Grindr Hub




The Ridiculous Game of Hook-Up Apps Condensed Into One Infographic

If you’re a gay (or bisexual) man with a smartphone in your pocket, then there’s a good chance that you’ve dealt with suppressing a Pavlovian response to this tone at least once or twice. Grindr, regardless of how you feel about it, has become a flawless fixture in the lives of many queer men looking to build long-lasting, meaningful relationships centered around common interests.

Navigating your way around Grindr can sometimes be super-difficult, but this infographic from GrabHim is a handy little flowchart to help you tap your way to Mr. Right with little to no hassle. Some key takeaways: endowment is everything, body fat is a sin, and no one is to be trusted.

Click the graphic below for an expanded view.

Phone_infographic-FULL-Size

(VIA GrabHim.net)


A Gay Scene Is Slowly Forming In North Dakota's Oil Patch

Screen shot 2015-02-01 at 7.08.10 PM

The above image is an actual Craigslist ad for "Men Seeking Men" in Williston, North Dakota. 

As one might expect, Craigslist and Grindr are among the few ways for gay men to meet in the state's booming oil patch — the Bakken shale formation.

Vice.com drills down into the region's gay scene, beginning with the author's first-person account of a rendezvous with a roughneck: 

My one and only liaison in the oil fields of western North Dakota was with a 23-year-old truck driver. Like most such encounters in the oil patch, ours originated on Grindr, the mobile hookup app for gay, bisexual, and curious men. He sent me a photo, and we traded some biographical details. A few hours later, he was in my room at the Williston Super 8.

After our rendezvous, as the November night air dipped below ten degrees, we took shelter in his car to smoke cigarettes. I was only going to be in the state for 48 more hours, but we made tentative plans to go shooting the next day. I was less interested in exercising my Second Amendment rights for the first time than in extending our easy fling. He just needed to see whether he could get off work that day—no small task for someone accustomed to 16-hour shifts, six days a week.

Because they work such long hours, most gays in the oil patch have little time for romance, the story explains. The closest gay bar is in Winnipeg, Canada, a seven-hour drive, and workers risk harassment or losing their jobs if they come out — since few of the companies doing business there have LGBT protections: 

At Outlaws' Bar & Grill, a steakhouse in Williston, I met Jim, a 52-year-old twice-divorced Wisconsin native with two sons. Jim used to run his own advertising business, but it fell apart in the 2008 recession. After struggling to pay off his debt, he decided to move to North Dakota to take a job in what's euphemistically called saltwater disposal, the process of pumping water-like fracking waste deep underground.

"I'm pretty much in the closet," Jim told me. "I just don't want to have to deal with all that comes with it—you know, with all the questions. I think, for me, it's all about meeting Mr. Right. If I met Mr. Right, then I'd be more open." ...

During the day, Jim often cruises Grindr, looking for other "masculine" types. There's no shortage of them: the guys who sport beards and tattoos—some heavy-set, some more fit—and self-identify with the app's "rugged" tribe or insist on "masc only." Other than scouring social apps—and if you can't bear the small talk, there's always Craigslist—there aren't a whole lot of ways for Jim to meet Mr. Right.

But even in the oil patch, which may be among the last professional frontiers of gay acceptance, things are slowly changing, Vice reports. Minot, on the eastern edge of the patch, has a Pride group as well as bars with large gay clienteles, and signs of queer life are even starting to bubble up in the heart of the shale:  

There is something of a growing community in Williston at the center of the oil industry as well. Jon Kelly throws occasional house parties for his queer friends. The gatherings are small, but Kelly sees them as evidence of broader progress.

"There are the beginnings of a scene here," Kelly said. "Over the last few years, more and more people are willing to be open about it."

Read Vice's full piece here


National Institutes of Health Finance $400,000 Study of Grindr Behavior

Screenshot 2015-01-26 10.16.08

The National Institutes of Health have put forth nearly half a million dollars for a study being conducted by Columbia University analyzing gay mens’ use of geolocation-based networking apps like Grindr, Scruff, and Jack’d.

