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Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni Says Foreign Aid Is 'Sinful': VIDEO

Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni has said that receiving foreign aid in exchange for the fair treatment of his country’s LGBT community is “sinful," according to The Telegraph.

Yoweri museveniSeveral countries have cut aid to Uganda in response to the introduction of severe anti-gay laws that include a sentence of life imprisonment.  

Last month the U.S. cut aid to Uganda, imposed visa restrictions on Ugandans involved in human rights violations, and cancelled a planned military exercise with the Ugandan army.

Speaking at a religious conference in Kampala, Museveni welcomed cuts to foreign aid because they had "aroused" Ugandans and made them realise they needed to "undertake serious work" to build self-reliance.

Museveni continued that to accept aid in return for fair treatment of homosexuals “is a bad omen, you are committing a sin to offer that aid, or to receive it.”

Speaking to The Telegraph, Tamale Mirundi, a spokesman for Museveni, said:

"In his speech [Museveni] made clear that Uganda can be self-reliant, and the aid cuts have woken us up and invigorated us. The president has always opposed aid, from the beginning."

Watch John Oliver tackle Uganda's anti-gay laws, AFTER THE JUMP...

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John Oliver Tackles Uganda’s Anti-Gay Law: VIDEO

Oliver

John Oliver went after Uganda’s draconian anti-gay laws on his show yesterday, with particular emphasis placed on the origins of the laws. Spoiler alert: both the U.S. and the U.K. have blood on their hands.

The "Last Week Tonight" host also pointed out that merely calling Uganda’s law “harsh doesn’t really do them justice”:

“That’s like calling Stalin a bit of a grump. Or the triangle shirt-waist fire a ‘whoopsie-do.’ Or the Titanic a disappointing vacation.”

Watch the segment (with some work-unfriendly language), AFTER THE JUMP…

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Ugandan President ‘Ridiculed’ Hillary Clinton When Challenged on Anti-Homosexuality Act

Hillary Clinton has revealed in her memoir Hard Choices that she unsuccessfully urged Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni to halt the passage of his country’s Anti-Homosexuality Act.

Hillary Clinton Hard ChoicesSaid Clinton: "He [President Museveni] ridiculed my concerns."

The Act, which was given presidential assent by Mr Museveni in February, calls for offenders to be sentenced to 14 years in prison and makes it a criminal offence to not report someone for being gay.

Last week, the U.S. announced that it had cut aid to Uganda, cancelled a planned military exercise with the country and banned Ugandan citizens involved in human rights abuses from entering the United States.

In her book, Clinton also writes about her anger at the murder of Ugandan gay rights campaigner David Kato in 2011.

“David was killed in what police said was a robbery but it was more likely an execution. I was appalled that the police and government had done little to protect David after public calls for his murder. But this was about more than police incompetence. It was the result of a nationwide campaign to suppress LGBT people by any means necessary, and the government was part of it."

 


LGBTQ Families Dealt Major Blow at the United Nations

The United Nations Human Rights Council’s “Protection of the Family” resolution passed Thursday has the potential to become the groundwork for LGBT discrimination under international law. Uganda, Egypt, and Russia are among the countries responsible for the creation of the resolution, many of whom have explicitly anti-LGBT track records. This comes only a few weeks after the U.N. unanimously elected Uganda’s Foreign Minister Sam Kutsea, an ardent opponent of LGBT rights, as president for its 69th session.

Flag_of_the_United_Nations.svgThough the resolution does not limit its definition of a singular family to those consisting of one man and one woman, attempts at re-wording the language to be more inclusive have been blocked despite being supported by France, Ireland, and Chile. In not clearly articulating a recognition of different kinds of families, “Protection of the Family” carries the potential of being used to ignore families headed by same-sex couples, single parents, extended family members, or non-biological legal guardians.

The resolution is being held up as proof that there is global opposition to what is often perceived as a bullishly pro-LGBT rights agenda being led by the bulk of Europe and the United States.

“The defeat of various forms of the family demonstrates that the UN is weary of these kinds of debates,” Said Austin Ruse of the Catholic Family and Human Rights Institute. “Most of the member states would like to move on to issues that concern the whole world and not just elites in the [global] North.”

“It is a travesty for the UN to ignore reality,” said Julie de Rivero, director of advocacy for Human Rights Watch with the Human Rights Council. “Insinuating that different type of families don’t exist can do nothing but harm the children and adults around the world who live in those families.”

Read the resolution below:

Resolution on Protection of the Family by jlfeder


Michael Stipe's Passionate Speech On Uganda: VIDEO

Tonight at 9 PM ET, Logo will air a special titled "Trailblazers" to commemorate the one-year anniversary of DOMA's defeat. Included in the special is a brief word from R.E.M.'s Michael Stipe, who eloquently links the past struggles of LGBT Americans with the struggles of today's queer people around the globe:

IStipen the early ’80s, as a 22-year-old queer man living during the Reagan/Bush administration, I was afraid of getting tested for HIV for fear of quarantine, the threat of internment camps and having my basic civil rights stripped away...I waited five years to get my first anonymous test. I am happy that attitudes have matured and changed, and I feel lucky that i live in a country where acceptance, tolerance and policy toward HIV/AIDS and LGBTQ issues have advanced as far as they have.

Stipe goes on to introduce Ugandan gay rights activist John “Longjones” Abdallah Wambere, who fights against the powers that be in his country, where homosexuality is illegal and anti-gay violence continues to rise. As Wambere puts it, speaking to the audience at the "Trailblazers" event, in Uganda "[this event] would be illegal. We would be all arrested or closed."

Check out Stipe and Wambere's speeches, embedded AFTER THE JUMP...

[h/t MTV News]

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Ugandan Gay Rights Activists Lose Case To Ethics And Integrity Minister Who Stormed Meeting

SimonLokodoIn 2012, several gay rights activists were holding a workshop when Ethics and Integrity Minister Simon Lokodo (right), accompanied by police officers, broke it up. The activists filed suit against Lokodo and now, two years later, they've lost. It is an unsurprising but upsetting reminder of just how little the LGBT community of Uganda has left to hold on to since the passage of heinous anti-gay laws late last year.

ENCA reports:

"We lost on all grounds," gay activist Jacqueline Kasha, one of the team who had brought the case against the minister, told AFP.

Lokodo raided the workshop in February 2012 in the Ugandan town of Entebbe flanked by police, saying he had broken up the meeting as the "conscience of this country."

At the time, Amnesty International condemned the raid as "an outrageous attempt to prevent lawful and peaceful activities of human rights defenders in Uganda."

Our condolences and well wishes to the activists.


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