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Overwhelming Majority of Young US Catholics Are Pro-Gay

Fracis2Though still officially opposed to homosexuality, the Catholic Church’s opinions of LGBT people is slowly evolving to align with the opinions of its followers. In June the Pew Research Center found that an overwhelming majority of Catholics--85%--between the ages of 18 and 29 felt that homosexuality should be socially acceptable. Catholics above the age of 65 were less supportive, but a 57% majority also reported that being gay should be accepted by general society.

A two-week long synod of Catholic bishops convened by Pope Francis has resulted in the drafting of a theological document arguing for wider acceptance of gays by the church. In it gay people are described as having “gifts and qualities to offer to the Christian community.” The document also acknowledges the fundamental love and intimacy that exists within committed gay relationships.

Drafted by a committee selected by Francis, the preliminary draft will be circulated both amongst synod participants and throughout the Catholic community for debate, revision, and review. In the past, similar documented shifts in position have resulted in long lasting change in church ideology. Many attendees of the gathering are likening it to The Second Vatican Council--a synod that redefined the Church’s relationship to other religions.

“A large number of bishops do not accept the ideas of openness, but few know that,” said Raymond Leo Burke, a conservative American cardinal working within the vatican. “[Many] are supporting the possibility of adopting a practice that deviates from the truth of the faith.”

Those opposing the document’s pro-LGBT stance have been quick to point out that it is more of working reference paper rather than a steadfast decree. In addition to a softening position towards gays, the document debates how the church should treat separated, but not divorced couples. It also condemns making financial aid contingent on ideological congruity between nation states, as the US has done to certain countries with oppressive anti-gay laws.

Read the full translated document AFTER THE JUMP...

 

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Maggie Gallagher Says Duck Dynasty Is Responsible For Dip in Public Support for Gay Marriage

Maggie

In a new post over at the National Review, NOM co-founder Maggie Gallagher offers her take on the recent Pew poll that found a 5-point dip in public support for gay marriage (49%).

Writes Gallagher: 

It may well be an outlier, but here is why I suspect not:

White Evangelical support for gay marriage dropped 4 percentage points, from 22 percent to 18 percent; Catholic support dropped 9 percentage points, from 61 percent to 52 percent. (White mainline Protestant opinion was virtually unchanged, rising from 56 percent support to 57 percent support.) Unaffiliated support for gay marriage continued its rise — from 71 percent to 76 percent in just one year.

But something happened over the last year to give traditional Christians second thoughts about what gay marriage would mean. What could that be?

RobertsonThe most likely candidate is A&E’s decision to suspend Duck Dynasty patriarch Phil Robertson, after he expressed, rather colorfully, rather standard orthodox Christian views on gay sex.

The Duck Dynasty incident was not, of course, alone. In the spring of 2014, 65,000 people signed their names to a petition stating that Mozilla CEO Brendan Eich must either recant his opposition to gay marriage or be fired. The firestorm caused him to step down. The Eich case is salient for gay-marriage opponents because he had done nothing to deserve a public tarring and feathering except contribute once to the Prop 8 campaign in California. 

Gallagher goes on to point out that a similar drop in support occured back in 2009 in response to the backlash against Miss California Carrie Prejean after she stated her opposition to marriage equality


New Poll Shows More Support for Mixing Religion and Politics, Less Support for Gay Marriage

Report

A new Pew Research Center poll has some surprising findings about the American public's attitude on religion, politics, and homosexuality.

Among the poll's findings - nearly three-quarters of the public (72%) now thinking religion is losing its influence on American life and 56% of the public sees this development as a "bad thing."

Pew reports:

The share of Americans who say churches and other houses of worship should express their views on social and political issues is up 6 points since the 2010 midterm elections (from 43% to 49%). The share who say there has been “too little” expression of religious faith and prayer from political leaders is up modestly over the same period (from 37% to 41%). And a growing minority of Americans (32%) think churches should endorse candidates for political office, though most continue to oppose such direct involvement by churches in electoral politics.

At the same time, the poll also found a decrease in support for gay marriage and an uptick in the percent of the public who considers homosexuality a "sin."

PollIt finds a slight drop in support for allowing gays and lesbians to marry, with 49% of Americans in favor and 41% opposed – a 5-point dip in support from a February Pew Research poll, but about the same level as in 2013. It is too early to know if this modest decline is an anomaly or the beginning of a reversal or leveling off in attitudes toward gay marriage after years of steadily increasing public acceptance. Moreover, when the February poll and the current survey are combined, the 2014 yearly average level of support for same-sex marriage stands at 52%, roughly the same as the 2013 yearly average (50%).