“Smartphone technologies have provided a new venue for sexual partnering among men who have sex with men (MSM),” the study’s grant proposal reads. “Indeed, there are a rapidly growing number of smartphone applications designed to facilitate sexual partnering among MSM.”

The study, led by professor of sociomedical sciences Karolynn Siegel, interviewed 60 self-identified gay men who have sex with other men about the ways in which mobile networking apps influenced their sexual and social behavior. In particular the study focused on the “sexual and emotional states” (like arousal and impulsivity) of its participants in an attempt to better understand the effect that smartphone apps have on the potential for risky sexual behavior:

“Given the expediency with which men are able to arrange sexual encounters using these applications, there is cause to question if, when, and how sexual negotiation and serostatus disclosure occurs.

The overall study goal is to understand how sexual risk behaviors among MSM may be facilitated by the nature of GPS-enabled smartphone applications, the way they are used, and the process by which sexual partnering occurs via smartphone applications.”


If Guys Acted in Real Life the Way They Do on Gay Apps: VIDEO

Appholes

Perhaps you're familiar with a few of these 'appholes'?

Watch, AFTER THE JUMP...

Continue reading "If Guys Acted in Real Life the Way They Do on Gay Apps: VIDEO" »


Gay Couples Read Grindr Messages: VIDEO

Gay Couples Read Grindr

We've all gotten at least one of those messages before that just makes you stop and wonder if someone ever thought about how it would sound out loud. YouTube users TrentAndLuke took that concept, got some of their friends together, and had them read actual Grindr conversations out loud to each other. They range from the annoying, such as the endless "Hi", "Hello" ping pong match, to stuff so raunchy and wrong that one of the couples almost refused to read it.

You can watch all the wrongness AFTER THE JUMP... (NSFW obviously)

Continue reading "Gay Couples Read Grindr Messages: VIDEO" »


It's Time To Rethink Online Gay Social Networks

  Screenshot 2014-12-11 14.20.17

The Interplay is a special biweekly series exploring the intersections of sex, pop culture, and current events.

BY CHARLES PULLIAM-MOORE

The writing is on the wall: we’ve (unsurprisingly) hit peak mobile application. In the early days of powerful mobile computing the idea of there being “an app for that” was radical. Creating virtual communities unbound by space, time, and economic circumstance was game changing for gay men across the world.

As the years have gone on, however, gay social networks that live on servers have flooded the market with variations of the same guy-on-a-grid experience. If Grindr, for example, is for everyone, then Scruff is for everyone with a little bit more body hair. Growlr’s the same, but for bears, and Daddyhunt’s focused primary on connecting strapping men of a certain age. Beneath slightly different coats of paint all of these applications are derivative of one another. It’s time that we demand more of them.

Last week Scruff’s Chief Product Officer Jason Marchant published an op-ed in the Huffington Post describing the steps Scruff has taken to work against the cultural stigma attached to being HIV-positive. Scruff, like an increasing number of mobile networking apps, is emphasizing the use of categorical filters to help its users find the kinds of guys they’re looking for without risk of being ostracized.    

“For "Poz" guys uncomfortable disclosing status in their profile, "HIV Status" presents a fraught choice: to answer "Negative" would be dishonest, but any other answer -- including no answer -- is often interpreted by other users as a tacit disclosure. It's also a problem for HIV negative guys searching for the same. Seeing "Negative" presented next to other profile "stats" conveys a false sense of permanence.

BluedRecently applications like Scruff have positioned themselves as valuable assets in efforts to curtail the spread of various STIs. As a part of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo’s plan to eradicate new HIV infections in the state by 2020, New York City began using Grindr and Scruff to inform gay men about pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Blued, a popular Chinese gay networking app, actively encourages its users to seek out HIV tests at its parent company’s office free of charge.  

All of these platforms want to be thought of as more than hookup apps, and gradually their platforms are trying to address the gay community’s needs other than sex. Other than public health outreach and offering free advertising space, however, the “social” experience of these networks seems to have plateaued. It doesn’t have to be that way, though.

CONTINUED, AFTER THE JUMP...

Continue reading "It's Time To Rethink Online Gay Social Networks" »


Trending



Towleroad - Blogged