. On more than one occasion, I’ve gotten up in the middle of the night to view meteor shows and other countless sightings from the highest geographical locations in my area. One highlight: a dead-on close-up view of Jupiter’s rings.

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