The new poll also finds that fully half (50%) of the public now considers homosexuality a sin, up from 45% a year ago. And nearly half of U.S. adults think that businesses like caterers and florists should be allowed to reject same-sex couples as customers if the businesses have religious objections to serving those couples.

The poll has a number of other interesting (and disturbing) findings, including nearly a third of white evangelicals considering themselves minorities because of their religious beliefs and fewer Americans saying the Obama Administration is friendly towards religion. 

Check out the full report AFTER THE JUMP...

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Grindr Poll Accurately Predicts Scottish Independence Vote

Grindr

With neither the BBC nor any other UK media outlet paying for exit polling for the referendum on Scottish independence, there was a marked degree of uncertainty about which direction Scotland would vote during last night's vote.

News outlets and concerned citizens, however, needed only look at Tumblr user machotrout's Grindr poll to figure out that the UK would be staying intact. 

Over the past couple of days, machotraout polled several hundred Grindr users in Edinburgh whether they believed Scotland should be an independent country. 

The polls breakdown in responses:

NO: 114

YES: 101

Undecided: 24

Other opinion: 20

Indifference: 15

Evasion: 38

Bemusement: 13

Amusement: 2

Too horny to answer: 6

General rejection: 4

Did not respond: 318

machhotrout added that when only decisive opinions were taken into account, Grindr voted NO on independence 54%-46%, which is remarkably close to how the final vote went down (55.3% no -44.7% yes)

You can visit the poll HERE and check out more screen-grab images from the polling (some of the responses are quite funny) 


New Gallup Poll Looks at the Most and Least Hospitable Regions for Gays Around the World

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A new poll by Gallup finds that less than three in 10 adults across 123 countries say where they live is a "good place' for gays to live, with the highest hospitable attitude claims coming from Netherlands (83%), Iceland (82%), and Canada (80%). Nearly all of the countries where residents say their city or area is "not a good place" for gays to live were African nations.  

For the U.S. 70% of respondents said where they live was a good place for gays, 22% said not a good place, and 8% didn't know or refused to answer.  

Gallup reports:

Of the countries where three in four or more residents feel their area is hospitable to gay and lesbian people, all but Canada are in Europe, and all but Ireland (75%) have marriage equality laws. In Ireland, voters will cast their ballots on a referendum in 2015, and the country could join their European neighbors in allowing marriage equality by next year.

By contrast, in many of the countries where the residents are least likely to feel their city or area is a "good place," it is illegal to be openly gay. For example, "an improper or unnatural act with a person of the same sex," as Senegal's anti-gay law dictates, can be punished with up to five years in prison and fines of up to $3,000. Laws that allow for the imprisonment of gay and lesbian people are also on the books in Pakistan -- where 1% say their area is a good place for gay people to live -- Uganda (2%), Ethiopia (2%), and Afghanistan (2%).

The global average and ranking did not include data from more than a dozen countries such as Saudi Arabia, Iran, Iraq, and Egypt because the question "Is the city or area where you live a good place or not a good place to live for gay or lesbian people?" was itself too sensitive to ask. 

Check out the full poll HERE


Poll: Republicans Warming to Gay Candidates, Less Okay With Gay Kids or Same-Sex Marriage

A new poll released Friday shows that while the Republican Party is warming up to the idea of openly gay candidates, members are still strongly opposed to same-sex marriage and most would be upset if one of their children came out as gay. 

The Washington Post reports:

Gopnew poll from McClatchy and Marist College shows that 68 percent of Republicans say they would be no less likely to support a well-qualified gay candidate, and 59 percent say they prefer that states decide same-sex marriage rather than the federal government -- a stance that effectively is allowing such unions to take hold across the country.

At the same time, a strong majority of Republicans still personally oppose same-sex marriage (63 percent), and a similar proportion remains concerned about these issues directly affecting their family. In fact, six in 10 say they would be upset if one of their children were gay. Thirty-seven percent say they would be upset if their child told them that he or she was gay, while 23 percent say they would be "very upset." One-quarter of Republicans say they would not be upset at all.

Three in 10 Democrats and independents said they would be upset. 

The Washington Post adds that a 1985 poll for the Los Angeles Times "showed that 89 percent of Americans said they would be upset -- including 64 percent being "very upset" -- today, 35 percent say they would be upset, and only 12 percent say "very upset." 


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